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Tursky’s Takes: Justin Thomas vs. PGA Tour fans

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GolfWRX Editor Andrew Tursky — with his new “Tursky’s Takes” segment — discusses what Justin Thomas SHOULD have done when the golf fan heckled him, and why PGA Tour fans should never root for a golfer to fail.

Watch the video below to see Tursky’s take.

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9 Comments

9 Comments

  1. Marc

    Feb 28, 2018 at 8:00 pm

    What’s Justin going to do at this year’s Ryder Cup? Ask the fans to be quiet while he hits?
    I don’t think so.

  2. Kelly

    Feb 28, 2018 at 3:44 pm

    What was the big deal. It was said after the shot had been hit. JT needs to grow a set of balls and quit acting like a little kid who just got told no.

  3. Joro

    Feb 28, 2018 at 2:25 pm

    What a bunch of stupid comments, Straighten up Justin and quit acting like a spoiled Brat and encouraging these A-Holes. There fans today are not the reserved fans of yesterday, take your millions and be quiet.

  4. Bbp1

    Feb 28, 2018 at 2:17 pm

    What people get out of the yelling is a mystery. It doesn’t get them any recognition. The Barstool guys have this all wrong. No you shouldn’t want to yell out against another player. It’s fine to root against a player but keep it to yourself. It’s not funny. Not entertaining. Adds nothing to the event. It’s interesting to see how this lack of self control has creeped into the culture.

    Part of it is the new idea “I can do what ever I want because it makes me happy, regardless of whether it screws up the experience for others” and it does come off as a bummer to a lot of people.

    Sort of like the dudes who drive down the street in their Honda Accord that has headers with the window down all the way and the radios jacked up all the way. Dbag.

  5. Boyo

    Feb 28, 2018 at 1:12 pm

    Right on Mikey.
    Throw the bums out.
    Nobody wants to hear it.

  6. Robert

    Feb 28, 2018 at 11:54 am

    Justin needs to talk with Monty, Sergio (re-gripping episodes), Fat Jack. and many more.
    This is not a new problem. Get over it and play golf.

  7. MikeyB

    Feb 27, 2018 at 11:28 pm

    Ok, toss out the dude who wants the ball in the bunker. When he’s gone,find the *ssclowns who yell ‘Bobba Booey!’ or ‘Mashed Pataytahs!’ or the always original ‘It’s in da’ hole!’after every goddamn tee shot.

    Oh and while PGA security gets those idiots into the parking lot, I’ll go make some popcorn to watch the 1,000+ riot cops descending on the 16th at the WM Open and arresting ALL the morons who either throw beer cans into the bunkers OR boo bad tee shots. Now watching drunks get their melons cracked live on the Golf Channel? THAT there is entertainment gold.

    Of course Brandel Chamblee and David Duval will have to offer opposing viewpoints on how the cops are using a long enough backswing, staying on plane, and following through on their baton strikes….

    Look. Boorish behaviour has existed in golf since 5 minutes after the game was invented, ok? “Aye McTavish, you goat f*cker, you swing that stick thing like a wee girl!” It only exists because the mob and the media tolerate it. If the mob turns and collectively points to the offender, or if the media willingly and publicly helps ID the jerks, then those who might act in this fashion will know they will ALWAYS be caught and dealt with, so why chance it?

    I appreciate the point when it comes to not having jerks on the course at PGA events. The reality is the genie has been out of the bottle for some time now. It’s going to take a couple years to get it back in.

    • makaveli

      Feb 28, 2018 at 12:05 am

      The PDW “Who do you think you are, I am” is a classic. By the way its Baba Booey…Hey Nowww

    • Alfredo Smith

      Feb 28, 2018 at 11:46 pm

      Wow MikeyB! You absolutely nailed it!

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The Gear Dive: Discussing the drivers of 2020 with Bryan LaRoche

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In this episode of The Gear Dive, Johnny chats with his good buddy Bryan LaRoche. They chat on life and do a deep dive into the drivers of 2020.

Check out the full podcast on SoundCloud below, or click here to listen on iTunes or here to listen on Spotify.

Want more GolfWRX Radio? Check out our other shows (and the full archives for this show) below. 

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Opinion & Analysis

The Wedge Guy: The 5 indisputable rules of bunker play

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I received a particularly interesting question this week from Art S., who said he has read all the tips about how to hit different sand shots, from different sand conditions, but it would be helpful to know why. Specifically, here’s what Art had to say:

“I recently found myself in a few sand traps in multiple lies and multiple degrees of wetness. I tried remembering all of the “rules” of how to stand, how much to open my club, how much weight to shift forward or back, etc. based on the Golf Channel but was hoping that you might be able to do a blog on the ‘why’ of sand play so that we can understand it rather than memorizing what to do. Is there any way you can discuss what the club is doing and why you open the club, open your stance, what you’re aiming for when you open up, and any other tips?”

Well, Art, you asked a very good question, so let’s try to cover the basics of sand play–the “geometry and physics” at work in the bunkers–and see if we can make all of this more clear for you.

First of all, I think bunkers are among the toughest of places to find your ball. We see the tour players hit these spectacular bunker shots every week, but realize that they are playing courses where the bunkers are maintained to PGA Tour standards, so they are pretty much the same every hole and every week. This helps the players to produce the “product” the tour is trying to deliver–excitement. Of course, those guys also practice bunker play every day.

All of us, on the other hand, play courses where the bunkers are different from one another. This one is a little firmer, that one a little softer. So, let me see if I can shed a little light on the “whys and wherefores” of bunker play.

The sand wedge has a sole with a downward/backward angle built into it – we call that bounce. It’s sole (no pun intended) function is to provide a measure of “rejection” force or lift when the club makes contact with the sand. The more bounce that is built into the sole of the wedge, the more this rejection force is applied. And when we open the face of the wedge, we increase the effective bounce so that this force is increased as well.

The most basic thing you have to assess when you step into a bunker is the firmness of the sand. It stands to reason that the firmer the texture, the more it will reject the digging effect of the wedge. That “rejection quotient” also determines the most desirable swing path for the shot at hand. Firmer sand will reject the club more, so you can hit the shot with a slightly more descending clubhead path. Conversely, softer or fluffier sand will provide less rejection force, so you need to hit the shot with a shallower clubhead path so that you don’t dig a trench.

So, with these basic principles at work, it makes sense to remember these “Five Indisputable Rules of Bunker Play”

  1. Firmer sand will provide more rejection force – open the club less and play the ball back a little to steepen the bottom of the clubhead path.
  2. Softer sand will provide less rejection force – open the club more and play the ball slighter further forward in your stance to create a flatter clubhead path through the impact zone.
  3. The ball will come out on a path roughly halfway between the alignment of your body and the direction the face is pointing – the more you open the face, the further left your body should be aligned.
  4. On downslope or upslope lies, try to set your body at right angles to the lie, so that your swing path can be as close to parallel with the ground as possible, so this geometry can still work. Remember that downhill slopes reduce the loft of the club and uphill slopes increase the loft.
  5. Most recreational golfers are going to hit better shots from the rough than the bunkers, so play away from them when possible (unless bunker play is your strength).

So, there you go, Art. I hope this gives you the basics you were seeking.

As always, I invite all of you to send in your questions to be considered for a future article. It can be about anything related to golf equipment or playing the game–just send it in. You can’t win if you don’t ask!

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Golf’s Perfect Imperfections: Task to target

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In this week’s episode: How having a target will improve your direction and contact you have with the ball.

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