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Swingbyte for Google Glass offers hands-free swing data

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Swingbyte, an innovative, lightweight swing analyzer we have covered here and here on GolfWRX, today becomes the second golf-related app to release Glassware for Google Glass. With the Swingbyte and Google Glass, a pair of internet-connected glasses with an optical display, golfers now have instant, hands-free access to their Swingbyte data such as swing speed, club face angle, swing path and more.Device-Side-White-Faded_large

Wearable technology, especially when it comes to sports, has been on fire lately, and demand and innovation is only expected to keep getting hotter. Google Glass specifically has been spotted in videos from the PGA Tour as early as last year, but momentum has picked up recently with many players putting on Glass to give fans a player’s eye view while they play a practice round. While it isn’t legal to use Glass during official tournament play, Glass is almost perfectly suited for golf, especially during practice.

One of the complaints about technology on the golf course is that it can get in the way or take you out of the moment, especially when you’re grinding on the range. But Glass is a powerful, hands-free display that eliminates the need to fumble around for your smartphone because it presents the information, such as swing data or even the distance to the pin, directly on the screen in front of your eyes.

Swingbyte weighs less than 1 ounce and connects to the shaft of your club to track thousands of data points during your swing and present accurate information such as your clubhead speed, face angle and even 3D animation of your swing. While the golf swing is complex and golfers can easily get data overload, Swingbyte has always tried to be as easy to use and understand as possible, presenting only the information a golfer needs and wants. Creating Glassware was the next logical step in continuing to fulfill that vision.

“We’re continuing to work to bring the ultimate training experience to golfers,” said Alex Pedenko, Swingbyte co-founder and CEO. “We want to not only provide them with useful and accurate data they can use to improve their game, but we want to deliver it in a fun and convenient manner. Teaming up with Google Glass to offer our Glassware is one example of doing just that. Glassware brings a fun and engaging experience to golfers training on the driving range.”

All a golfer has to do is fire up Swingbyte, download the Swingbyte Glassware from the Google Glass App Store and start swinging. Each swing is tracked, analyzed and sent to the Swingbyte cloud to be available for viewing on any device as well as instantly on Glass. Key swing data, including clubhead speed, club path and face to path are presented in a clean, uncluttered view right on Glass. This allows golfers to stay focused on their routine, focused on what they are working on, and not take the time to reach for a smartphone or tablet to view data after every swing.

Swingbyte_Glass_Golf
Swingbyte’s new app for Google Glass gives golfers hands-free viewing of data points such as club path, face-to-path and swing speed. 

There is so much technical innovation in golf right now and the real opportunity lies in making sure the technology doesn’t take over and command too much attention to use it. With Glass, Swingbyte has created a powerful blend of golf and technology and opened up a new way for golfers to visualize their swing data that doesn’t require adding any additional steps to a golfer’s routine once they start taking swings.

Just like the iOS and Android apps, the Swingbyte Glassware is free and available through the Google Glass App Store. You will need to purchase the hardware which is available for $169 at www.Swingbyte.com and more than 1,800 AT&T stores and select Golf Galaxy, GolfSmith and Golf Town stores. And oh yeah… you’ll need a Google Glass unit, which is currently only available in limited release for $1500. You can sign up on the Glass website to stay informed of future releases.

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When he is not obsessing about his golf game, Kane heads up an innovation lab responsible for driving innovative digital product development for Fortune 500 companies. He is also the co-founder of RoundShout and creator of Ranger GPS, the free iOS GPS app for the driving range. On a quest to become a scratch golfer, Kane writes about his progress (for better or worse) at kanecochran.com and contributes golf technology-focused articles on GolfWRX.com.

1 Comment

1 Comment

  1. LorenRobertsFan

    Apr 23, 2014 at 11:15 am

    Extremely small market of people with Google Glass

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Equipment

What did your handicap do after changing irons? – GolfWRXers discuss

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In our forums, our members have been discussing the impact new irons had on their game and handicap. WRXer ‘2Down’ kicks off the thread with his recent experience, saying

“I changed Irons a bit ago, and while I haven’t seen a huge change, I believe things have stayed the same, and that’s a good thing. 

First and foremost I have maintained a fairly low handicap as I age. I think that, in a similar fashion, while I’m not longer with driver X from nowadays compared to the ago days. Driver I am near as long as I once was. Modern drivers have helped me stay long, so far. Now I believe the same is true with my irons, modern distance drivers and irons have helped me.”

And our members have been sharing their different experiences in our forum.

Here are a few posts from the thread, but make sure to check out the entire discussion and have your say at the link below.

  • Jamie_Tee: “Gained 2 strokes per round. More shaft than head, but I’ve got a combo that allows me to hit the shots I see.”
  • Spankapotomusredux: “Cobra F9 OL. Dropped my handicap from 24 to 19 since March of this year. Regularly hitting the mid 80s this year for the first time in 20 years. Not fair to put it solely on iron play, however. I updated my whole bag when I started playing regularly again for the first time in a few years.”
  • North Butte: “My handicap is three strokes lower than it was four months ago, that was when I most recently changed irons. There’s been more going on than just that equipment change, though. I’ve adopted a slightly different way of playing short game shots in that same time frame. Taking a couple golf lessons for the first time since before COVID has to have helped, as well. But I’d say, conservatively, there surely has to be at least a stroke or so of that improvement due to the clubs. Not enough to get excited about but it ain’t nothing!”
  • Jifmoli: “No change. Went from SGI clubs to GI clubs but hc stayed the same. I did drop 9 strokes last year but that’s because I found a golden tip for chipping.”
  • lefthack: “Nothing, but my level of enjoyment has improved 3 points.”

Entire Thread: “What did your handicap do after changing irons?”

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Coolest thing for sale in the GolfWRX Classifieds (07/28/21): Srixon ZX7 irons

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At GolfWRX, we love golf, plain and simple.

We are a community of like-minded individuals that all experience and express our enjoyment of the game in many ways. It’s that sense of community that drives day-to-day interactions in the forums on topics that range from best driver to what marker you use to mark your ball. It even allows us to share another thing we all love – buy and selling equipment.

Currently, in our GolfWRX buy/sell/trade (BST) forum, there is a listing for a set of Srixon ZX7 irons.

From the seller (@Champ2430): “Srixon ZX7 set 4-PW. KBS TGI 100 shafts hard stepped one time. +.25 with GP TV Midsize plus 4 grips. Used for about 5-6 rounds with an equal amount of range sessions. Lower clubs show a little more wear then other. Overall great shape with very little bag chatter or wear. These were over $1300 on Srixon but I notice they don’t even let you order graphite anymore. Price – $775.”

To check out the full listing in our BST forum, head through the link: Srixon ZX7 irons

This is the most impressive current listing from the GolfWRX BST, and if you are curious about the rules to participate in the BST Forum you can check them out here: GolfWRX BST Rules

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How many adjustable clubs in your bag? – GolfWRXers discuss

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In our forums, our members have been discussing adjustable clubs. WRXer ‘tannyhoban’ has one adjustable club in the bag (driver) and is curious to see how popular the feature is amongst fellow members who have been sharing their setups in our forum.

Here are a few posts from the thread, but make sure to check out the entire discussion and have your say at the link below.

  • Tiptx1122: “I have my epic Max driver and my Epic Max 3W and 5W as those have moveable weights. Oh, I forgot my Piertti Potenza Elite putter has changeable weights too.”
  • lefthack: “3, but I haven’t adjusted anything other than the lie angle. Driver, 5 wood, and utility 3 iron.”
  • ChipNRun: “I was shocked to find only two: my driver and my hybrid. The season prior to COVID, the driver, 3W, 7W, and two hybrids were all adjustable. Driver and hybrid are now both different models.”
  • CpatainPat: “Zero.”

Entire Thread: “How many adjustable clubs in your bag?”

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