Connect with us

Equipment

It might be a good idea to cut down your driver

Published

on

There are a lot of ways to adjust your clubs at home with some simple tools, and one of the easiest jobs for the DIY golfer is cutting down clubs, especially cutting down a driver, and installing a new grip.

Cutting down a driver will have a number of impacts including making the driver more accurate because at a shorter length it is easier to control and make contact in the middle of the face.

PGA Tour driver length

Bryson DeChambeau testing a longer driver

On the PGA Tour, the average driver length is 45″, even though some golfers like Bryson DeChambeau with a Cobra SpeedZone and Adam Scott with a Titleist TSi4 *Prototype, have recently experimented with drivers close to the 48″ USGA limit to help pick up extra speed. Even Phil Mickelson has transitioned to a 47.5″ driver for extra speed, and has been using it on the Champions Tour and recently at The Match 3.

The longer driver theory works well for stronger and highly skilled players because of their ability to control a longer and heavier club at higher speeds, but for average golfers and most recreational players, this extra length means bigger misses and doesn’t always lead to extra speed—this is why playing a shorter length can help most golfers.

More on PGA Tour driver length: PGATour.com – Are long drivers here to stay?

Buying a new Driver

If you are buying a new driver, you can custom order any length you want through your retailer and the driver will be adjusted before final assembly. If you are buying a “stock” driver, most in the marketplace are now between 45.5″ and 46″ and many golfers struggle to control the club at those lengths. This is why many golfers choose to cut down their stock driver after purchase between 1″ and 1.5″.

What happens when you cut down a driver

When you cut down any club, especially a driver, it will feel lighter without any adjustment because you have moved the mass of the club closer to your hands. Just like a fulcrum scale used to measure mass, the closer the mass—in this case, the driver’s head gets to the fulcrum of the scale, the lighter it will “feel” to the golfer—this is called swing weight.

Thanks to adjustable drivers, it is easy to get extra weights from a manufacturer to help the driver feel the same before it was cut down, and as a general rule, for every 1″ you cut, you have to replace 12g back into the head,

To get an idea of what swing weight is, check out the video below that covers the subject.

TXG Driver length test

To see a shorter driver put to the test, check out the video by the team at TXG, where they compare a standard length 45″ driver to a 43″ driver and how they compare for distance and accuracy.

 

 

 

 

Your Reaction?
  • 395
  • LEGIT55
  • WOW17
  • LOL8
  • IDHT5
  • FLOP11
  • OB5
  • SHANK31

Ryan Barath is a club-fitter & master club builder with more than 17 years of experience working with golfers of all skill levels, including PGA Tour players. He is the former Build Shop Manager & Social Media Coordinator for Modern Golf. He now works independently from his home shop and is a member of advisory panels to a select number of golf equipment manufacturers. You can find Ryan on Twitter and Instagram where he's always willing to chat golf, and share his passion for club building, course architecture and wedge grinding.

18 Comments

18 Comments

  1. Colin

    Feb 19, 2021 at 4:11 pm

    I’m still working on what suits me best but, a purple ice shaft 65gms stiff works better than regular. I like to feel the head so changed from weight from 2 to 8gms, but still a work in progress lol

  2. Rick James

    Dec 20, 2020 at 9:47 pm

    Having spent time w/ Launch Monitor outputs I realized neutral face to path w/ driver is where its all at and I could do that w/ shorter lengths. I found better zones of contact on the face too w/ shorter lengths too that helped reduce spin. I tried to use 2.51 yds per MPH of clubhead speed to gauge if the length was giving me efficient results. I found shorter length was consistent.

  3. PSG

    Dec 10, 2020 at 9:41 am

    This article is fine, except for the part where you say a player might not pick up extra speed.

    Every half-inch is worth around 1.5 mph, for everyone. They might not pick up distance (because they don’t hit the middle) but every single human on earth swings a 48″ lever faster than a 45″ lever. That part is a little misleading.

  4. Ryan Hurley

    Dec 9, 2020 at 2:37 pm

    I work as a club fitter and see so many people come in with the notion they need longer drivers to match their longer irons

  5. Griff

    Dec 8, 2020 at 10:52 am

    I went from a M3 at 45.75 to an Epic sub zero cut -1 inch to 44.5 and I hit it better than any driver I’ve ever had. Hitting it in the sweet spot more often…I’m longer and more accurate. Gone from a 8 to a 5 handicap. Distance is not the issue for me…squeezing another 10 yards out of a driver is irrelevant b/c most of the time I’m hitting some type of wedge into the green. If I’m in play I’m going to score well. I’ve always struggled with driver consistency and cutting it shorter has really changed things without any performance drop off.

  6. JK

    Dec 7, 2020 at 8:59 pm

    Yup – cut down my Cobra F9 driver to play 44 5/8. added some swing weight to get it to D1 & drove the ball better this year than last 5 years.

  7. Imafitter

    Dec 7, 2020 at 6:02 pm

    LOL! I’ve been advocating this for years, and before I just retired from fitting, I had every customer, especially seniors, try shorter shafts. My Ping G400MAX comes standard with a 45.75″ shaft & D3, and when I was fitted by Ping at the PGA Show, they recommended 45″, which I ordered. This summer for fun I replaced the shaft with a Mits Diamana at 44″ and experimented with the weight which is now D0. Not only am I hitting it straighter, but longer than most of my senior league (and the 45″ shaft)! Others have hit my driver and done the same or similar adjustments. Amateurs need to get fit, quit buying off the rack, and experiment with different lengths.

  8. Martin

    Dec 7, 2020 at 5:39 pm

    Its wrong. Its not 12 grams per inch. Its actually 1.6 gram per swing weight. Does it matter? Yes, to some it does, cause we are all different and some of us are extremely sensitive to even the slightest weight difference. So if you cut down a driver 1 inch you the swing weight becomes 6 weights lighter, so to figure out how many grams you need to add you need 6×1.6 grams added to the head of the driver.

    • Ted Noel

      Jan 11, 2021 at 9:49 am

      Actually, we aren’t sensitive to “swing weight.” We are sensitive to “Dynamic Moment of Inertia.” SW is only the functional equivalent of DMOI at identical club lengths. That means if you test 6-irons and find the one you like, your progressive length set will feel best at the 6-iron, and all the rest will feel less good. That’s because to keep DMOI the same through the irons, you need to change head weight by about 9 grams per 1/2 inch change in length. To keep SW the same, the change is about 7 grams per 1/2 inch. This is another reason single length irons work so well. They all feel the same, just like Bobby Jones’ clubs.

      Ultimately, the best measurement point for DMOI is from about 4″ from the butt end, which puts it between your hands, which is the physical hinge point. Using that point, I can match your entire set so that you won’t be able to tell which club you are swinging blindfolded.

      Issues of flex and torque are separate concerns from DMOI and SW.

  9. Mike C

    Dec 6, 2020 at 6:02 am

    By 2022 half the players on the PGA tour will be using a driver between 47”-48” long. Eventually 47 1/2 inches will be the standard on tour and for off the rack purchases. I’m currently experimenting with a 48 inch Krank driver. So far so good.

    • phizzy

      Jan 5, 2021 at 5:50 pm

      I’d like to see how straight you hit that driver, lol

  10. Charles Mclaughlin

    Dec 6, 2020 at 1:34 am

    You can also grip your club an inch or two lower.

    • Jay

      Dec 10, 2020 at 11:37 pm

      The problem with gripping down is you change the swing weight dramatically. When cutting down a driver, you want to restore the SW to your optimal.

  11. Tyler Durden

    Dec 5, 2020 at 1:45 pm

    Just cutting off some length off the butt of your driver is a good way to ruin a club

    • Alan Garner

      Dec 7, 2020 at 3:57 pm

      Agreed, gripping down is a far safer and prsctical way. I do this on tight fairways and when hitting into the wind. Then you have the option to grip back up when the fairway is wide open and there is little trouble to give the ball maximum pencil! #bombs

      • Tyler Durden

        Dec 8, 2020 at 4:22 pm

        Exactly. I once had a GBB 8 degree driver with a aldila Longwood shaft at 47.5”. I could crank drives out at the full length, and found that I could grip down to the grip end and be more consistent than with my 3 wood. In my infinite wisdom, I was choking down pretty much every tee shot, so I decided to just cut off an inch. Long story short, totally ruined the feel of the driver, and two more purchases of the longwood shaft didn’t recreate the original feel.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Whats in the Bag

Bubba Watson WITB 2021 (June)

Published

on

Driver: Ping G425 LST (9 degrees @7.5, 14g CG shifter in neutral, D3+)
Shaft: Grafalloy Bi-Matrix X AKA Project X Bubba Watson Prototype (tipped 1/2″, 44.5 inches)

 

5-wood: Ping G425 Max (14.5 degrees @14, neutral hosel setting, D2+)
Shaft: Fujikura Tour Spec Speeder 8.2 X (tipped 1.5 inch, 42 inches)

Irons: Ping S55 (3-PW; custom lie and lofts, 10 degrees open, D4 swingweight)
Shafts: True Temper Dynamic Gold X100 (.5″ standard length)

Wedges: Ping Glide 2.0 (52-SS @51, 56-SS @55, 60-TS)
Shafts: True Temper Dynamic Gold X100 (+1/2 inch)

Putter: Ping PLD Anser Prototype (blast finish, 34.25 inches, 21.5-degree lie, 4.5-degree loft, 350 grams)
Grip: Ping PP58 Midsize

Grips: Ping 703 Gold (between 11 and 15 wraps of tape under left hand, between 11 and 13 wraps under right across set)

Ball: Titleist Pro V1x

 

Your Reaction?
  • 5
  • LEGIT0
  • WOW0
  • LOL0
  • IDHT0
  • FLOP0
  • OB0
  • SHANK0

Continue Reading

Equipment

Miller Lite X Bettinardi unveil patriotic Fourth of July collection

Published

on

Miller Lite and Bettinardi Golf have teamed up to create a limited-edition collection dropping ahead of the Fourth of July, with the collection integrating iconic looks for each brand and featuring a patriotic red, white, and blue color palette.

The collaboration features two bespoke putters, along with putter headcovers, golf bags, wood headcovers, ball markers, divot tool, golf towel, golf polo shirt, hats, t-shirt, cooler, LED neon and koozies, with prices ranging from $35-$2,300.

“Miller Lite believes in authentic connections, and the golf course is an amazing place to bond with close friends for a few hours. With roots in the Midwest, we sought a golf partner who shared similar values and delivered a high-quality, dependable product. The partnership between Bettinardi Golf and Miller Lite is the perfect combination of fun, pride and mission to bring superior quality products when it comes to trusting what you drink and what you play with on the golf course.” – Jeff Schulman, marketing manager for Miller Lite.

The Fourth of July collection will be available from June 29 at 10 am CDT, at shop.MillerLite.com and Bettinardi.com in The Hive.

Your Reaction?
  • 3
  • LEGIT0
  • WOW0
  • LOL1
  • IDHT0
  • FLOP0
  • OB0
  • SHANK1

Continue Reading

Equipment

Addressing club fitting’s biggest myth: It’s only for good players

Published

on

By far, one of the biggest misconceptions among golfers is that club fitting is only helpful to the most skilled who can really “tell the difference.” This couldn’t be further from the truth. Getting fit for a set of clubs is no different than getting fit for a suit or a dress — everybody can benefit from having something tailored just for them, whether it be simple adjustments or a full-blown bespoke experience.

To break down one of the club fitting world’s greatest myths, we have teamed up with Club Champion to help you better understand how the process can help you have more fun and play better golf.

What are the benefits of a club fitting for any level of golfer?

  • For higher handicap and more beginner golfers, a club fitting helps to eliminate unnecessary variables that work against you on the course and while practicing. Especially for beginners or people taking lessons, it’s imperative to have equipment that works with your body, not against it. The right clubs prevent you from having to compensate for things like lengths that are too short or grips that are the wrong size.
  • By working with a fitter, a golfer will get a better understanding of how his/her body and natural swing motion relate to their equipment.
  • A fitting will help any golfer find out exactly what they need to achieve their specific performance or scoring goals.
  • Fittings lead to lower scores, more distance, better dispersion, and a lot of other benefits whether you’re a high handicapper or a scratch golfer. The reason pros tinker with their clubs all the time is because details matter.
  • It’s not just about making your best shots better, it’s about making your worst shots more playable. This applies across all skill levels, and the more a fitter can help keep the ball closer to the intended target, the quicker you are going to see results on the course and on your scorecard.

How does a less skilled golfer specifically benefit from a club fitting?

  • The interesting thing is higher handicaps actually benefit more since there tends to be more low-hanging fruit that fitters can adjust that help them see instant results. In a way, it’s like making sure you have the right size bike, if you try to ride a poorly fit bike you will always struggle, but as soon as you have the right fit — you’re flying.
  • As mentioned above, a fitting helps beginners by removing obstacles that work against their natural swing motion.
  • We fit a lot of golfers and generally, there’s an education gap with higher handicaps in terms of what technology is out there to help their game. We’ve had people come in with 20-year-old clubs who don’t know what sort of clubs are available in the market now and how much easier newer clubs can be to hit. If we use players on the lower end of the speed spectrum as an example – in the last 5 years have we seen a huge improvement in lighter weight shaft technology.
  • We see some of the biggest gains with putters, a club many golfers really don’t think that much about when it comes to fitting. Most golfers just buy the style that suits their eye, not their stroke, so there are massive improvements to be had on the green. It could be a whole new putter or just a grip and length change but when you consider how many shots you take make on the greens, a 15-20 percent improvement can be a game-changer.

How does something on the level of a “basic” fitting help golfers over using off the rack?

  • Small details like shaft flex, length, and swing weight play a huge factor in success, and when you buy off the rack you’re just guessing on how those and many other factors will work for you.
  • Even just having your existing set adjusted will lead to better golf. Even if it’s not absolutely optimized, small tweaks are a lot more benficial than off the rack clubs built for the masses.
  • No golfer is truly “average” in the sense that everyone’s body is so different. Height, swing motion, strength/speed, attack angle, etc. all of these things change from person-to-person, even if everyone in the test group is the same handicap. Lastly, stock clubs are mass-produced, which can lead to inconsistencies throughout the set and those variables can be addressed and eliminated even with a basic fitting.
Your Reaction?
  • 7
  • LEGIT0
  • WOW1
  • LOL1
  • IDHT1
  • FLOP3
  • OB0
  • SHANK2

Continue Reading

WITB

Facebook

Trending