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TaylorMade’s new M3 and M4 irons, with “RibCOR” technology

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With its new M3 and M4 irons, TaylorMade has introduced a “RibCOR” technology that’s designed to produce more speed on mishits. Before we get into what exactly that design is, let’s see why this concept is important.

COR, or coefficient of restitution, is the measure of energy transfer between two objects. For golf club manufacturers, especially when making game-improvement irons, the goal is to get COR as high as possible; this means ensuring as much energy gets transferred from the club face to the golf ball as possible during impact. Of course, the USGA sets a limit on COR of golf clubs so they can only go so far.

Many companies these days have figured out how to maximize COR on the center of the club face. Now, the game for engineers across the industry has become “how high can we make COR on shots hit off-center.” The goal obviously being to produce as much speed on off-center hits as possible, or, minimizing energy loss at impact.

TaylorMade, for its new M3 and M4 irons, has introduced RibCOR technology that uses two ribs, or beams, on the outer portions of the heel and toe as pictured below.

This provides internal support on the outer portions of the club so that the face can flex as much as possible at impact, thus retaining energy transfer from the club the golf ball. So while the center of the face may not produce more speed compared to its M1 and M2 predecessors, this design should impart more ball speed across the face. That means more forgiveness, or MOI (moment of inertia).

The RibCOR design couples with a number of familiar technologies from the company’s past including inverted cone technology, speed pockets and face slots. These are all designed for to produce higher ball speeds and more forgiveness, helping golfers who don’t hit the center of the face every time to launch the ball high and far.

As with the M1 and M2 irons they replace, the lower-numbered M3 iron has a more compact look and is designed for slightly better players, whereas the higher-numbered M4 iron is built for more distance and forgiveness, and has a larger head profile.

For more photos and discussion click here, or read below for more info on each of the offerings. Both the M3 and M4 irons will be available at retail on February 16.

Taylormade M4 irons

As the more forgiving of the two M-family offerings, TaylorMade’s M4 irons have fluted hosels, 1mm toplines, and what TaylorMade calls its “thinnest ever leading edge.” Also, along with the RibCOR technology that’s in both the M3 and M4 irons, additional mass has been placed on the toe and heel portions of the M4 irons to produce great forgiveness on off-center hits.

Overall, the M4 club heads have 24 percent higher MOI than the M2 2017 heads, according to TaylorMade, so golfers will find them to be more forgiving than their predecessors.

The M4 irons (4-LW) will come stock with either KBS Max 85 steel shafts (R and S flex), Fujikura Atmos shafts (5A, 6R, 7S), or additional custom shafts, with TM Dual Feel grips. Steel will sell for $899 per set, while graphite will sell for $999.

Taylormade M3 irons

The TaylorMade M3 irons, while housing some of the same technologies as the M4 irons, are made for those players who want a more compact shape and are looking for more trajectory control. To help achieve this look without sacrificing much by way of forgiveness, TaylorMade ha added a 15-gram tungsten weight to the soles of the M3 irons; this lowers CG in the head.

The irons have a 180-degree fluted hosel — that means it’s not as visible at address compared to the 360-degree fluted hosel in the M4 irons — to help move weight away from the heel. The irons have a thinner topline than the M1 irons they replace, according to TaylorMade, and have soles designed with more bounce for better turf interaction.

M3 sets (3-SW) come stock with either True Temper XP100 steel shafts (R300, S300), Mitsubishi’s Tensei graphite shafts (70R or 80S), or additional custom shafts, and with Lamkin UTx NC grips. M3 irons will sell for $999 with steel shafts or $1199 with graphite.

Click here for more photos and discussion on the M3 and M4 irons

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He played on the Hawaii Pacific University Men's Golf team and earned a Masters degree in Communications. He also played college golf at Rutgers University, where he graduated with a Bachelor of Arts in Journalism.

5 Comments

5 Comments

  1. S

    Jan 9, 2018 at 12:26 pm

    I can see why pros are leaving TM…

    • ran

      Jan 30, 2018 at 10:11 am

      Wonder if the M3 and M4 have the same face caving issue that the M1/M2 irons have…..many people reporting face cave on irons….TM just replaces them with same iroins that eventually cave again.

  2. Tom Newsted

    Jan 3, 2018 at 10:52 am

    RIBCORE they stole that from their time with Addidas. That has been on a hockey stick for years. its a gimmick.

  3. mel

    Jan 2, 2018 at 8:32 pm

    TM M3 and M4 state-of-the-art iron designs look like winners to me, and leaving behind all those offering gel-filled hollow irons …. opps that means the P790 are obsolete now …lol … that was fast … lolol

  4. George

    Jan 2, 2018 at 12:33 pm

    i need me some ribcor

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Equipment

Srixon launches new Soft Feel Brite golf balls

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Srixon has introduced the second generation of its Soft Feel Brite golf balls which arrive in highly visible orange, green and red color codes.

The new additions from Srixon feature the brand’s softest FastLayer Core to date, with the core beginning soft in the center and transitioning to a firmer perimeter in design to offer equal parts distance and feel.

Srixon’s matte visual performance technology aims to provide improved visibility on the new Soft Feel Brite balls, while the ball’s 338 Speed Dimple Pattern is designed to reduce drag at launch and increase lift during descent.

The Soft Feel Brite balls also feature a soft, thin cover which bids to provide more greenside spin and softer feel on all pitches, chips and putts.

“Soft Feel Brite delivers all the benefits of the Soft Feel golf ball with additional matte color offerings. With the addition of the FastLayer Core, Soft Feel Brite provides the total package of enhanced distance, feel and visibility.” – Brian Schielke, Marketing Director at Srixon.

The Soft Feel Brite balls are available to purchase now at Srixon.com and cost $21.99 per dozen.

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Equipment

What irons do you play? – GolfWRXers discuss

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In our forums, our members have been discussing the irons that they currently play. WRXer ‘Vater’ asks members which brand they have in the bag and why, and you can see the results so far after 189 survey participants.

Here are a few posts from the thread, but make sure to check out the entire discussion and have your say at the link below.

  • Vater: “I use Titleist 718 AP1s because they cost less new than some used clubs, haha. In all seriousness, I love the quality overall, and specifically, I was looking for a set with a good GW – and most of all, I wanted to play a 4 iron again, and the 4 and 5 irons in the 718 AP1s are beastly.”
  • aadadams: “I use Taylormade Speedblades for about the last 6 years, they still work great for my game, and I don’t see a change in the near future.”
  • Celebros: “Cobra Forged Tour.”
  • jholz: “I am Cleveland, but towards the latter end of the glory days – CG7 Tours. About as good a club as money can buy. Wish I could find some CG7 Tour Concepts!”
  • gripandrip: “Srixon 745’s. Most likely may be looking to the ZX7 as a possible replacement. Love my Srixon irons.”

Entire Thread: “The irons used by GolfWRXers”

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Whats in the Bag

Danielle Kang’s winning WITB: 2020 Drive On Championship

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Driver: TaylorMade M4 (8.5 degrees)
Shaft: Basileus Leggero 2 50 S

5-wood: Titleist TS3
Shaft: Mitsubishi Tensei AV Blue 60 S

Hybrids: Titleist 816 H2 (19, 23 degrees)
Shaft: Mitsubishi Diamana Blue S+ 70 HY S

Irons: Titleist 716 CB (5-9)
Shaft: Nippon N.S. Pro

Wedges: Titleist Vokey SM7 (46-08, 50-12F, 54-08M, 58-08M)

Putter: Scotty Cameron Prototype

Ball: Titleist Pro V1x

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