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2022 TaylorMade Stealth driver: TaylorMade’s big bet on a carbon fiber driver face

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The new TaylorMade Stealth driver began as a code-named project, the origins of which go back 20 years. The successor to the SIM line, TaylorMade’s family of Carbonwood drivers includes the Stealth, Stealth Plus, and Stealth HD.

The show-stopping feature of the new 2022 TaylorMade Stealth driver is its centerpiece technology, and it’s likely one you’ve already seen in our in-hand shots of Tiger Woods’ Stealth Plus: a carbon fiber face. For TaylorMade engineers, the conversion to carbon was aimed at one thing: more ball speed.

A close-up look at the new 60X Carbon Fiber Twist Face

A close-up look at the new 60X Carbon Fiber Twist Face

The why and how of TaylorMade’s “60X Carbon Twist Face”

In a surprising departure from industry-standard titanium, TaylorMade engineers turned to another material to construct the face of the Stealth for better energy transfer: carbon. More specifically, 60 layers of strategically arranged carbon fiber sheets.

Interestingly, what TaylorMade is calling the “Carbonwood Age” began decades ago.

“In the mid-2000’s, our research team developed an understanding that the weight of the face can affect impact efficiency, more specifically, the lighter the face, the more efficient the impact and the better the ball speed,” says Brian Bazzel, TaylorMade’s Vice President Product Creation.

“We realized titanium faces could only take us so far and carbon would be the face material of the future. This breakthrough design of a lightweight carbon face in Stealth, has created a whole new starting line, a new era of drivers, a new threshold of performance and a new platform for more innovation.”

With the 60 layers of carbon, TaylorMade touts a thinner, lighter, larger face that features a higher COR (coefficient of restitution) and improved face geometry.

As a result of using a lighter material (carbon), the Stealth’s face is, not surprisingly, substantially lighter than the SIM2. 40 percent lighter than a titanium face of the same size, the carbon face is just 26 grams.

TaylorMade Stealth: A 20-year project

TaylorMade engineers first developed a prototype titanium-covered carbon face in 2003. R&D efforts go back as far as 2000 (TaylorMade 360 days). Engineers then turned their attention to a polymer cover for the carbon fiber — which eventually became the Stealth’s nanotexture face.

In 2012, for the production of the Japan-only Gloire Reserve driver, TaylorMade developed a small-scale composite face production facility.

Following years of continued prototyping, in 2016 TaylorMade engineers developed new manufacturing techniques, which resulted in the first 60-layer carbon face and the beginning of the Stealth project (2018).

Innovation and new manufacturing processes are one thing, but mass production is quite another. And while this is a launch story about a family of products, the process of developing multiple plants for high-volume composite part production is another significant element of the Stealth saga.

Beyond carbon: Other Stealth technology

Nanotexture face technology: A thin polyurethane layer overtop of the carbon fiber creates a surface that is both strong and flexible for improved launch. It’s calibrated to produce ideal friction in dry conditions and features full-face scorelines that also perform particularly well in wet conditions.

According to TaylorMade, the nanotexture face works in conjunction with the company’s Twist Face and Thru-Slot Speed Pocket for enhanced forgiveness on strikes across the face.

“The technological innovation of our nanotexture technology brings the entire face together and was a key to making this driver a reality,” Tomo Bystedt, Senior Director Product Creation, Carbonwood Drivers said. “Without this revolutionary cover design, we could not have achieved the launch and spin performance required to extract the optimal performance in dry as well as wet conditions. Once we added the nanotexture technology to the grooves, we were able to unlock the full performance of a carbon face.” – 

Inertia Generator: Following in SIM’s footsteps, Stealth features an asymmetric Inertia Generator to facilitate optimum speed at impact. Additionally, the Inertia Generator allows additional weight to be placed at the rear of the club for higher MOI, higher launch, and greater forgiveness.

A few comparisons to SIM2

  • Same CT as SIM2 but 1.1 mph more ball speed
  • 11 percent larger face than SIM2
  • 250-300 RPM less spin
  • Carbon fiber face is as durable as titanium
  • Even better sound, based on sentiment rating in player testing

Our Brian Knudson, host of the Club Junkie podcast, had a chance to hit the new Stealth. Here’s what BK had to say

“The first shot left me looking back at the TaylorMade folks in shock. TaylorMade somehow engineered this carbon fiber face to sound and feel like titanium. The Stealth and Stealth Plus were extremely forgiving and consistent on the range. My dispersion was very tight, and I felt like the Stealth launched a little flatter than my SIM2 Max.”

2022 TaylorMade Stealth drivers: The models

TaylorMade Stealth Plus driver

  • Carbon Twist Face weight savings allow for a 10-gram sliding weight track
  • Lowest-spinning driver in the family
TaylorMade Stealth Plus driver: Face view

TaylorMade Stealth Plus driver: 60X Carbon Twist Face

TaylorMade Stealth Plus driver: Weight track, Inertia Generator

TaylorMade Stealth Plus driver: Weight track, Inertia Generator

TaylorMade Stealth Plus driver: Rear view

TaylorMade Stealth Plus driver: Rear view

TaylorMade Stealth Plus driver: Carbon fiber crown

TaylorMade Stealth Plus driver: Carbon fiber crown

TaylorMade Stealth driver

  • Carbon Twist Face weight savings allow more weight to be positioned low and deep in the head
  • 15 percent more MOI compared to Stealth Plus
  • 200-300 RPMs more spin compared to Stealth Plus
TaylorMade Stealth driver: Face view

TaylorMade Stealth driver: Face view

TaylorMade Stealth driver: Sole view

TaylorMade Stealth driver: Sole view

TaylorMade Stealth driver: Rear view

TaylorMade Stealth driver: Rear view

TaylorMade Stealth driver: Crown

TaylorMade Stealth driver: Crown

TaylorMade Stealth HD driver

  • Draw-bias plus high MOI thanks to the Carbon Twist Face weight savings
  • Inertia Generator closer to the heel produces the highest MOI in the Stealth family
  • Similar spin to Stealth Plus
TaylorMade Stealth HD driver: Face

TaylorMade Stealth HD driver: Face

TaylorMade Stealth HD driver: Sole

TaylorMade Stealth HD driver: Sole

TaylorMade Stealth HD driver: Rear view

TaylorMade Stealth HD driver: Rear view

TaylorMade Stealth HD driver: Crown

TaylorMade Stealth HD driver: Crown

TaylorMade Stealth Women’s driver

  • Slightly lighter head weight
  • Different colorway, look
  • Slightly draw-biased

2022 TaylorMade Stealth: Specs, pricing, availability

Stealth Plus, Stealth, and Stealth HD drivers will be available for preorder January 4 and at retail February 4.

Stealth Plus

  • MSRP: $599.99 USD
  • Lofts: 8, 9, 10.5 degrees
  • Stock shafts: Project X HZRDUS Smoke RDX Red 60, Mitsubishi’s Kai’li White 60
  • Grip: Lamkin’s Crossline black/red

Stealth

  • MSRP: $579.99 USD
  • Lofts: 9, 10.5, 12 degrees
  • Stock shafts: Fujikura Ventus Red 5, Aldila Ascent Red 60
  • Grip: Lamkin’s Crossline black/red

Stealth HD

  • MSRP: $579.99 USD
  • Lofts: 9, 10.5, 12 degrees
  • Stock shaft: Fujikura Air Speeder 45
  • Grip: Lamkin’s Crossline black/red

Per TaylorMade, “Women’s stock offerings include the Aldila Ascent Ladies 45 shaft and the Lamkin Ladies Sonar grip. With an elevated focus on customization and club fitting, women golfers can find a full array of components in the Custom Shop at TaylorMadeGolf.com, including lightweight shafts, grips and more.”

Brian Knudson took a deep dive with TaylorMade’s Tomo Bystedt into all things Stealth woods. Club junkies won’t want to miss!

MyStealth

Of particular interest to GolfWRXers, TaylorMade is continuing its “My” program with Stealth.

Via the MyStealth program: In the Stealth Plus model, golfers can choose from various options to create a driver look and feel to match their personal style

  • Face color: Six color options include red, green, yellow, blue, orange, and grey
  • Body color: Two color options include black and chalk (right hand only)
  • Crown finish: Gloss or matte, with or without the TaylorMade ‘T-logo’
  • Sole decal color: Eight color options include blue, black, red, orange, green, gold, pale blue and volt
  • Head covers: Mono or color

MyStealth: Specs, pricing, availability

MyStealth is offered in the Stealth Plus model, with various cosmetic combinations. MyStealth will be available for preorder on January 4 and at TaylorMadeGolf.com as well as select retail locations starting February 4, 2022. MSRP: $699.99 USD. MyStealth will be offered in 9 and 10.5-degree lofts and features fully customizable shaft and grip components.

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18 Comments

18 Comments

  1. Pingback: TaylorMade Stealth Launch Day Report: Everything you need to know about TaylorMade’s new driver – GolfWRX

  2. Vince Guest

    Jan 5, 2022 at 7:21 am

    Holding out for Stealth 2…..coming soon.

  3. stealth owner

    Jan 4, 2022 at 11:12 pm

    its worth it. its fast, forgiving, easy to hit

  4. Brandon

    Jan 4, 2022 at 8:50 pm

    If you get a Grey face, matte top, and black out everything else on the MyStealth page it will actually look stealth. That’s what they should have done to begin with.

  5. Dannyboy

    Jan 4, 2022 at 7:51 pm

    Just over the marketing bologna … no significant change over the last 3 years from the big brands.

  6. Bruce

    Jan 4, 2022 at 7:41 pm

    I wonder if it’s USGA conforming? They were probably scratching their heads over that face coating . . .

  7. geohogan

    Jan 4, 2022 at 7:39 pm

    IMO most signicant is decrease in weight of the face= much more perimeter weighting, allowing more “mass”
    as in F=ma.

    The face isnt rugged enough for the fairway and hybrid clubs?

  8. leon

    Jan 4, 2022 at 1:21 pm

    The COR is capped and limited to 0.83. Wonder how can TW further increase it…

  9. Michael Bigham

    Jan 4, 2022 at 11:47 am

    Wow! only $600 for a driver that’s going to give me an extra three yards, and I get to look at That hideous face every time I tee It up. I can’t wait!

    • Jeff Reed

      Jan 4, 2022 at 12:28 pm

      $849.00 with a shaft upgrade. Yikes.

    • Jack Nash

      Jan 4, 2022 at 12:44 pm

      60 layers of carbon fibre, at 10 bucks a layer isn’t too bad when you consider they said they’ve been working on it for 20 yrs. Lol. Then when you consider it’s 14 times more carbon intensive to make than steel, it’s obvious where TM is getting theres and that’s China. Only 3 countries make carb fibre for manufacturing. U.S. , China, and Japan. If made in the first and latter that driver would cost close to a grand, but Not when China’s involved.

    • Jon

      Jan 4, 2022 at 1:25 pm

      Why are you looking at the face on the tee box?

  10. Jason

    Jan 4, 2022 at 11:38 am

    I can’t wait til next month, when they introduce something else.

    • Drkviol801

      Jan 5, 2022 at 12:15 am

      Me too #metoo

    • Carloyn

      Jan 5, 2022 at 4:07 am

      You know they have to come out with new “Patend” clubs every year so they can Control the retail price….if not retailers could sell them for what they want….the amazing way to skip fair trade laws which once were great but cooperate Lawyers tour them apart over the years…You all know that NO buddy can sell OEM golf club for less then MSRP even at the end of a products run OEM control the price..IE everyone sells Callaway Maverick driver for $299 now, notice no one selling it for $289 or $279….

  11. Vas

    Jan 4, 2022 at 9:45 am

    This one is interesting. If a perfectly-fit Stealth+ gives an additional 1.1 mph of ball speed over my perfectly-fit Sim 2, I’ll buy one… used… in late-summer.

  12. dat

    Jan 4, 2022 at 9:20 am

    How much??? $600. What?

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Equipment

Fujikura launches new Ventus TR Blue shafts for 2022 (plus a deep Q&A)

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FujikuraVentusTR

Fujikura’s family of Ventus shafts is undoubtedly one of the company’s best-performing, most popular and best-selling shaft lineups ever.

Back in September 2018, Fujikura launched the Ventus Blue shaft on the PGA Tour, finding immediate success for its ability to create speed without sacrificing stability. The secret sauce was a technology called “VeloCore,” which is a multi-material construction that uses ultra-stiff Pitch 70 Ton carbon fiber to increase stiffness.

The Ventus Blue allowed players to hit the center of the face more often due to a reduction in twisting and droop on the downswing.

As a mid-launch and mid-to-low launch shaft that provided speed and stability, the Ventus Blue fit the swings of most players. But, of course, there was demand for other models both in the market and on Tour. So, in September of the following year, Fujikura launched the Red (higher launch/higher spin) and Black (lower launch/lower spin) versions to appeal to the needs of different swings.

Fujikura’s arsenal of Ventus shafts allowed nearly any golfer across the swing spectrum to fit into one of the three options, including top tour players.

Although the Ventus shafts remain in the bags of tour players and perform well in the market, Fujikura has been working behind the scenes over the last several years to enhance performance.

After using its in-depth ENSO analytics and working closely with tour players, Fujikura has developed a new Ventus TR Blue shaft. Like the original Ventus Blue, the TR version is a mid-launch shaft, except it’s stiffer in the mid/handle section to improve stability and consistency of strike.

While VeloCore is still used throughout the Ventus TR shaft, the new construction features “Spread Tow” fabric in the butt-end section to increase torsional stiffness. Spread Tow, essentially, is a checkerboard-like design that weaves fibers together to increase strength and reduce weight. According to Fujikura, the torque is 10 percent stiffer in the section that uses this design.

Fujikura’s Product Marketing Manager, Spencer Reynolds, explains exactly what Spread Tow is and why it’s effective

“Essentially, there’s a standard carbon weave and then there’s a Spread Tow carbon weave. What a Spread Tow does is it takes all these individual strands of carbon and irons them flat into a tape, and then weaves those over-under, over-under almost like a checkerboard pattern. So there’s very little space for resin to accumulate, you get super low resin content, and then you also get a lot of strength in varying directions. It can take pull and load in multiple directions. Another benefit is that it’s super lightweight. You’re getting an incredible amount of strength, in an ultra-lightweight package.” (Read the Q&A later in the piece for way more insight from Reynolds on the Ventus TR).

For golfers, the new Ventus TR construction will lead to more stability at impact and during the backswing-downswing transition. In comparison to the original Ventus Blue, the Ventus TR will play slightly stiffer for lower spin but not quite as stiff as the Ventus Black.

Debuting a slightly new look, the Ventus TR has a lightweight phantium paint finish that glistens in the sunlight, and it has a gold “TR” block. Also, if you look closely at the butt-end section of the shaft, you can visibly see the Spread Tow woven technology. Fujikura has confirmed that the checkered design isn’t just a graphic — that’s a look into the real technology through the paint finish.

Described by Fujikura as a mid-launch, low-spin shaft, the Ventus TR comes in the following options: Ventus TR Blue 50 (R2, R and S flex), Ventus TR Blue 60 (R, S and X flex), Ventus TR Blue 70 (S and X flex) and Ventus TR Blue 80 (S and X flex), each of which are available at 46 inches.

Fujikura’s new Ventus TR Blue shafts will be available at over 600+ authorized retailers starting Feb. 1, 2022, selling for $350 apiece.

Fujikura Ventus TR: The inside story

For more on the Ventus TR, how it was designed, what it’s designed to do, and what the “TR” actually stands for, we talked with Spencer Reynolds, Product Marketing Manager at Fujikura.

Tursky: Simple question to start, what exactly is the Ventus TR shaft? What’s different about the new design?

Reynolds: Yeah, so on our end, for the last three years, really, people have been asking us what’s going to be next for Ventus, right? That’s kind of the curse and the blessing of having a really successful part. And the cool thing about Ventus is that it’s successful from the amateur level all the way to the PGA Tour. So you get tasked with these three things. 1) They want something new, 2) it needs to be better and 3) don’t change it. It’s kind of an awkward recipe to make new product.

So what we find is it’s a bit of a three-step process. It starts with taking a successful part and profile, and let’s listen to feedback. So we talk to tour pros, we’ll talk to charter dealers, we’ll talk to players and say, ‘Alright, if there was something about a particular profile that you’d want to change or enhance, what would it be?’

The luxury that we have is we take that feedback, and then we can kind of pair that up with our ENSO analytics. We have thousands of lines of different data and combinations of shaft builds, and how that interacts with different players, so we can pretty confidently say if we take this feedback, we make this change here, we make this section different, we make it softer or stiffer, whatever it is, we can look at an algorithm and look and past data and get a pretty good feel for how this is going to play out.

Then step three is, we find the right recipe, build prototypes, test it to death, and then roll it out to market. And that’s the super simplified version of it.

We got really nitpicky with Ventus, and one of the things we realized was that VeloCore technology is still an incredibly stable platform. So combine that incredibly stable core, incredibly ultra-stiff tip section, we have a lot of stability there. But what ENSO analytics showed us was, when a shaft goes into transition on the downswing, especially at higher swing speeds, but really for all swing speeds, that’s where a shaft takes on a lot of stress – unwanted stress, anytime there’s a quick change in direction. And we see that happen in the mid-handle section. That’s really where that occurs a lot.

Anytime we see that inconsistency in a shaft build, it can lead to unnecessary twist or unwanted twist. We want this piece from grip to tip to be as consistent as possible. So you start to look at specific sections now, and if this is a weak section or a section that can be compromised, how can we beef it up. Easy thing is we strap a bunch of material to it, right? But that doesn’t work because now you’re compromising swing weight, overall weight, and in a profile like a mid-launch, low-spin profile shaft like this, you’re really starting to compromise feel. You’re starting to push it much more into that handle-stiff, rebar, high swing speed space. This can live there with stiffer flexes and higher weights, but in that mid-low spin range, you want to maintain some of that feel.

So it leads us down a rabbit hole, how can we source new composites? How can we source new materials? How can we solve this problem? Well, we integrated a new Spread Tow carbon fabric.

Essentially, there’s a standard carbon weave and then there’s a Spread Tow carbon weave. What a Spread Tow does is it takes all these individual strands of carbon and irons them flat into a tape, and then weaves those over-under, over-under almost like a checkerboard pattern. So there’s very little space for resin to accumulate, you get super low resin content, and then you also get a lot of strength in varying directions. It can take pull and load in multiple directions. Other benefit is that it’s super lightweight. You’re getting an incredible amount of strength, in an ultra lightweight package.

Now we get away from that idea of compromising swing weight or overall weight, but when we measure this – we have a proprietary measurement system where we don’t just look at torque overall. We look at torque in every section of the shaft specifically. So what is the handle torque? What is the mid torque? What is the tip torque? And we compare that section to a Ventus Blue, and it jumps the torsional stiffness almost 10 percent in that specific section, which is a big chunk.

Tursky: What do these benefits equate to in real life for a golfer? 

Reynolds: The basic way to look at it is, you’re increasing consistency by that much more by increasing stability that much in a shaft. So any increase we see in stability, especially getting into double digits, it’s a huge gain.

What it really gives players, though, is you’re not really compromising player feel. So you’ve increased torsional stiffness in that section and made the shaft that much more consistent, without it feeling boardy or stiff in a particular section.

Tursky: So, in the handle section, you can see a checkerboard style graphic. Those are just graphics, right? You’re just highlighting the technology underneath? 

Reynolds: No, you’re seeing the material. That’s the material showing through, so you can actually see that under the Ventus decal, especially in the sunlight. When you see the checkerboard popping at you, there’s just a touch of paint over it. That’s the actual material on the part. So you will see some cool cosmetic changes on this, you will see a kind of sparkly blue finish that you can see when we’re in the sunshine. It’s got the added “TR” graphic to go in the label.

Tursky: What does the “TR” stand for?

Reynolds: It really doesn’t have a necessary meaning, but it has cool company history. We’ve had a TR part in the past in the Speeder TR. So, to us, it kind of means a lot of different things. In the past we’ve called the TR, we’ve called it tour rated, torsionally reinforced, we’ve come up with a million different acronyms, but truthfully it’s just kind of a brand name for us that has cool company history.

Tursky: I always thought it was “tour ready”…

Reynolds: Yeah, tour ready. We’ve gone through a litany of things. But for us, it’s kind of just a nod to our company history. And it helps it stand out just a little bit, too. As easy as the Ventus 2.0 would have been, we wanted to add some substance with it with a cool nod.

Tursky: In general, if I’m hitting an original Ventus against a Ventus TR, what are some things I can expect? 

Reynolds: Yeah, you’ll start to see some slight changes. We have integrated some stiffness to the profile. I would say that apples-to-apples, compared to a Blue, you may see some lower spin, certainly not as aggressive as Ventus Black. But it’s player dependent. We can look at a player profile on a spec chart and have a good idea of how it’s going to perform, but if you really want to know how it works for you, it’s always best case scenario to get fit, try it, try different combinations, and see what really sings for you.

Tursky: So, at least for now, there’s just a TR Blue?

Reynolds: There is. I know what your next question is. I’ll tell you this. Anytime we integrate a new technology that we see great success with, we absolutely explore it into other profiles. It’s absolutely in the consideration. And the cool things really from a design perspective with the TR, and we talked about this a little bit in a product last year, which was Speeder NX, we talked about a thing called variable torque. And we’ve really done a lot in that design space that we’re targeting these specific sections. What we found is that really is a powerful lever in adjusting shaft performance. Really targeting specific sections and talking about twisting profiles versus just E.I. profiles, whether that’s adding or subtracting material. Whatever it is, that idea of varying toque in specific sections is a space that we feel we’re just dipping our toe into and we’re really excited to run with. We’ve seen really cool results so far with the Ventus TR and we’re psyched about it.

 

 

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Srixon introduces new Z-Star Series Divide golf balls

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Srixon Golf has today announced the launch of the Z-Star Series Divide, with the Z-Star Divide and Z-Star XV Divide hitting retail on January 21st.

The balls arrive in a white/yellow color code, with the Z-Star Divide featuring a new FastLayer core that starts soft in the center and gradually becomes firm around its edge in design to give high-speed players excellent feel and ball speed. The Z-Star XV Divide contains a newly formulated inner core that bids to add resiliency for even more ball speed.

 “We are thrilled to be launching Z-Star Divide and Z-Star XV Divide. While they certainly stand out on the course, the performance benefits are what excite us the most. They’re so easy to align your putts, see flying through the air, and give great visual feedback on pitches and chips around the green.” – Brian Schielke, General Manager of Srixon North America

The latest additions from Srixon include all the tech within the Z-Star Series golf balls, including a high contract white and yellow thermoplastic urethane cover featuring SpinSkin with SeRM, a durable coating with flexible molecular bonds that digs deep into wedge and iron grooves, in design for maximum spin.

The balls also feature a 338 Speed Dimple Pattern with less drag and more lift in design to boost overall distance and provide a penetrating ball flight.

In addition, the new colorways on the Z-Star and Z-Star XV Divide are designed to allow players of all skill levels to track their spin, especially around the greens.

The Divide series arrives at retail on January 21st and cost $44.99 per dozen.

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The cleanest looking game improvement irons – GolfWRXers discuss

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In our forums, our members have been discussing clean looking game improvement irons. WRXer ‘SteelyDan’ kicks off the thread saying

“I am playing Mizzy JPX 919 forged but am looking for more forgiveness and launch in the longer irons. I tend to hit them fat. Guess the Hot Metals are the obvious choice but a least the 919 HM felt dead to me.

Any other recommendations with a clean look (no funky badges etc)? Doesn’t have to be the very latest model.”

And our members have been sharing their thoughts and suggestions in our forum.

Here are a few posts from the thread, but make sure to check out the entire discussion and have your say at the link below.

  • Carolina Golfer 2: “I like the looks of the Titleist T300 snd the upcoming Wilson D9 Forged look incredible.”
  • Lefty87: “I went directly from the 919F to PXG Gen 3 P. They have a very similar profile, but the PXG’s are longer, more forgiving, and have just as good of a feel, if not better than the 919F. Not to mention they are only $133 a stick right now, and they’ll be at your door in two weeks.”
  • chocolate_rehab: “I was going to say ZX4 – that’s more the SGI model from Srixon. ZX5 is more game improvement. As far as looks go for this sort of iron, ZX4 and Ping G710 are the cleanest and best looking imo.”
  • A.Princey: “Maltby DBMs or the equivalent, TE(more traditional loft).”

Entire Thread: “The cleanest looking game improvement irons”

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