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New for 2020, Callaway Jaws MD5 wedges boast more bite

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Say hello to the new 2020 Callaway Jaws MD5 wedges from Callaway Golf. Redesigned from the ground up to create ultimate performance on all shots, the new Jaws wedges are being marketed as the most aggressive grooves in golf.

It’s been almost 10 years since we’ve seen the Jaws name used as part of the Callaway wedge lineup, but with the introduction of the new MD5 (Mack Daddy 5) Jaws wedges and their completely rethought-out groove design, Callaway felt that if there was a time to bring it back, it’s now!

2020 Callaway Jaws MD5 wedge 1

Callaway Jaws MD5 wedges: The story

The Rules of Golf have limits set on everything, but when you have a lot of smart people trying to solve problems, those limits just mean you have to get creative with design. That’s exactly what the engineers have done with the new Callaway wedge and its Jaws grooves. By changing the overall shape compared to all previous models, they have increased not just spin but total control. That’s probably the most overlooked part of the wedge equation: creating greater control and consistency. Sure, more spin is great, but if it fluctuates from shot to shot, you are in no way better off.

The new proprietary groove design of the Jaws wedge is a change to the whole shape, including a different way to get the contact radius right to the limit, and when we say right to the limit, we mean it. In fact, when initially prototyped and brought to Callaway’s manufacturing partners for scaled-up manufacturing, the initial response from the factory after test runs was “sorry, we just can’t do this.” The reason? Fail rate was close to 50 percent becoming nonconforming which is a big no-go in the world of manufacturing. Such a situation would drive cost (because of losses) through the proverbial roof, especially when you consider each wedge’s face takes 10 minutes of machine time—not including the microgrooves.

The solution for Callaway? Changing the cutting tool every 15 wedges. Sure, you could attempt to get more life out of each tool, but when you have everyone from recreational players to the world’s best putting them in play, you can’t make sacrifices.

Callaway 2020 MD5 JAWS Wedge Grooves

Callaway 2020 MD5 Jaws wedge: groove detail

The end result is the MD5 Jaws spins over 10 percent more on shots hit around the green compared to the Callaway MD4 and launches lower by one degree (for those wondering if one degree matters: yes it does). Lower launch might not seem like something you want with a wedge, but if you talk to any short game coach with a launch monitor, or Roger Cleveland in Callaway’s case, you will quickly realize that being able to control launch with a wedge is just as important and is it with a driver. A lower-launching wedge means the coefficient of friction is higher since the ball isn’t riding/sliding up the face—and boom, you have a greater ability to hit the better-player-preferred “low checker.”

Now beyond the grooves, Callaway and the wedge team re-evaluated the whole shape and profile of the MD5 Jaws, along with the grind options. As the trend of more players swapping their stock pitching wedges for wedges that match the lower end of the bag (up to 45-46 degrees). Callaway designers decided to reshape the lower lofted wedges from the 46-56 degrees to have a smaller profile and flow better from the lowest to highest loft in the wedge set. Don’t think this is just for looks either—smaller heads allow for more concentrated mass and with a smaller shape comes better workability. There is no sense in trying to replace your stock set pitching wedge with a less versatile option.

Callaway Jaws MD5 wedge face

The other reason for this change in the MD5 Jaws wedges is that data and player testing shows the 46- 56-degree clubs are used a lot more often for full shots compared to the higher lofted wedges, which are more likely than not to be hit with a more open face. This creates the ability to flight and control the ball better with the “full swing” clubs, yet still gives more face surface area to hit when the higher lofted “around the green” clubs and opened up. It’s a “best of both worlds” design philosophy. Instead of committing to a single size and shape for the whole line—which from a manufacturing perspective is less expensive—Callaway pulled out all the stops in making the Jaws wedges better, not just newer.

New Callaway wedge face

With all the talk of reshaping, the last part of this puzzle are the sole grinds. From the C Grind to the W (wide) sole wedges, everything has been tweaked. One of the best examples of this tweaking is the new lower bounce W (Wide) sole wedge. Mr. Roger Cleveland himself was doing a lot of customizing for tour players to tweak the stock MD4 W Grinds to reduce bounce and width of the soles, and after seeing this trend, the most popular tweak has now become a stock option on the MD5 Jaws.

There is even additional heel relief to help those players that want to open the face up for shots around the green. The opposite could be said about the new C Grind; with more effective bounce thanks to a wider center of the sole—but more playability with aggressive heel and toe relief. What seem like small changes are really a commitment to continued improvement by the wedge team at Callaway Golf, and I think with the MD5 Jaws wedges they have a winner destined to take a BITE out of the wedge market (Give me credit for taking this long to make a shark pun).

Customs

With the new MD5 Jaws, Callaway is upping its Customs game with 10 different “zones” to choose from, including the paint fill on the sole, the hosel, new medallion options (including emojis), and the back of the club. More ways to customize your wedge than ever before!

Callaway Jaws MD5 wedges: Availability and options

Shafts

Steel: True Temper Tour Issue 115 with a blue and silver shaft band


Graphite: Project X Catalyst 80g

Grip: Lamkin UTX Blue

Price: $159.99

 

 

 

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Ryan Barath is a club-fitter & master club builder with more than 17 years of experience working with golfers of all skill levels, including PGA Tour players. He is the former Build Shop Manager & Social Media Coordinator for Modern Golf. He now works independently from his home shop and is a member of advisory panels to a select number of golf equipment manufacturers. You can find Ryan on Twitter and Instagram where he's always willing to chat golf, and share his passion for club building, course architecture and wedge grinding.

12 Comments

12 Comments

  1. Pingback: GolfWRX Spotted: Prototype Callaway Jaws wedge – GolfWRX

  2. Pingback: Best wedges of 2021: Traditional – GolfWRX

  3. Sean

    Oct 9, 2019 at 6:14 am

    Great wedges. Well worth the investment.

  4. chadj

    Sep 10, 2019 at 8:13 pm

    No LH 46 degree or 64 degree, but 5 different LH options for a 60 degree. Seems fair callaway….idiots

  5. Milo

    Sep 10, 2019 at 7:07 pm

    Why are wedges so damn expensive?

    • gwelfgulfer

      Sep 11, 2019 at 9:00 am

      Because people continue to pay the prices. Lemmings will always lemming.

  6. DB

    Sep 10, 2019 at 3:10 pm

    They look good, forged or cast?

  7. Greg

    Sep 10, 2019 at 12:31 pm

    The steel shaft offering sucks.

  8. Travisty

    Sep 10, 2019 at 9:26 am

    These are actually a nice step forward from MD4 (and MD3 before that). Callaway is doing great things in their wedge department. The black finish here IMO is much better than before too.

  9. Off-Centre ChromeSoft

    Sep 10, 2019 at 8:05 am

    Find it, cut it.

  10. Bradley

    Sep 10, 2019 at 7:46 am

    I wonder if Callaway clubs are off like there golf balls?

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Equipment

What Adam Scott said about his new 681.AS irons

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Adam Scott has used the same irons — Titleist Forged 680 — for the better part of 10 years.

“When you’re old and stubborn, you like what you like,” the 41-year-old told PGATOUR.COM.

Indeed, as he has transitioned into Titleist’s latest woods and wedges, the 14-time PGA TOUR winner has remained steadfast in playing his 2003 680 irons with KBS Tour 130 X shafts.

It was interesting, then, to see Scott with a different — but very similar — set of irons in the bag ahead of THE CJ CUP @ SUMMIT.

Adam Scott’s trust Titleist 680 8-iron

Scott’s new 681.AS Forged 8-iron

At a glance, the visually stunning irons look identically shaped to the 680s we’re used to seeing in Scott’s bag — similar large muscle pad on the rear of the club, similar hosel transition, similar generous amount of offset, similar topline. However, the irons looked substantially less worn and were stamped with 681.AS on the hosel.

What’s going on here?

Titleist declined to comment, but PGATOUR.COM caught up with Scott, who shared some details. As it turns out the new irons are the same…sort of.

Before digging into the 681.AS, we asked Scott why he doesn’t simply continue playing 680 irons, and when a set wears out, replace them with another. The answer, he said, was simple. Titleist “just ran out of original sets,” which the company stopped producing in 2005.

What to do? Scour eBay and used club stores? Frequent garage sales?

Scott indicated Titleist engineers took a different tack: They made CAD (computer-aided design) copies of his beloved 680s and CNC-machined what he called, “basically the same clubs.”

“Thanks to technology,” he said, “they’re as exact a replica as you can get, but with the way they’ve been made, I could argue it’s a more solid head with a more solid strike.

“I’ve been stuck on the 680s for a long time now,” he added. “…We’ve tried some stuff here and there. We tried bending the 620 MBs earlier this year, which I actually used at the Masters. I’ve been looking for 12 months for that new fresh set with good feel in the hands and good vibes, and we just couldn’t get there, so they took this project on.”

He continued: “It’s very nice for me that Titleist was able to do that. I know what I know. I’ve played it so long, I’m at a point where I think it’s detrimental to go searching and trying to change. I know how I play, and I know what I need to play well.”

Read the full piece here. 

Check out Adam Scott’s full WITB here.

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Coolest thing for sale in the GolfWRX Classifieds (10/15/21): Tour Issue Rare Odyssey Stroke Lab Jailbird Mini

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At GolfWRX, we love golf, plain and simple.

We are a community of like-minded individuals that all experience and express our enjoyment of the game in many ways. It’s that sense of community that drives day-to-day interactions in the forums on topics that range from best driver to what marker you use to mark your ball. It even allows us to share another thing we all love – buy and selling equipment.

Currently, in our GolfWRX buy/sell/trade (BST) forum, there is a listing for a Tour Issue Rare Odyssey Stroke Lab Jailbird Mini

From the seller (@Hunter01): “Rare Tour Issue Odyssey Stroke Lab mini putter. From the tour van with tour crimp on hosel. 35” long with grip options available. This putter never came to retail but we’re made available to the tour in limited quantities. 329 firm.”

To check out the full listing in our BST forum, head through the link: Tour Issue Rare Odyssey Stroke Lab Jailbird Mini 

This is the most impressive current listing from the GolfWRX BST, and if you are curious about the rules to participate in the BST Forum you can check them out here: GolfWRX BST Rules

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L.A.B Golf unveils new MEZZ.1 Proto putter

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L.A.B Golf has soft-launched its new MEZZ.1. Proto, which is currently limited to just 1,000 individually numbered putters.

The new mid-mallet putter is fully CNC machined from a billet of 6061 aircraft aluminum (body) and 303 stainless steel (midsection) for what L.A.B are calling their “best-feeling putter to date”.

The new addition includes 10 weights (eight on the bottom, two on the sides) that allow the company to individually build each putter to a golfer’s exact specifications.

Golfers can also choose their preferred alignment aid, with blank (no marking), line, and dot all offered with the new MEZZ.1 Proto.

The putter comes equipped with a headcover and is available to purchase now at LabGolf.com for $600.00.

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