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Edison Forged wedges offer performance for everyone

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Terry Koehler is a wedge guy—and today, he officially announces the launch of Edison Forged wedges, the first product from the new Edison Golf Company.

Born from the concept that most wedges on the market don’t benefit the average golfer, Koehler has been on a mission to bring significant technology and innovation to wedges since his initial introduction to the wedge space in the mid-90s. The new Edison forged wedges combine years of experience and design into a club that can offer a tangible improvement in distance control and consistency for every player compared to a traditionally designed tour-style wedge, according to the company.

A shift in design philosophy

Edison Forged wedges look different because they are different. Compared to traditional tour-style wedges that place the majority of mass low in the clubhead, Edison wedges move more mass higher in the head and around the perimeter to increase MOI and consistency on shots hit around the face. Traditional wedges with low center of gravity (CG), cause shots to launch higher and with less spin—that might work for modern drivers, but it’s not something you want in your short game.

Amateur golfers’ largest struggle is consistent face contact. Professional golfers at the highest skill level, on the other hand, can benefit from traditional wedge designs by controlling exactly where the ball makes contact on the face to hit desired trajectories and vary spin. This variability in spin is something that amateur golfers don’t need in their games.

Terry Koehler:

“Tour professionals spend thousands of hours honing their exquisite skills. They have perfected those skills with wedges that really haven’t changed much in decades. I think there are complex reasons why wedges haven’t experienced the same technical revolutions we’ve seen in every other category”

The other difference is the signature TK Sole. The sole has been refined over the years to be as versatile as possible and eliminate the consumer confusion around trying to select just the right grinds for swing and turf conditions. Koehler’s design philosophy is that since turf conditions can vary greatly throughout the season, course to course, and shot to shot, a sole design needs to be able to handle anything you can throw at it. The rear portion of the sole has been given a huge amount of relief to make it lower bounce so it can handle tight lies, firm turf, and shallow swing paths. However, the leading portion of the sole has a high bounce, so that same wedge can handle softer lies and steeper swings.

“Very simply, it takes all that confusion and worry about bounce and throws it right out the window.” – Terry Koehler

Lasting consistency is the final part to this wedge spin equation. Edison Forged are pushing the limits of wedge face and groove design by fly-cutting the face to perfect flatness, then CNC-milling progressive grooves with varying width, depth, spacing, and wall angle. The company then adds a unique “X pattern” etching between the grooves to “push the wedge to USGA limits.”

The proof

Edison Golf doesn’t just want you to take your word for what they are promising with performance. They are offering up the Forged wedges have been proven by independent robotic testing to give you more penetrating trajectories (2-4 degrees lower than ‘tour design’ wedges), dramatically improved spin because of improved gear effect and more distance out of your mishits, particularly those high-face impacts that cost us strokes. The data can be seen below.

Edison Forged wedges: Specs and availability

Edison Forged wedges will come stock in lofts from 45 to 63 degrees in odd numbers only, starting in the spring of 2020, and currently only in right-handed.

Stock shaft offerings are from KBS including the KBS Tour, Tour 105, and Tour Graphite.

Special Offer

Edison is offering specially marked “One of 500” pre-production sets for pre-purchase through the Company’s website at www.EdisonWedges.com. Golfers that purchase one of these limited edition sets will be enrolled in the “Edison 500 Club”, and will receive a suite of special treatment, beginning with a package of Edison logo’d gifts, and includes special Ambassador status where these select Edison wedge owners can earn rewards and incentives for referring their friends to Edison Golf.

 

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Ryan Barath is a writer & the Digital Content Creation Lead for GolfWRX. He also hosts the "On Spec" Podcast on GolfWRX Radio discussing everything golf, including gear, technology, fitting, and course architecture. He is a club fitter & master club builder who has more than 16 years experience working with golfers of all skill levels, including PGA Tour professionals. He studied business and marketing at the Mohawk College in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, and is the former Build Shop Manager & Social Media Coordinator for Modern Golf. He now works independently from his home shop and is a member of advisory panels to a select number of golf equipment manufacturers, including True Temper. You can find Ryan on Twitter and Instagram where he's always willing to chat golf, from course architecture to physics, and share his passion for club building, and wedge grinding.

17 Comments

17 Comments

  1. myron miller

    Dec 6, 2019 at 9:18 pm

    Will they be as hard to hit as the SCOR sand wedges are? 52 and 60 are easy to hit in most situations but the 56 is really tough to hit consistantly in heavy sand. Even Scor’s regional rep had lots of trouble with the 56. I could hit it in the rough but never consistently in the sand.

  2. Jed Barish

    Dec 6, 2019 at 4:13 pm

    I ordered it because I am a believer in his wedges. I love his design with SCOR Golf and been waiting for Terry to come up with a new one 🙂 Hope I’ll be ok with KBS Tour S shaft. Congrats on the comeback!

  3. Kevin

    Dec 5, 2019 at 10:58 pm

    Excited for these. Thanks Terry

  4. chip75

    Dec 5, 2019 at 6:10 pm

    Mentions that current wedges are designed for exceptionally skilled tour players, then backs up their wedge is best with robot testing. Is that irony? I think that’s irony.

    Maybe show the data capture from average players?

    They do look nice.

    • Terry B Koehler

      Dec 5, 2019 at 6:30 pm

      Hello Chip, I can see where you might see irony in the robotic testing, but let me explain the process. With the robot, we can precisely replicate contact at five different points on the face, so that we can quantify the variance in smash factor and all other performance aspects. What we set out to do, and achieved, is the most consistent smash factor around the face, so that you get more consistent results from your slight mishits. I hope that clears up the irony?

      Thank you.
      Terry Koehler

      • chip75

        Dec 5, 2019 at 9:24 pm

        Hi Terry. It was something I found amusing, that current wedges were designed for near perfect ball-strikers to your wedges getting tested by a perfect one.

        The problem with robot testing is that the results are rarely repeatable (or relatable) to human testing. If we continually hit high toe pitches short due to the the drop-off in efficiency, we’ll eventually start adding speed, we’re constantly making adjustments, robots don’t, they just repeat results. I understand the allure of robot testing (it’s something I find fascinating (the testing itself), as human testing is by its very nature extremely variable.

        Anyway, I look forward to seeing reviews, the wedges look great, and I appreciate the post.

  5. Bifule

    Dec 5, 2019 at 4:08 pm

    If I don’t see these on the USGA conforming club list currently does that mean they have not gone through the approval process to be legal for tournament use?

    • Terry Koehler

      Dec 5, 2019 at 6:32 pm

      We will be submitting production articles to the USGA to be measured for the conforming list as we get into regular production. We assure you they will be made to conform to all USGA specifications and be conforming.

  6. C

    Dec 5, 2019 at 3:38 pm

    Will there be discrete bounce angles between lofts? Or are the clubs bent to a loft within each loft group, thereby changing the bounce angles?

  7. Allen

    Dec 5, 2019 at 2:55 pm

    Not for everyone…there are no lefty models yet! Maybe next year.

  8. DB

    Dec 5, 2019 at 1:57 pm

    They look really nice actually. I’m a little confused because the picture shows 58 but the article says odd numbers only. Then the website is selling only the special edition set that is 51-55-59.

  9. Dennis Corley

    Dec 5, 2019 at 1:51 pm

    No pricing provided. I went to the website and understand why. Are you kidding?
    —————–
    “One of 500” – Special Edition of EDISON FORGED Wedges
    Regular price
    $537.00
    Shipping calculated at checkout.
    —————-
    I suppose there is no end to the madness.

    • Cody

      Dec 5, 2019 at 2:43 pm

      Looks like it’s for a set of 3 wedges. Pricey, but so are Vokeys.

      • cody

        Dec 5, 2019 at 5:56 pm

        I guess he didnt learn his lesson with Hogan…

        Oh well these will be gone soon too.

    • Barrett

      Dec 6, 2019 at 1:52 pm

      In all fairness, that price is only to get in to their “500 Club”. I’m sure the wedges will cost less than $180 when they are available to the general public.

  10. C

    Dec 5, 2019 at 1:37 pm

    “Edison Forged wedges will come stock in lofts from 45 to 63 degrees in odd numbers only”

    …shows picture of 58.

    • Ben Alberstadt

      Dec 5, 2019 at 3:22 pm

      The photos are of wedges that were built to even-numbered specs for testing purposes. Same wedges as will be at retail, save for the 1-degree loft differences.

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Whats in the Bag

Andrew Landry’s winning WITB: The American Express 2020

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Driver: Ping G410 LST (10.5 degrees, neutral setting)
Shaft: Aldila Tour Blue 65 TX (tipped 1″, 45.25″)

3-wood: TaylorMade M5 (15 degrees)
Shaft: Project X HZRDUS Yellow

5-wood: Ping G (set at 17.75)
Shaft: Project X HZRDUS Yellow 85-6.5 (42″)

7-wood: Ping G410 (set at 20.5 degrees)
Shaft: Project X HZRDUS Yellow 83-6.5 (41″, tipped 2″)

Irons: Ping iBlade (4-PW)
Shafts: Nippon Modus3 105-X

Wedges: Ping Glide 3.0 (46 bent to 45), Titleist Vokey Design SM8 (54, 60 degrees)
Shafts: Nippon Modus3 Tour 105-X

Putter: Ping Vault 2.0 ZB Stealth (33″, 22° lie, 3° loft)
Grip: PP58 Full Cord Standard

Grips: Lamkin Crossline Full Cord 58R

Ball: Titleist Pro V1x

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Whats in the Bag

Lee Westwood’s winning WITB: 2020 Abu Dhabi HSBC Golf Championship

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Driver: Ping G410 Plus (10.5 degrees at 10 degrees, neutral)
Shaft: Aldila NV 2KXV Green 65 X (tipped 1/2 inch)

3-wood: Ping G410 (14.5 degrees)
Shaft: Aldila NV 2KXV Green

Hybrid: Ping G410 (19 degrees at 19.7)
Shaft: Aldila Tour Green Hybrid 85 X (40.5 inches)

Driving iron: Ping G Crossover (2)
Shaft: Ping JZ Stiff

Irons: Ping i210 (4-UW)
Shaft: Ping JZ Stiff w/Cushin stepped 1 strong

Wedges: Ping Glide Forged (60 degrees)
Shaft: Ping JZ Stiff w/Cushin, stepped 1 strong

Putter: Ping Sigma 2 Fetch

Grips: Lamkin Crossline Full Cord 58 Rib (+2 wraps) on woods, Ping ID8 White 1/2 Cord (+2 wraps) on irons

Ball: Titleist Pro V1x

 

Additional specs on Ping.com

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Equipment

From a Fitter: Everything you need to know about wedge shafts

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This is such a dark corner of the golf industry that I truly believe needs a lot of work. Hopefully, this article can shed some light on wedge shafts for you.

I will mention some standards, explain some of my experience, and hopefully, help you make some good choices.

Linking back to the first article on aspects of a wedge that I target when fitting, I place a lot of weight on the style, bounce, grind, and loft/lie/length to get my wedge fitting started. As we move into shaft options, I look at crossing T’s and dotting I’s to ensure a player enjoys their new wedge setup.

We carry a bunch of shaft options built into different heads. As yet we do not have a consistent way to swap shafts in wedges during a session that still allows them to play at a reasonable swing weight and perform as we would like. Moving forward, I will be looking to explore this area to see if we can deliver better service and experience.

Generic standards for wedge shaft setup

  • Dynamic Gold “wedge flex”
  • Matching exactly the same shaft in your irons to your wedges
  • A slightly heavier shaft in your wedges
  • Putting an 8-iron shaft in your wedges
  • Using a wedge-specific shaft

During an iron fitting, we see a lot of variables in flight and feel, this is mainly because we use 6-irons as our demo clubs. When clients are hitting 6-iron shots, they are often looking for max carry, flight, and shot-shaping ability. This leads to hitting a lot of full swings and placing the shaft under a decent amount of load, therefore, we see some notable changes when we swap shafts. This will not show up as drastically in wedges as we are not always trying to hit the full shot. 

As we get into wedge fitting, I discuss with my clients in-depth what they use each wedge for, how far they hit them, what is the most common shot they play, what are the most common bad shots, how does the ball react on the green and what shots do they feel they need in the bag. Basically, trying to get a good overview of their game in a short period. In very few cases do players mention the ‘full shot’ lets them down? Often players say they are more comfortable hitting “softer shots” or 3/4 swings, this gives them the flight/shot that they require on a regular basis and the niche shots and consistency lets them down.

Logic here says to me, you probably do not want exactly the same shaft in the irons all the way down to the lob wedge when you are hitting soft shots 95 percent of the time. When I look at shaft specs, I am trying to build a shaft that can easily put up with the stress of a full shot and handle a softer shot without feeling blunt (for all clubs in the bag).

When I merge this process into wedges, the only wedge a “matching iron” shaft seems to be applicable (for the majority) is the gap wedge or the wedge that is predominantly a full-swing club. This is the club you hit full and maybe knock-down shots with, but you’re rarely trying to hit “flicky” spinning shots. (Those shots are why you also have a sand and/or lob wedge in the bag).

It would then make sense that if you are rarely hitting any full shots with your sand wedge or lob wedge, you probably want a softer golf shaft in those (as they are not trying to put up with your “flat out” swing), still ensuring the shaft does not feel ‘blunt’ or hard work to play around the greens with.

This is not a one size fits all theory, but I think a lot of players would have success even thinking about their wedge shaft layout in this way.

As an example: Personally, I am playing True Temper Dynamic Gold Tour Issue 120g X100 flex iron shafts. I hit a lot of full shots with my 50 and 54, so I have chosen to play the DG 120TI X100 shaft exactly the same way in those two clubs. My 60-degree however, I rarely hit the full shot, so I feel need it a little softer in stiffness, but I need the weight to get my tempo correct and to give me more control to hit lower shots. For this club, I play the Dynamic Gold S400 Tour Issue. I chose this shaft as the profile is very close to my iron shaft but it is 13g heavier and has a slightly softer tip section, which I feel gives me a little better response.

Please see the S3 shaft profile comparison below

(I am very lucky to have the S3 shaft data, it gives me an apples-to-apples comparison of shaft profiles and weights and make wedge shaft selection a lot easier).

I also wanted to capture some data to highlight the difference wedge shafts have as simply as possible. Below is a graph showing a PGA pro’s shot grouping with a few shaft options. His 6-iron speed is about 94mph, and he has a sharp back-swing to down-swing ratio. This would put him at the quick end of people I fit. This generally means the player enjoys stiffer shafts, stiff style profiles, high swingweight, high total/shaft weight (and again not in all cases).

He tested three shafts all in the same wedge head, with the same length, loft, and lie.

Please see the grouping below

The three shafts tested were: Nippon Modus 105 Wedge specific, Dynamic Gold Wedge flex and Dynamic Gold Tour Issue S400.

In no way am I trying to demonstrate the DG S400 is the best shaft for wedges, but in this group of data all that shows up is, the stiffest profile, heaviest shaft (of the test group) gave the player the tightest grouping for his 55-degree wedge shot. His explanation was that he felt the club’s position in the swing better and the strike through the turf was much more consistent, producing more consistent land zones with the DG S400. This small test shows that the wedge shaft alone has an impact even for a skilled golfer.

There are however always exceptions to theories (especially in golf!)

When I have a player using, for example, C-Taper 130 X or Dynamic Gold X100 in their irons it is tough to find a profile that matches closely that is heavier and not any stiffer. In these cases, I tend to have them play the same shaft all the way down to their LW, but I try to increase swing weight and decrease FM in the niche shot wedges (SW and LW). This can just mean adding head weight to soften the shaft a little, or sometimes soft-stepping the product to get some ‘feel’ back. 

The key take-away points

  • Think about the shots you play with your wedges most and how hard you hit them
  • Think about linking your shafts to your irons, but they do not always have to match
  • Test options and measure: grouping, turf interaction and flight consistency
  • Try and break down if the ‘”feel” of stiffness or weight help or hinder you making a consistent swing/strike
  • Don’t just settle with the shaft the wedges come with… unless they match in with your setup!

Getting all the information in one article is always tough, and I hate generalizing, so feel free to shoot me some questions—I like to try to help and also hear your experience and ideas when I can!

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