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Spotted: Titleist’s new Vokey SM7 wedges

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As promised by Bob Vokey on our new 19th Hole podcast (around the 19-minute mark), Titleist has unveiled its new Vokey SM7 wedges at the Shriner Hospitals for Children Open in Las Vegas. We have so many in-hand photos of the new wedges they needed to be broken up into two photo albums; here’s Part 1 and Part 2 of the photos.

SM6 (left) vs new SM7

VokeySM7wedgesWRX

From the photos, we can tell that Titleist is sticking with it’s progressive center of gravity (CG) design that was featured in its SM6 wedges, highlighted by the curves on the back cavities of the new SM7 wedges. Although in this year’s model — at least when comparing the 46-degree F Grinds — it appears the curve is going in the opposite direction, possibly relocating the CG for different launch, flight characteristics and spin.

Among some aesthetic changes, such as the placement of grind stampings, Titleist is also apparently introducing a new “D” grind into this lineup. Some GolfWRX members speculate it could stand for “Dill,” as in Titleist’s PGA Tour rep and grind master Aaron Dill, or as in PGA Tour player and major champion Jason Dufner, who uses a unique grind in his wedges.

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We’ll be on the lookout for more information on design, specs and release dates for the new SM7 wedges, but for now, enjoy the photos from Las Vegas.

More Photos of the SM7 wedges

Discussion: See what GolfWRX members are saying about the SM7 wedges in Pt. 1 and Pt. 2 in our forums

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21 Comments

21 Comments

  1. Acew7iron

    Oct 31, 2017 at 2:50 pm

    jwowzer…ban is for USGA sanctioned events and amateurs can play the old grooves until 2022. guess your a pro though, so don’t you already have the SM8s?

    By then Ill have the face as smooth as babys bottom and ready to buy a 6 yo SM7 inlike new condition for $25

  2. Dan

    Oct 31, 2017 at 1:42 pm

    Looks great!! I really wish Bob will produce the entire Iron range with his wedge design before he retires.

  3. Bob Jacobs

    Oct 31, 2017 at 12:53 pm

    looks like just another wedge to me…tough to get all that excited

  4. C.B.

    Oct 31, 2017 at 3:04 am

    No CBs? Where’s the Cleveland copy from Titleist? I need to make my AP1 set complete and I need a set of AP1 type wedge in SW and LW. lol

  5. TigerMom

    Oct 30, 2017 at 8:39 pm

    The SM6 looks frowny 🙁 and the SM7 looks smiley 🙂

  6. ronnie

    Oct 30, 2017 at 8:34 pm

    Awesome Vokey’s and I want them in my Fantasy WITB

  7. Acew7iron

    Oct 30, 2017 at 5:09 pm

    So I just purchased a 06 model Vokey 200 series 60 deg wedge off ebay for $25 in like new condition.

    What is *better about this one than what Im bagging?

    • Steve

      Oct 30, 2017 at 5:39 pm

      It’s Vokey/Titleist “brand new” and the latest shiny bright Vokey Design.
      Yours is old and second hand and has no new mojo designed into it by Vokey Design.
      Otherwise, there is no significant difference if you are a decent golfer and you don’t flaunt your WITB.

    • Jwowzer

      Oct 30, 2017 at 5:41 pm

      The SM7 wedges are conforming to the rules, whereas yours is not. Hope you don’t plan on playing in any events ever.

      • Dat

        Oct 30, 2017 at 8:45 pm

        jwowzer…ban is for USGA sanctioned events and amateurs can play the old grooves until 2022. guess your a pro though, so don’t you already have the SM8s?

        • Chuck

          Oct 31, 2017 at 4:21 am

          2024 actually. And even then, the decision of the USGA might be to just let it go anyway.

          Remember that the old grooves have never been made illegal. The USGA imposed its rule only on wedges built after a certain date. (After 12/31/10, if memory serves me.) And only via a “condition of competition,” which the USGA recommends be utilized only in elite-level competitions.

          • Darryl

            Nov 16, 2017 at 7:53 am

            As I’m given to understand also, the onus is on the tournament committee to prove your club is non conforming, which means they need to have the (no doubt very expensive) test rig.

            Someone may correct me on that.

            Either way my Mizuno TP 2000’s are good until 2024 :-))

  8. Stinger26

    Oct 30, 2017 at 4:51 pm

    still no forged offerings. much of the same.

    • The dude

      Oct 30, 2017 at 8:45 pm

      Why do you want a forged wedge?.

      • Steve Sands

        Oct 30, 2017 at 10:44 pm

        Everybody wants a Forged wedge….why don’t you? We’ve been asking Vokey forever, and he makes them for the Japanese market which is much smaller than the USA market. Have you ever hit a Callaway X Forged wedges flush or a Mizuno MP series? There is no comparing a Forged wedge to the cast.

        • The dude

          Oct 31, 2017 at 8:50 am

          ….I knew you’d say that….point is..you don’t know the difference…(don’t bother saying you do)….with a high lofted club…it’s almost impossible to distinguish. And Cast has the benefit of durability for amateurs. Also…Why do you think so many tour players use Vokes?

        • Pat

          Dec 8, 2017 at 11:24 am

          Steve Sands, cost. Would you buy a set of 3 wedges at $350 each JUST because they’re forged?

  9. Geof

    Oct 30, 2017 at 3:51 pm

    this is a joke!

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Equipment

SPOTTED: PXG 0311T “Gen2” irons

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After spotting Charles Howell III testing a PXG XXF prototype driver on Monday at the 2018 CareerBuilder Challenge, we spotted CHIII and Zach Johnson testing PXG 0311T “Gen2” irons on Tuesday.

The original 0311T irons, which were released in 2015, were the Tour versions of the initial 0311 irons from PXG. The 0311T irons, while injected with the same thermoplastic elastomer (TPE) material that made PXG’s 0311 irons special, had smaller profiles, thinner toplines and soles, and less offset. They catered more to the Tour player than the original 0311 iron release, but still had the familiar PXG look with screws around the perimeter.

The PXG 0311T “Gen2” irons we spotted on Tuesday at the CareerBuilder have a slightly different look than the original 0311T irons. See if you can spot the differences below.

PXG 0311T “Gen2” 4-iron vs an original 0311T 4-iron

There’s a more accordion-like look on the back cavity of the 0311T Gen2 iron (left), and it seems the overall center of gravity (CG) may be lower in the club head on the Gen2 irons, as well. At least, it appears the club has a lower overall profile. It also appears the 7-screws near the sole wrap less around the toe portion in the Gen2 iron on the left, and there’s one less screw on the high toe portion of the Gen2 irons; possibly another notch in the lower-CG column.

What do you think of the PXG0311T “Gen2” irons that we spotted on Tuesday? See what GolfWRX members are saying about them in our forums.

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SPOTTED: A PXG “XXF prototype” driver in Charles Howell III’s bag

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In December, we spotted a PXG XXF driver, along with two other PXG drivers, on the USGA conforming clubs list. Flash forward to Monday at the 2018 CareerBuilder Challenge, we spotted an XXF prototype driver in person in the bag of PXG staffer and club-tinkerer Charles Howell III.

We are told the XXF driver in CHII’s bag is only a prototype, and that it may never actually be released to the public.

As we originally postulated, it seems from the layout of the weights, or screws, that the XXF prototype is a fade-biased driver; that’s because there are three screws out on the toe portion of the sole, but none on the heel portion. We also guessed that the PXG ZZ has a neutral bias and the PXG XX is a draw-biased driver.

The last official driver release from PXG was a line of 0811X drivers that introduced thermoplastic elastomer inserts into the soles of the drivers to help lower center of gravity — making the drivers more forgiving and spin less — and to dampen vibrations, enhancing sound and feel. Since we haven’t cut open the XXF prototype driver we spotted in CHIII’s bag, we don’t know whether it also has a TPE insert in the sole. But, if the material lowered CG in the 0811X drivers, it’s likely the material would make it’s way into the XXF prototype driver in some capacity to achieve similar results.

From the photos, CHIII is testing the XXF prototype driver with a Mitsubishi Tensei CK Blue shaft. We’ll keep an eye out to see whether he puts the driver into play this week, and we’ll update you with more information on the XXF driver if it becomes available.

Discussion: See what GolfWRX members are saying about the PXG XXF driver in our forums

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Callaway launches new Rogue, Rogue Sub Zero and Rogue Draw drivers, and fairway woods

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With its Jailbreak technology, Callaway’s GBB Epic drivers were the No. 1-selling drivers in the United States in 2017; actually, according to Callaway, they were the No. 1-selling drivers every month in the U.S. in 2017.

How do you back that up? How do you replace a driver that’s been so successful?

Well, apparently you don’t.

Callaway’s new Rogue, Rogue Sub Zero and Rogue Draw drivers, as Callaway says, do not replace its GBB Epic and GBB Epic Sub Zero drivers of last year. Instead, Rogue is an all-new line that improves on the Epic technologies, but the company will continue to sell its Epic drivers.

Actually, if you follow Callaway’s trends over recent years, you may realize that the company should be coming out with an XR 18 line of drivers and fairway woods. That’s not the case, however. In this sense, Callaway is “going rogue.” Company representatives say that with the new Rogue drivers and fairway woods, the company is “doing what the industry is not expecting us to do.” This means that instead of coming out with an XR 18 driver at a price point of say $379, it is launching the Rogue drivers at $499.99 and packing them with improved-upon technologies than were in the Epic drivers, for more forgiveness and better aerodynamics. Callaway also says “the XR line is done for us.”

The original Jailbreak technology in the Epic drivers consisted of two titanium bars that sat behind the face; the idea is that the bars gave the structure more strength, or stiffened the crown and sole, to allow the faces to be made thinner, and therefore faster, without sacrificing durability. But with the Rogue drivers, Callaway wanted to save weight from these bars in order to displace the weight elsewhere (re: lower and more rearward in the head for more forgiveness). So Callaway’s engineers designed new hourglass-shaped Jailbreak bars, which are thinner in the middle portions of the titanium bars, and thicker near the crown and sole. This allowed the company to save 25 percent of the weight from the Jailbreak design without sacrificing the benefits of higher ball speeds across the face. You’ll notice from address (in the photo below) that the body looks a bit more stretched out than the Epic drivers; that’s to drive CG (center of gravity) more rearward to raise MOI (moment of inertia, a measure of forgiveness). The new hourglass design allowed that to be possible, as well getting rid of the weight-shifting track in the rear of the sole, as seen on the Epic drivers.

Callaway’s Rogue drivers, unlike the GBB Epic drivers, use the Boeing aero package — equipped with speed trips on the crown and an overall more aerodynamic shape — that the company introduced in the XR 16 drivers. The Rogue drivers also use a new X Face VFT technology that uses variable face thicknesses across the face to boost ball speeds on off-center strikes. The triaxial carbon crowns of the Rogue, which Callaway calls it’s largest carbon crowns ever, also save weight from the top of the club that is displaced lower in the heads to drive CG lower and more rearward.

The overall result is 0.6 mph more club head speed from the Rogue drivers compared to the GBB Epic, according to Callaway, and a 16 percent tighter dispersion.

There are three different models in the Rogue driver series: Callaway Rogue, Rogue Sub Zero and Rogue Draw. The relationship between the Rogue and Rogue Sub Zero is the same as it was between the GBB Epic and the GBB Epic Sub Zero, with the standard version having a larger profile and more shallow face, while the Sub Zero is a bit lower-spinning with a more compact look and a deeper face. The Rogue Sub Zero has two interchangeable weights (2 grams and 14 grams) that produces about 200 rpm of change between the two settings, according to Callaway.

The new Rogue Draw, with a 5-gram screw in the sole toward the heel, and with additional internal heel wighting, is for those golfers who want to fix their slice. The GBB Epic driver, with the 17-gram weight all the way in heel, hit the golf ball 11 yards left of center, according to Callaway’s testing. The Rogue Draw hits it 18 yards left of center. That means the Rogue Draw will draw the ball 7 yards farther than a GBB Epic set to draw.

The Rogue, Rogue Sub Zero and Rogue Draw drivers will be available at retail on February 9 for $499.99 each. Callaway Customs will also be available on each of the drivers in March. See below for more information on stock shafts, and keep reading for info on the fairway woods.

Discussion: See what GolfWRX Members are saying about the Rogue drivers and fairways in our forums

Callaway Rogue driver

Stock shafts for the standard Rogue range from 40-70 gram options, including Aldila’s Synergy and Quaranta shafts, and Project X’s EvenFlow and HZRDUS Yellow shafts.

Callaway Rogue Sub Zero driver

Stock shafts for the Rogue Sub Zero range from 50-70 gram options, including Aldila’s Synergy, Project X’s EvenFlow, and Project X’s HZRDUS Yellow.

Callaway Rogue Draw driver

The Rogue Draw is available in 9, 10.5 and 13 degree lofts. Stock shafts include the same offerings as the standard Rogue model, which include Aldila’s Synergy and Quaranta shafts, and Project X’s EvenFlow and HZRDUS Yellow shafts.

Callaway Rogue and Rogue Sub Zero fairway woods

Callaway’s Epic fairway woods did not have Jailbreak technology, but the Rogue fairways do. Also, unlike the hourglass-Jailbreak that’s in the Rogue drivers, the Rogue fairway woods do not have the hourglass shape, and they’re made from steel instead of titanium. According to Callaway, while it wanted to make the Jailbreak technology lighter in the drivers, it actually wanted to make it heavier in the fairways, thus they’re made from steel and do not have the weight-saving hourglass shape.

Jailbreak in the Rogue fairway woods combines with Callaway’s familiar Face Cup technology. The Rogue fairway woods faces are made from “ultra-thin” Carpenter 455 steel, and the Face Cup is designed to boost ball speeds on off-center hits. Additionally, the Rogue fairways use Callaway’s Internal Standing Wave to position CG low-and-forward for high launch and low spin, they use triaxial carbon crowns to save weight from the top portions of the club to also shift CG lower, and they use the Boeing aero package for more club head speed.

The Rogue Sub Zero fairway woods, which have more compact shapes and deeper faces, also have a 5-gram weight in the forward portion of their soles in order to driver CG even more forward. This design will help high-spin golfers lower spin for more distance.

The Rogue and Rogue Sub Zero fairway woods will sell for $299.99 each starting on February 9. See below for shaft details.

Callaway Rogue fairway wood

Callaway says the Rogue fairways (13.5, 15, 17, 19, 20, 21, 23 and 25 degrees) are available in multiple premium shafts and weights ranging from 40-80 grams.

Callaway Rogue Sub Zero fairway wood

Callaway says the Rogue Sub Zero fairways (13.5, 15 and 18 degrees) are available in multiple premium shaft brands ranging from 60-80 grams.

Discussion: See what GolfWRX Members are saying about the Rogue drivers and fairways in our forums

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