Pros: Driver-like ball speeds in a fairway wood that’s forgiving, workable, and the more affordable option in TaylorMade’s 2016 lineup.

Cons: No adjustability. The sound and feel is different than other fairway woods.

Who’s it for: The M2 fairway woods can be played by golfers of all skill levels, from beginners to PGA Tour players.

The Review

  • Available Lofts: 15, 16.5, 18, 21, 24
  • Stock Shafts: REAX 65 (X, S, R flexes), many custom shafts available free of charge.

“1.49? Really? Again? Man, these new fairway woods are amazing.” That was me during my launch monitor testing for this review. I kept getting pretty high smash factors for a fairway wood. To quickly explain, smash factor is ball speed divided by swing speed, and the average PGA Tour smash factor for a 3 wood is 1.48.

TaylorMade_M2_Fairway_Wood_1

I am not a PGA Tour player, so getting a 1.49 the few times I did was pretty impressive, and shows an advance in technology — not that my swing has actually improved.

To say there’s been a revolution the past five years in fairway wood design is an understatement. Hotter faces are the norm now. I’ve actually heard people say they hit their 3 woods “too far,” which sounds absolutely insane. But with fairway woods the way they are now, many are providing the same relative ball speeds as drivers, and just as much distance.

TaylorMade_M2_Fairway_Wood_crown

When TaylorMade released the M2, there was some chatter that it was a price-point fairway wood, and it wouldn’t be as good as the company’s M1 since it didn’t have the moveable weights and changeable shafts. This is simply not the case. The M2 contains every bit of technology as the M1, and while I didn’t test them head to head, the feedback from most golfers has been that the M2 launches higher, spins less and offers more ball speed than the M1. For that reason, it will be the longer-flying TaylorMade fairway wood for most golfers.

When viewing the clubs in the address position, it’s hard to tell the difference between the M1 and the M2. The M2 has the “ball” grooves, where there’s a centering point of no grooves in the shape of a ball. The only other difference is the M2 has a new “fluted” hosel construction, which moves a few grams of weight lower in the club head, and is said to improve sound and feel. I’m also a fan of the black-and-white painted composite crown. It seems to give off a more compact feeling to me, and makes it easier to line things up.

TaylorMade_M2_Fairway_Wood_hosel

The face also sits square, which is a major requirement for me as well. I’ve bought and immediately sold 3 woods that have faces that are closed. I was actually worried about this, as in years past TaylorMade has sold a TP line of fairway woods, which have a more open face angle than standard models. There is no TP model in the M2 line, and what TaylorMade seems to have done is focused on making the M2 sit perfectly square.

The Results

M2v.VaporFairway

To do my testing, I took the M2 out to my course and played a few rounds, and then took it to the range and also had a couple of simulator sessions. The data above is from The Professional’s Golf Shop using Trackman and premium golf balls. The M2 was 15 degrees with a Fujikura Pro Tour Spec 73X shaft at 43 inches (untipped).

On Trackman, I was attempting to hit fade shots off the deck each time. The results are the 10 shots that best represented the fade. Overall, the numbers are pretty consistent. There were a few really good hits that made me say, “WOW!” But there were also several shots in this bunch that I hit thin, and I expected them to come up much shorter. That is until I got the results and was impressed that the shot still carried 225-230. I left those in, as I wanted to show how forgiving this club can be.

On The Course

On the course is where the M2 fairway wood really shines. Off the deck, I was getting great numbers on the simulator, but on the course I was hitting the M2 places where I have never hit a 3 wood before.

I came close to muttering those words “too far” at one point. I used it on a par 4 to stay short of water, and I ended up only a foot short of the hazard. We’re talking 280 to the water! And distance isn’t even the best thing about this club. Well, maybe … the distance IS pretty awesome. But there’s something else that’s really good, too. It goes back to the shape, sole design and face angle. I’m able to work this club with ease around the course. I can draw, fade, hook, slice, everything really easily with this club. Whether it’s from the tee box or behind 40 trees, I’m able to do some really fun things.

TaylorMade_M2_Fairway_Wood_faceBut I do have one negative. It has the same sound and feel as TaylorMade’s other M2 woods, and it’s something I don’t love. It almost feels a little hollow, and not as solid as other fairway woods. After awhile you do get used to it, and honestly I don’t think about it much now unless I hit another 3 wood right after it.

Comparison

As you might have seen in the data above, I was able to compare the M2 to my gamer, a Nike Vapor Fly (15 degrees with the same shaft, measuring the same length) both on the course and on the simulator. The only difference between the two clubs was that the Nike Vapor Fly’s shaft was tipped 0.5 inches.

Overall, they are pretty similar fairway woods. When hitting the fade shot on the simulator, they were almost identical. Both have great ball speeds, both are forgiving, and both pretty easily hit that shot.

TaylorMade_M2_Fairway_Wood_address

But on the course, the M2 ended up being a better club for me. The Vapor Fly has an open face angle, and it is harder for me to work shots both directions. I can hit fades with it all day, but I struggle to square the face and hit draws with it. The best hits on the simulator showed the M2 as the longer of the two, and that showed up on the course as well, especially off the tee. I thought I loved an open face, but it ended up not being good for me overall and my testing proved it.

Conclusion

The M2 is a fairway wood that anyone can play. It’s built with a square face, neutral weighting, and offers incredible distance. It should absolutely be on a list of fairway woods for any player to check out. It has a great combination of everything that I look for in a fairway wood. The feel and sound is the only knock I have.

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Rob has been playing golf for over 25 years with off and on segments of playing competitively. He likes to think outside of the box in all regards of life and that brings a different perspective to golf. Rob has been writing independently for more than 10 years, and is a true equipment junkie at heart and enjoys tinkering with his equipment in the search for the perfect feel and the perfect shot.

13 COMMENTS

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  1. The upright lie does not bother me one bit and it shouldn’t bother you either until you hit one and decide for yourself. None of my clubs thus far have upright lies and I hit the M2 fairway just fine. My normal miss with a 3-wood is a hook and I actually hook this less than my current x2hot and less than the ping G. The one thing I really wish they would have done is made the hosel adjustable. If they would have done that I’d already have a 3 HL in my bag that is adjusted to a lower loft to open the face.

    This club is 100% about distance. The shaft is longer than a traditional 3-wood and lighter than most stock options. It’s one thing to be able to carry a 3-wood 275 yards with good height off the deck and it’s another to be able to consistently hit it straight or with the shape that a certain shot demands. Switching the 65 gram shaft out for an 85 gram model vastly improved my dispersion and I only lost 3 yards carry on average. For all of you considering this club, I would look into putting a shorter shaft in the club but not necessarily upping the shaft weight as distance may be easier to come by for slower swing speed players.

  2. I wasn’t consciously aware of the upright lie angle everyone’s complaining about but that would explain why I’m liking the club so much. I can’t stand these super flat lie angles so many of these modern fairway woods have. This is the first fairway wood with a real chance of kicking my old Titleist 904f out the bag.

  3. It may technically be square but the lie angle makes it look closed. Also, if you ground the club it has a tendency to want to close even more. A TP version with a flatter lie angle would be a welcome addition. I love the M2 driver, but the 816 alpha is the best fairway wood out there for me.

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