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SPOTTED: Srixon “Z785” and “Z585” irons

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Photos have recently popped up in our GolfWRX Forums of Srixon “Z785” and “Z585” irons. It’s been nearly two years since the company released it’s previous Z565, Z765 and Z965 irons, so it’s possible (if not likely), based on nomenclature, these could be the replacements for that series.

The photos in our forums show Z785 short irons (5-PW) and Z785 long irons (4 and 3), but it does not appear that the Z785 irons shown in the photos are driving irons, so it’s likely these photos come from a mixed set.

We do not have any official tech or release information about new irons from Srixon at this time, so we’re left to speculate for the time being. What do you think about the photos of these Srixon “Z785” and “Z585” irons?

Check out the photos of each below, and click here for more photos and discussion.

Srixon “Z785” irons

 

Srixon “Z585” irons

Click here for more photos and discussion.

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31 Comments

31 Comments

  1. John

    Jul 20, 2018 at 4:47 pm

    How about a lefty gap wedge this time?

  2. ray

    Jul 20, 2018 at 9:14 am

    Best looking 7 series yet. Hated the look of the last ones so much I got rid of them. Couldn’t get past the gray stripe and the muscle toward the toe look of the 765. This one has the muscle more centered looking and no dumb stripe YES!!!

  3. KT89

    Jul 19, 2018 at 11:43 pm

    ogo do you have anything positive to add to anything being said? Some great openings for some solid discussion here and you managed to trash or belittle everyone you’ve responded to. Are you playing on TV but we just don’t know it? No? Bring it down a few notches and humble yourself a bit.

    • Shinton

      Jul 20, 2018 at 9:46 am

      Oh don’t worry about Ogo, he’s just trying to flex his finger muscles on here(prolly can’t get it done on the course). He is obviously much superior than any one else willing to give an opinion. We should all kneel in honor and submit to his excellence!

    • BD

      Jul 20, 2018 at 10:33 am

      Ogo is just a troll. Whatever he says has no merit.

  4. ogo

    Jul 19, 2018 at 2:38 pm

    Are these Srixon Z’s fully hot forged like Mizunos…. or are they just cheap castings that are stamped or cold coin forged that only minutely changes the surface grain structure? Biiiig difference!!! 😮

    • Hintongolf

      Jul 19, 2018 at 4:50 pm

      I play the Z965s 3-pw and can tell you they feel every bit as good as the Mizuno irons, nothing cheap about Srixon irons.

      • ogo

        Jul 19, 2018 at 11:13 pm

        Your ‘feeeel’ is irrelevant to the issue of the clubhead construction. In all likelihood your ‘feeeel’ is faulty or non-existent and thus worthless opinion. Keep your subjective feeeel to yourself.

        • Harambe

          Jul 19, 2018 at 11:31 pm

          they are endo forged. these feel softer than mizuno. 1020 carbon steel vs 1025. endo and miura are the best foundries in the game

        • Funkaholic

          Jul 20, 2018 at 12:08 pm

          That is an arrogant and uninformed comment. Those of us who know what “feel” means in a quality forged iron, value the subtle differences in feel. Materials, forging process and design all come together to create an experience for the player.

  5. bonifacj

    Jul 19, 2018 at 1:00 pm

    I still bag the z745s. Best looking, feeling and performing irons I have ever used. Not sure how Srixon could top them.

  6. Jim McPherson

    Jul 19, 2018 at 11:10 am

    I like what Srixon has done with the more player irons in the 7 & 9 series. No cheap looking plastic bling badges! Keep up the good work. Keep the back of the club clean and only the steel. Badges? We don’t need no stinking badges!

    #noironbadges

    • rondon

      Jul 19, 2018 at 12:38 pm

      These thick-faced cavity back irons may appeal to pros and good ams, but the huge majority of rec’n golfers will be playing hollow irons within 5 years. Hollow is hotter off the face and higher trajectories. It’s over for solid irons.

      • Funkaholic

        Jul 20, 2018 at 12:17 pm

        You obviously don’t know what you are talking about.

  7. Chilly Dipper

    Jul 19, 2018 at 7:18 am

    LMK when you spot a left handed 985…

  8. Brad

    Jul 19, 2018 at 6:42 am

    I much prefer the cleaner look of the z765 and the z745 irons before them. Not really a fan of the stepped cavity look on the z785 or the bling bling badging in the cavity of the new z585’s.

    I’ve had my eye on a set of z765’s for while and I might just have to go buy a set before they are replaced with these…their uglier cousins.

  9. Tom

    Jul 19, 2018 at 12:55 am

    There hasn’t been anything new in irons since the Ping Eye II…..blades or perimeter weighted….manufacturers just keep changing the back cavities cosmetically….gotta introduce a new model every year…Re-grip your old irons, you will probably hit them just as well as any of these “new” models.

    • Dave

      Jul 19, 2018 at 9:35 am

      except for tungsten weighting in heel and toe, sole changes especially in these to help turf interaction, power holes in wilsons make toe shots exactly like pured shots, slots in taylormade improve forgiveness on thin shots, some cast irons feel exactly like forged, oh and many sets have improved distance dramatically. pxg,taylormade, ping have polymer filled cavitys which produce great distance for those that need it, other than that they are all just metal.

      • rondon

        Jul 19, 2018 at 12:34 pm

        Don’t forget the hollow irons like PXG and P790s that are proving superior to traditional cavity back clubs. It’s the thin face on the hollow irons that make them better than thick face cavity backs. Pros can play the blades but the rec’n golfer market is hollow irons.

    • Rob Pfeil

      Jul 19, 2018 at 3:03 pm

      Except that Ping says the iBlades have a higher MOI than the Ping Eye 2’s. So those old irons aren’t as good as you think.

      • ogo

        Jul 19, 2018 at 11:21 pm

        A higher MOI means more inertia built into the clubhead… and that makes them harder to supinate through impact. Unless you desperately need more MOI in the head to compensate for your horrid off-center hits? The iBlades are admission of incompetence.

    • Herbert

      Jul 20, 2018 at 6:48 pm

      So True.

  10. rondon

    Jul 19, 2018 at 12:29 am

    Are these irons hollow? If they aren’t hollow they are an obsolete design.

    • carl

      Jul 19, 2018 at 10:00 am

      man, not sure what these companies are doing still creating all these obsolete designs. And whats with all those pga tour players that have obsolete designed blades in the bag

      • rondon

        Jul 19, 2018 at 12:30 pm

        With the hollow iron designs like PXG and P790s all the old designs will fade away because only pros can play true blades. The club companies will force the pros to play the hollow clubs if they want to get paid. It’s all about selling clubs to rec golfers.

    • Hintongolf

      Jul 19, 2018 at 10:09 am

      hahahahaha this is too funny, “if they aren’t hollow they are an obsolete design.” The Z785 aren’t designed for the golfer with an ego who plays from the wrong tees and in turn needs clubs to hit the ball further and straighter for them. These are designed with the lower handicap golfer in mind, those who are looking for better ball control and shot shape with a little help on slight mishits.

      • rondon

        Jul 19, 2018 at 12:27 pm

        OK…. if that’s the case then Srixon can expect to sell a thousand sets only because good amateurs and rec golfers will be playing PXG and P790s…. hollow clubs.

    • Funkaholic

      Jul 20, 2018 at 12:15 pm

      What is your obsession with hollow irons? Are you one of those PXG fanboys (the most overpriced, overrated clubs on the market)? I will always prefer a forged cavity or muscle back blade over any hollow iron.

  11. Travis

    Jul 19, 2018 at 12:05 am

    I like what I see so far!

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Equipment

Ben Hogan adds Ft. Worth “White” to iron lineup

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After the launch of Diamond Black Metal finish Ft. Worth “Black” irons earlier this year, Ben Hogan’s nickel-chrome Ft. Worth irons are back…sort of. The Texas-baed company today announced the launch of Ben Hogan Ft. Worth White irons.

Now with respect to the “White” designation, If you’re skeptical/confused, well, let’s just have a look at a comment on BH’s Instagram post announcing the iron launch and the company’s response…

jonmodica: “Very unclear the changes from previous model… also… white? It’s chrome…..”

Benhogangolf: ”@jonmodica More progressive specific to each club head, a more aggressive V-Sole pattern and the ‘white’ is opposite of the popular and newly designed Ft. Worth Black.”

There you have it, folks. “White” as in contrast to the Ft. Worth Black irons, and the Ft. Worth White is not merely a re-issue of original chrome Ft. Worth, according to the company.

With respect to the changes to the V-Sole system, the company said this in its marketing materials for the Ft. Worth Black.

“Feedback from strong players and robot testing indicated that the leading edge could be increased on certain irons, and trailing edge softened … especially with less-than-full shots in the shorter irons.”

“So, in our ongoing quest to design and manufacture the best clubs in golf, we’ve modified the V-Sole Technology used on the Ben Hogan Ft. Worth BLACK slightly. The sole maintains the same basic design principles as the original V-Sole but has been optimized for each iron in the set. In effect, we’ve strengthened the leading edge from the sole to the face on some of the Ft. Worth BLACK irons, while reducing the trailing edge bounce on others.”

Obviously, the company scrapped the PreciseLoft system introduced with the original Ft. Worth irons. That system offered four loft profiles, all with consistent four-degree gaps. After finding the vast majority of players preferred the “mid-high” launch profile, the company did away with the others…and returned to tradition iron number (rather than loft) stamping on the toe.

The aforementioned lofts in the 4-PW set range from 22 degrees to 46 degrees.

“The Ft. Worth White Irons are illustrative of how Ben Hogan Golf Equipment Company interacts with and listens to its customers,” said Scott White, President and CEO, Ben Hogan Golf Equipment Company. “On the heels of our sales success with the Ft. Worth Black Irons, we found many ‘traditionalists’ who wanted to play this iron design with the standard nickel-chrome finish, so we accommodated them with this launch.”

Ft. Worth White irons are available for purchase on the Ben Hogan website exclusively for $700.00 per seven-piece set (4-PW).

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Equipment

Ping’s new Sigma2 putters are length-adjustable, and one of them “fetches” the ball from the hole

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We recently spotted photos of Ping’s new Sigma2 putter line in our GolfWRX forums, but what we didn’t know at the time was that there is an adjustable-length system built into their Pistol grips.

The USGA conforming, length-adjustable feature allows golfers to change lengths between 32 and 36 inches in approximately 0.25-inch increments with a turn of the small Ping wrench that fits into the butt end of the grips.

“The adjustable shaft is just a really cool technology,” said John K. Solheim, Ping President. “Our engineers took a very complex technical challenge and simplified it for the benefit of golfers. It allows you to experiment with various lengths and ultimately self-fit yourself. You’re no longer limited to a specific length measurement. You simply adjust it until you’re comfortable, ideally with your eyes directly over the ball. We call it ‘invisible’ technology but once you customize it to your length, the results will be very clear on your scorecard.”

Also, we’ve since learned that the Sigma2 Fetch putter head fits into a standard size golf hole, and the design allows golfers to simply place the bottom of the putter head into the hole to pick the golf ball out without bending over.

Each of the 9 new head models in the Sigma2 line have a new face technology as well, made to be softer and more responsive than the Sigma G putter faces. The “dual-durometer” face inserts, which are made of PEBAX material, have a softer outer layer, and a firmer inner layer, designed for greater player feedback, according to Ping.

Additionally, Ping’s familiar TR face design pattern alters in depth across the face to speed up mishits — the goal being to have greater speed consistency regardless of where the golfer strikes the ball on the face.

The Sigma2 putters, which are now available for pre-order at Ping golf shops around the world, are offered with either the PP60 (midsize and lightweight), the PP61 (inspired by the PP58), or the PP62 (larger, more rounded shape) grip, which are each equipped with the length-adjustable system.

Read below for full specs of each putter, as per Ping’s press release.

See more photos and discussion about the Sigma2 putters here.

Ping Sigma2 Anser

Putter Type: Blade
Finish: Platinum or Stealth
Head Weight: 350 grams
Stroke Type: Slight Arc
Lie Angle: 20 degrees (+/- 4)
Loft: 3 degrees (+/- 2)
Price: $215

Ping Sigma2 ZB 2

Putter Type: Blade
Finish: Platinum
Head Weight: 350 grams
Stroke Type: Strong Arc
Lie Angle: 20 degrees (+/- 4)
Loft: 3 degrees (+/-2)
Price: $215

Ping Sigma2 Kushin C

Putter Type: Mid-Mallet
Finish: Platinum
Head Weight: 360 grams
Stroke Type: Straight
Lie Angle: 20 degrees (+/- 4)
Loft: 3 degrees (+/-2)
Price: $215

Ping Sigma2 Arna

Putter Type: Mid-Mallet
Finish: Stealth
Head Weight: 360 grams
Stroke Type: Slight Arc
Lie Angle: 20 degrees (+/-4)
Loft: 3 degrees (+/-2)
Price: $215

Ping Sigma2 Tyne

Putter Type: Mallet
Finish: Stealth
Head Weight: 365 grams
Stroke Types: Straight, Slight Arc
Lie Angle: 20 degrees (+/-2)
Loft: 3 degrees (+/-2)
Price: $235

Ping Sigma2 Tyne 4

Putter Type: Mallet
Finish: Platinum
Head Weight: 370 grams
Stroke Type: Strong Arc
Lie Angle: 20 degrees (+/-4)
Loft: 3 degrees (+/-2)
Price: $235

Ping Sigma2 Wolverine H

Putter Type: Mallet
Finish: Stealth
Head Weight: 370 grams
Stroke Type: Slight Arc
Lie Angle: 20 degrees (+/- 4)
Loft: 3 degrees (+/-2)
Price: $235

Ping Sigma2 Valor

Putter Type: Mallet
Finish: Stealth
Head Weight: 365 grams
Stroke Types: Straight, Slight Arc
Lie Angle: 20 degrees (+/-2)
Loft: 3 degrees (+/-2)
Price: $235

Ping Sigma2 Fetch

Putter Type: Mallet
Finish: Platinum
Head Weight: 365 grams
Stroke Type: Straight
Lie Angle: 20 degrees (+/-2)
Loft: 3 degrees (+/-2)
Price: $235

See what GolfWRX Members are saying about the Ping Sigma2 putters.

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Whats in the Bag

Marc Leishman’s Winning WITB: 2018 CIMB Classic

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Driver: Callaway Rogue (9 degrees)
Shaft: Fujikura Speeder 757 Evolution IV X-Flex

Fairway Woods: Callaway Rogue Sub Zero (15 and 18 degrees)
Shafts: Fujikura Motore Speeder Tour Spec VC 9.2X

Irons: Callaway X-Forged 2018 (3-9 irons)
Shafts: Nippon N.S. Pro Modus3 130X

Wedges: Callaway Mack Daddy 4 (48 and 54 degrees), Titleist Vokey SM7 (58 degrees)
Shafts: Nippon N.S. Pro Modus3 130X

Putter: Odyssey Versa #1 Wide (Red)

Golf Ball: Callaway Chrome Soft X

See what GolfWRX Members are saying about Leishman’s clubs.

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