Connect with us

Equipment

New for 2020, Callaway Jaws MD5 wedges boast more bite

Published

on

Say hello to the new 2020 Callaway Jaws MD5 wedges from Callaway Golf. Redesigned from the ground up to create ultimate performance on all shots, the new Jaws wedges are being marketed as the most aggressive grooves in golf.

It’s been almost 10 years since we’ve seen the Jaws name used as part of the Callaway wedge lineup, but with the introduction of the new MD5 (Mack Daddy 5) Jaws wedges and their completely rethought-out groove design, Callaway felt that if there was a time to bring it back, it’s now!

2020 Callaway Jaws MD5 wedge 1

Callaway Jaws MD5 wedges: The story

The Rules of Golf have limits set on everything, but when you have a lot of smart people trying to solve problems, those limits just mean you have to get creative with design. That’s exactly what the engineers have done with the new Callaway wedge and its Jaws grooves. By changing the overall shape compared to all previous models, they have increased not just spin but total control. That’s probably the most overlooked part of the wedge equation: creating greater control and consistency. Sure, more spin is great, but if it fluctuates from shot to shot, you are in no way better off.

The new proprietary groove design of the Jaws wedge is a change to the whole shape, including a different way to get the contact radius right to the limit, and when we say right to the limit, we mean it. In fact, when initially prototyped and brought to Callaway’s manufacturing partners for scaled-up manufacturing, the initial response from the factory after test runs was “sorry, we just can’t do this.” The reason? Fail rate was close to 50 percent becoming nonconforming which is a big no-go in the world of manufacturing. Such a situation would drive cost (because of losses) through the proverbial roof, especially when you consider each wedge’s face takes 10 minutes of machine time—not including the microgrooves.

The solution for Callaway? Changing the cutting tool every 15 wedges. Sure, you could attempt to get more life out of each tool, but when you have everyone from recreational players to the world’s best putting them in play, you can’t make sacrifices.

Callaway 2020 MD5 JAWS Wedge Grooves

Callaway 2020 MD5 Jaws wedge: groove detail

The end result is the MD5 Jaws spins over 10 percent more on shots hit around the green compared to the Callaway MD4 and launches lower by one degree (for those wondering if one degree matters: yes it does). Lower launch might not seem like something you want with a wedge, but if you talk to any short game coach with a launch monitor, or Roger Cleveland in Callaway’s case, you will quickly realize that being able to control launch with a wedge is just as important and is it with a driver. A lower-launching wedge means the coefficient of friction is higher since the ball isn’t riding/sliding up the face—and boom, you have a greater ability to hit the better-player-preferred “low checker.”

Now beyond the grooves, Callaway and the wedge team re-evaluated the whole shape and profile of the MD5 Jaws, along with the grind options. As the trend of more players swapping their stock pitching wedges for wedges that match the lower end of the bag (up to 45-46 degrees). Callaway designers decided to reshape the lower lofted wedges from the 46-56 degrees to have a smaller profile and flow better from the lowest to highest loft in the wedge set. Don’t think this is just for looks either—smaller heads allow for more concentrated mass and with a smaller shape comes better workability. There is no sense in trying to replace your stock set pitching wedge with a less versatile option.

Callaway Jaws MD5 wedge face

The other reason for this change in the MD5 Jaws wedges is that data and player testing shows the 46- 56-degree clubs are used a lot more often for full shots compared to the higher lofted wedges, which are more likely than not to be hit with a more open face. This creates the ability to flight and control the ball better with the “full swing” clubs, yet still gives more face surface area to hit when the higher lofted “around the green” clubs and opened up. It’s a “best of both worlds” design philosophy. Instead of committing to a single size and shape for the whole line—which from a manufacturing perspective is less expensive—Callaway pulled out all the stops in making the Jaws wedges better, not just newer.

New Callaway wedge face

With all the talk of reshaping, the last part of this puzzle are the sole grinds. From the C Grind to the W (wide) sole wedges, everything has been tweaked. One of the best examples of this tweaking is the new lower bounce W (Wide) sole wedge. Mr. Roger Cleveland himself was doing a lot of customizing for tour players to tweak the stock MD4 W Grinds to reduce bounce and width of the soles, and after seeing this trend, the most popular tweak has now become a stock option on the MD5 Jaws.

There is even additional heel relief to help those players that want to open the face up for shots around the green. The opposite could be said about the new C Grind; with more effective bounce thanks to a wider center of the sole—but more playability with aggressive heel and toe relief. What seem like small changes are really a commitment to continued improvement by the wedge team at Callaway Golf, and I think with the MD5 Jaws wedges they have a winner destined to take a BITE out of the wedge market (Give me credit for taking this long to make a shark pun).

Customs

With the new MD5 Jaws, Callaway is upping its Customs game with 10 different “zones” to choose from, including the paint fill on the sole, the hosel, new medallion options (including emojis), and the back of the club. More ways to customize your wedge than ever before!

Callaway Jaws MD5 wedges: Availability and options

Shafts

Steel: True Temper Tour Issue 115 with a blue and silver shaft band


Graphite: Project X Catalyst 80g

Grip: Lamkin UTX Blue

Price: $159.99

 

 

 

Your Reaction?
  • 143
  • LEGIT19
  • WOW6
  • LOL9
  • IDHT1
  • FLOP8
  • OB9
  • SHANK23

Ryan Barath is a writer & the Digital Content Creation Lead for GolfWRX. He also hosts the "On Spec" Podcast on GolfWRX Radio discussing everything golf, including gear, technology, fitting, and course architecture. He is a club fitter & master club builder who has more than 16 years experience working with golfers of all skill levels, including PGA Tour professionals. He studied business and marketing at the Mohawk College in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, and is the former Build Shop Manager & Social Media Coordinator for Modern Golf. He now works independently from his home shop in Hamilton and is a member of advisory panels to a select number of golf equipment manufacturers, including True Temper. You can find Ryan on Twitter and Instagram where he's always willing to chat golf, from course architecture to physics, and share his passion for club building, and wedge grinding.

10 Comments

10 Comments

  1. Sean

    Oct 9, 2019 at 6:14 am

    Great wedges. Well worth the investment.

  2. chadj

    Sep 10, 2019 at 8:13 pm

    No LH 46 degree or 64 degree, but 5 different LH options for a 60 degree. Seems fair callaway….idiots

  3. Milo

    Sep 10, 2019 at 7:07 pm

    Why are wedges so damn expensive?

    • gwelfgulfer

      Sep 11, 2019 at 9:00 am

      Because people continue to pay the prices. Lemmings will always lemming.

  4. DB

    Sep 10, 2019 at 3:10 pm

    They look good, forged or cast?

  5. Greg

    Sep 10, 2019 at 12:31 pm

    The steel shaft offering sucks.

  6. Travisty

    Sep 10, 2019 at 9:26 am

    These are actually a nice step forward from MD4 (and MD3 before that). Callaway is doing great things in their wedge department. The black finish here IMO is much better than before too.

  7. Off-Centre ChromeSoft

    Sep 10, 2019 at 8:05 am

    Find it, cut it.

  8. Bradley

    Sep 10, 2019 at 7:46 am

    I wonder if Callaway clubs are off like there golf balls?

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Whats in the Bag

Lanto Griffin’s winning WITB: 2019 Houston Open

Published

on

Driver: Titleist 917 D2 (10.5 degrees @ 9.75)
Shaft: Mitsubishi Kuro Kage TiNi 70 TX

3-wood: Titleist TS2 (16 degrees)
Shaft: Mitsubishi Tensei CK Blue 80 X

Irons: Titleist U510 (2), Titleist T100 (4-9)
Shafts: Nippon N.S. Pro Modus3 Tour 105 X (2), Nippon N.S. Pro Modus3 Tour 130 X (4-9)

Wedges: Titleist Vokey Design SM7 (46 10F, 50 12F bent to 51, 54 10S bent to 55, 60 08M)
Shafts: Nippon N.S. Pro Modus3 Tour 120 X

Putter: Sik Flo
Grip: SuperStroke Slim 3.0

Ball: Titleist Pro V1

Grips: Golf Pride tour Velvet

Your Reaction?
  • 23
  • LEGIT1
  • WOW0
  • LOL2
  • IDHT0
  • FLOP2
  • OB1
  • SHANK4

Continue Reading

Whats in the Bag

Cole Hammer WITB 2019

Published

on

*Equipment accurate as of the 2019 Houston Open

Driver: Ping G400 LST (8.5 degrees)
Shaft: Mitsubishi Kuro Kage XT 70 TX

cole-hammer-witb-2019-driver

3-wood: Ping G410 LST (14.5 degrees)
Shaft: Graphite Design Tour AD-IZ 7X

cole-hammer-witb-3-wood

Irons: Ping i210 (3, 4), Ping iBlade (5-PW)
Shafts: True Temper XP 115

cole-hammer-witb-irons

Wedges: Ping Glide 2.0 (50/12, 54/12, 58/10)
Shafts: True Temper Dynamic Gold Tour Issue S400

cole-hammer-witb-wedges

Putter: Ping PLD Anser 2

Grips: Golf Pride Tour Velvet

Ball: Titleist Pro V1x

Your Reaction?
  • 31
  • LEGIT7
  • WOW0
  • LOL1
  • IDHT0
  • FLOP1
  • OB0
  • SHANK4

Continue Reading

Equipment

All-new KBS TD graphite shafts for drivers and woods released

Published

on

kbs-td-shafts

After more than a decade designing steel shafts that have helped revolutionize the golf custom fitting and OEM space, KBS Golf Shafts and designer Kim Braly are going further by officially launching the all new TD Driver and wood shafts.

kbs-td-shafts-2

Until recently KBS’s focus had always been on steel iron and wedge shafts, including the popular KBS Tour, KBS Tour 90, C-Taper, and TourV products. But over the last few years, its line has slowly expanded to graphite hybrid and irons shafts in varying weights and profiles to help create a matrix of shafts that would allow fitters to find a KBS Shaft for almost any situation. The one void in the matrix was driver and wood shafts—but not anymore!

The all new KBS TD (Tour Driver) wood shafts are a huge step forward for a company that has always focused on helping golfers get the most performance out of their clubs. The KBS TD’s range in weight options from 40g to 80g+ in 10g increments with evolving profiles as the weights increases. This ideology is based on the simple fact that from years of working with the best fitters in the world, KBS has developed a deep understanding of how these factors work together to help each player in certain swing “categories.”

The other interesting part of the KBS TD wood line is the absence of stated flex on each shaft—yes, they 100 percent come in varying flexes but not in the same “stiff” and “regular” naming that most golfers are familiar with. Instead, the TD shafts are separated into categories ranging from Category 1 through Category 4. This helps eliminate some of the preconceived notions that some golfers might have about trying different shaft flexes, and on the custom fitting side, also helps fitters better understand each player swing profile that matches up with a certain weight and flex (category).

KBS TD shafts: Specs & fitting details

Getting into the nitty-gritty of the specs from a fitting perspective, every shaft in the KBS TD line has the potential to work in any driver or fairway wood. This gives golfers the opportunity to play a KBS product right through the entire top end of the bag from driver to highest-lofted fairway wood.

The fitting opportunities are also expanded since every shaft in the TD line has 4 inches of parallel tip section to allow fitters and builders fine-tune to create in-between flexes. This is nothing new in the shaft world, but considering this design trait is available in every shaft, it means that, for example, if you need a “Category 3.5” a builder could tip a 3 a little extra to make it play the perfect flex.

For more information on the KBS TD wood shafts and the rest of the KBS shaft lines, check out KBSGOLFSHAFTS.com 

Also, check out GolfWRX Forums: KBS TD Shafts Spotted to join the discussion on these newest shafts from KBS.

Your Reaction?
  • 101
  • LEGIT8
  • WOW6
  • LOL6
  • IDHT2
  • FLOP2
  • OB2
  • SHANK3

Continue Reading

19th Hole

Facebook

Trending