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Titleist introduces new limited-edition Vokey Design AD-siXty wedges

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Aaron Dill, the PGA Tour rep for Vokey wedges, was hand-picked for the job by Master Craftsmen Bob Vokey, according to Titliest, and he has spent the last 10 years learning from Bob Vokey himself. Dill, or “AD,” has also established a cult-like following among equipment aficionados for his one-off wedge stampings on the wedges of tour players, most notably for the popular hip-hop lyrics on Justin Thomas’ wedges and cult-classic movie quotes on Morgan Hoffmann’s wedges.

Screen Shot 2017-09-19 at 1.55.03 PM

Now, Dill created his own limited-edition “AD-siXty” Vokey wedges, which were inspired by conversations with Geoff Ogilvy, and they will sell for a starting price of $250 on September 20 through WedgeWorks.

“I spoke with Geoff (Ogilvy) and we got on the topic of Australian golf courses and how they related to courses in America,” Dill said. “I asked him some questions and came up with an idea to complement the firm, links-style conditions that players face. Geoff was always a low-bounce player in his 60 (degree wedge). Originally, he used a T-grind, then was introduced to the L, and that has remained a good friend since. I used original chassis that he had in the L and removed the ribbon, taking the bounce down.”

The AD-siXty wedge has four degrees of bounce and it’s most similar to the L grind, according to Dill, but the AD-siXty has a lower bounce angle in the front of the wedge helping it sit closer to the ground, and it’s designed for a higher flight. It’s especially made for those who play from firm conditions and for bunker play, and the grind has heel, toe and trailing edge relief. The wedges will also be equipped with Vokey’s TX4 groove technology for maximum spin, progressive center of gravity for distance and launch control, and they have a Brushed Nickel finish.

“The AD-siXty will be very different than the low bounce 60-06K,” Dill said. “It will flight higher and be less bounce in most situations, which makes it a great option for firm conditions and bunkers. This wedge is most similar to the L Grind (60-04), but it has lower bounce angle in the front, which makes it sit closer to the ground. With the ribbon removed, players may also notice a somewhat smoother feel and a faster glide through the rough.”

Dill’s limited-edition wedges can be personalized with stampings up to eight characters and with one-of-12 paintfill colors, as well as custom grips, shaft bands and ferrules. They will come stock with BV Wings grips. Click here for more information and purchasing.

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16 Comments

16 Comments

  1. Lars Jolt

    Nov 20, 2017 at 10:25 am

    This screams MIZUNO! NO wonder they are better looking and more refined tham the ugly Titliest wedges.

  2. MrWolf

    Sep 21, 2017 at 9:45 am

    $250 for a cast wedge? No thanks.

  3. Irma

    Sep 21, 2017 at 2:17 am

    Seriously. Titleist is on a losing slide, and they know it. All they do it copy what others are doing, and not even doing that very well.

  4. The dude

    Sep 20, 2017 at 10:03 pm

    Still not forged…..Fu Off!

  5. Mike

    Sep 20, 2017 at 5:50 pm

    More sausage machine wedges from Vokey. Ho Hum.. Must be Christmas bonus time

  6. Jack

    Sep 20, 2017 at 4:42 pm

    This grind might be fine for the sandbelt courses of Australia. Not so much in the US, where even scratch players would have problems using them effectively.

  7. Sam

    Sep 20, 2017 at 4:14 pm

    I’d rather have a JP than an AD

  8. Andrew

    Sep 20, 2017 at 1:35 pm

    Sorry. No address pics and the grind is a ripoff from the old Cleveland 588s.

    • BIG STU

      Sep 21, 2017 at 3:14 am

      I was thinking the same thing myself Andrew since I am a big fan of the OLD 588s

  9. Boss

    Sep 20, 2017 at 1:18 pm

    Shank! What’s with the Mizuno copy of the “AD” in the circle?

  10. Old Gaffer

    Sep 20, 2017 at 1:07 pm

    I love the rusty Titleist wedges, they look naturally awesome!
    Why don’t they leave the other irons as raw forgings and let them rust too?

  11. C

    Sep 20, 2017 at 10:10 am

    A limited edition Vokey? You don’t say.

  12. Chris B

    Sep 20, 2017 at 9:26 am

    I love the “sixty” stamp and the colour.

  13. Joe

    Sep 20, 2017 at 9:07 am

    what’s ‘introdcued’? Sounds interesting.

  14. carl spackler

    Sep 20, 2017 at 8:54 am

    i’d pay $250 if it was a raw wedge arron dill ground himself. but not for some cast copy

    • Caddy

      Sep 20, 2017 at 12:28 pm

      I understand, but grinding can take awhile. That’s really why they only personally grind for tour pros. He will effectively make a prototype and then they semi-mass produce them. The heads prepped for grinding are likely cast from carbon steel just like the mass produced models and the final shape is literally the same. It will glide through the turf the same too. When Ogilvey gets a replacement, it may very well be the production model.

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Equipment

Everything you need to know about TaylorMade’s new GAPR Lo, Mid and Hi clubs

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The Golden Years of wood-style hybrids and hybrid innovation in the marketplace are over, Tomo Bystedt, the Senior Director of Product Creation for TaylorMade, told GolfWRX.

Based on data collected from the company’s myRoundPro app and TrackMan data from its fitting facility, called “The Kingdom,” Bystedt says TaylorMade has found that most golfers are “not very good” with irons higher than a 5-iron, and while some hit the 3 wood very well, they struggle with 5/7/9 woods and hybrid-style clubs. Bystedt also acknowledges that Tour players have moved away from hybrid-style golf clubs as we know them, and into driving-iron-style clubs instead; they provide better control and offer greater distance in certain conditions, he says.

So, golfers of all skill levels need to fill the gap between a 5-iron and a 3-wood, and thus, TaylorMade has designed a new family of golf clubs called GAPR, pronounced “gapper.”

The family consists of a GAPR Lo, a GAPR Mid and a GAPR Hi. The clubs are made with C300 faces and 450 stainless steel bodies, with the company’s familiar SpeedFoam between the faces and bodies for durability of the face and to improve overall sound and feel due to the vibration dampening qualities of the foam. They also have “blind slots,” according to Bystedt, or in other words, speed slots on their soles that are not bore-thru slots. Each of the GAPR irons have adjustable loft sleeves, as well.

TaylorMade’s new GAPR clubs will be available on August 24 and sell for $250 apiece with stock KBS graphite shafts and Golf Pride Tour Velvet 360 grips. More specs and info on each of the offerings below.

See what GolfWRX Members are saying about GAPR irons in our forums.

GAPR Lo

We’ve spotted Tiger Woods testing a GAPR Lo at Carnoustie, and Bystedt says other big name pros including Dustin Johnson are testing it, as well. There are a few GAPR Lo irons that have a fixed hosel that are floating around in Tour bags, but the retail versions have an adjustable hosel.

The GAPR Lo irons have a weight port (filled with either steel or tungsten weights) placed in the back for head weight purposes and are not interchangeable weights by the user. The head shape of the GAPR Lo is slightly bigger than the P-790 UDI clubs, according to Bystedt, and more similar to the Tour Preferred UDI. That’s because player feedback suggested the P-790 UDI was a bit too small, and players wanted a slightly bigger size.

Retail offerings of the GAPR Lo will include 17, 19 and 22 degree options, ranging from 40.25 inches to 39.25 inches, respectively.

GAPR Mid

The GAPR Mid iron has a bigger profile than the GAPR Lo, and has CG (center of gravity) lower in the club head for higher launch and more forgiveness. The weight port is on the sole of the club, as opposed to the back cavity as seen on the GAPR Lo iron. The soles are also wider, making these more playable for players from the turf.

The GAPR Mid irons are offered in 18, 21 and 24 degree lofts, ranging from 40.25 to 39.25 inches, respectively.

GAPR Hi

TaylorMade’s GAPR Hi irons have an even bigger profile and wider soles than the GAPR Mid irons, and the CG is lower and deeper for an even higher launch and greater forgiveness. The shaping of the club is like the child of a driving iron and a wood-style hybrid; according to a TaylorMade press release, it “features modern Rescue shaping with a high-toe, peanut shaped clubhead.” It also has bulge and roll on the face to help with off-center hits. Additionally, the SpeedFoam in the GAPR Hi is slightly less dense than the rest of the offerings, according to Bystedt, because the density of the original foam was raising CG and deadening sound too much; he calls it “SpeedFoam lite” in the GAPR Hi.

The GAPR Hi is offered in 19, 22, 25 and 28 degree lofts, ranging from 40.75 inches to 39.25 inches, respectively.

See what GolfWRX Members are saying about GAPR irons in our forums.

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Hand-painted Callaway Create headcovers are now up for auction

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As part of its Callaway Create platform, Callaway teamed up with artists from around the globe to produce 32 hand-painted headcovers. The headcovers are each hand-stitched and weather-proofed by Seamus Golf in Portland, Oregon.

Below are a few examples, but check out the website here to see all of the designs.

Each of the 32 headcovers are individually named by the authors, given names such as “Banana Slice,” “Cartpool Karaoke” and “Freaky Fourball,” among other creative, golf-related names.

The headcovers are now available at auction, and the proceeds will serve to benefit Bunkers in Baghdad. Here is more information about the organization, as per the Callaway website:

All auction proceeds go to Bunkers in Baghdad, an organization dedicated to sending new and used golf balls, clubs, and equipment to our troops around the world, with a focus on the brave men and women currently serving in combat zones. Bunkers also supplies golf equipment to our vets and warriors around the country to aid in their recreation and rehabilitation.  It has collected and shipped 9 million golf balls and 700,000 golf clubs to our troops, vets and warriors in more than 65 countries around the world and all 50 states.

Click here to enter the auction, and click here to read more about Bunkers in Baghdad.

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Full details on Ping’s new i500 and i210 irons, and Glide Forged wedges

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In recent weeks, we’ve spotted a number of different Ping irons and wedges. We saw Tony Finau testing an i500 driving iron, we saw Bubba Watson using Glide Forged wedges, and we also spotted photos of a new i210 iron. The problem was, Ping wasn’t giving up any information on the new clubs, so we didn’t know when or if they’d would be released to the public, or what was different about the new products.

Now, we have all of the info on the Ping i500 and i210 irons, and the Ping Glide Forged wedges. We were lucky enough to have Marty Jertson, Director of Product Development at Ping and a recent 2018 PGA Championship qualifier, on our Two Guys Talking Golf (TG2) podcast to explain the designs and technology for the three different product releases. Snippets from the full podcast are embedded below. Additionally, we provide all of the necessary spec and pricing information.

All of the products are now available for custom fitting or pre-order at authorized Ping shops around the United States.

Click here for comparison photos against PXG, Artisan and P-790 clubs.

Ping i500 irons

The Ping i500 is actually quite similar to the G700 iron, which also has a hollow-body construction, but yet the i500 has a sleeker-shaped profile. The i500 irons are built with C300 maraging steel faces and 17-4 stainless steel bodies; Ping says this design increases ball speed, lowers spin and creates higher-flying shots.

Available in 3-PW and UW, the Ping i500 irons will sell for $175 per club with a steel shaft and $190 per club with a graphite shaft. Stock steel shafts will be the True Temper Dynamic Gold 105 (R300, S300), stock graphite shafts will be the UST Mamiya Recoil ES SMAC (760A, 780R, 780S), and a number of aftermarket shafts are also available at no upcharge. The stock grip is the Golf Pride Tour Velvet (Blue -1/16 inches, Red -1/32 inches, Aqua -1/64 inches, White Std., Gold +1/32 inches, Orange +1/16 inches).

In-hand photos of the new Ping i500 irons

Ping i210 irons

Replacing the i200 irons, the new i210 irons are made from 431 stainless steel, and they have a larger and softer elastomer insert. The bigger insert is said to not only increase perimeter weighting for greater forgiveness, but also to help fine-tune swing weight and create an overall softer feel. The shaping of the irons have also been refined, according to Ping.

Available in 3-PW and UW, the Ping i210 irons will sell for $137.50 per iron with a steel shaft, and $152.50 per iron with a graphite shaft. The stock steel offering is a True Temper Dynamic Gold 120 (S300, X100), the graphite offering is an Alta CB (Soft R, Regular, Stiff), and there are a number of aftermarket options with no upcharge.

In-hand photos of the new Ping i210 irons

Ping Glide Forged wedges

Forged from 8620 carbon steel, the new Ping Glide Forged wedges have a “sleek, high-spinning blade-style design with a soft, pleasing feel,” according to a Ping press release. They’re the product of Louis Oosthuizen, Stan Utley and Todd Anderson working with Ping Engineers to develop a wedge with greater feel and versatility, says Ping. Like the Glide 2.0 wedges, the new Glide Forged wedges have wheel-cut grooves, which have a sharp edge radius to increase friction for more spin and trajectory control.

The new Glide Forged wedges are also customizable with different graphics, stamping and paint fills, which are highlighted below.

  • Graphic Options: Mr. PING logo, American flag, Arizona desert scene, Boomerang
  • Stamping Options: 1) Up to three characters (A-Z, 0-9) in one of three locations (toe, center or heel); 2) Two characters applied in scattered fashion; 3) Mr. PING logo scattered.
  • Paint-fill options: Black, Gold, Brown, Orange, Purple, Red, Blue, Yellow, Green, White, Silver, Maroon

Check out ping.com/glideforgedcustom to design your wedges.

Ping’s new Glide Forged wedges are available in 50, 52, 54, 56, 58 and 60 degree lofts, and they will sell for $217.50 per wedge with a steel shaft and $232.50 per wedge with a graphite shaft. The stock steel shaft will be a True Temper Dynamic Gold S300, the graphite shaft will be an Alta CB (Soft R, Regular, Stiff), and there are more aftermarket shafts available at no upcharge.

Listen to the full podcast on SoundCloud below, or click here to listen on iTunes!

In-hand photos of the new Ping Glide Forged wedges.

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