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TaylorMade Expands Forged Iron Offerings With P-730, P-790

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“Like a surgeon’s scalpel.”

That’s how TaylorMade’s Senior Director of Irons, Tomo Bystedt, describes the company’s new P-730 irons, which he and his team designed to meet the needs of three of the top-ranked golfers in the world: Rory McIlroy, Justin Rose, and Dustin Johnson.

Dustin Johnson has been testing Taylormade's P730 irons.

Dustin Johnson has been testing Taylormade’s P-730 irons.

“It’s pretty simple,” Bystedt says. “These guys have incredibly sensitive hands. When [Dustin Johnson] wants to hit a 5-yard cut into a right pin, you don’t see him doing anything differently. He just does it. What these players need is a very low-inertia club that they can [manipulate] easily, almost like a surgeon’s scalpel.”

Discussion: See what GolfWRXers are saying about the P-730 irons

Give average golfers a set of musclebacks like the P-730, and their results probably won’t be surgical. More than likely, they’ll butcher their scorecard. That’s where TaylorMade’s new P-790 irons come in. They aim to merge the classic look and feel of muscleback irons with the boost in distance and forgiveness that’s possible from the latest technologies.

TaylorMade_P790_Face

The P-790 irons debut a new construction from TaylorMade, using 4140 steel club faces that are forged into an L-shape. The club faces wrap around the sole of the irons, where they’re welded to iron bodies made of 8630 steel. The design allowed TaylorMade engineers to make the leading edge of the irons thinner and more consistent, according to Bystedt, which helps improve the distance and consistency of the irons.

What’s most intriguing about the P-790 irons, however, is what golfer can’t see. There’s a screw on the toe of each iron, which is an access port to the inside of the club. Through it, TaylorMade fills each P-790 iron with a lightweight, flexible material it calls “Speed Foam.” The Speed Foam serves two purposes, the first of which is providing support to the club face so that TaylorMade designers could make it thinner to improve the distance and forgiveness of the irons. The filler also helps absorb vibrations during impact, which creates a more desirable feel.

TaylorMade_P790_Address

In the two years TaylorMade spent developing the P-790 irons, it tested several filler materials, one of which was thermoplastic elastomer (TPE), the material PXG uses to fill the inside of its 0311 irons. “The problem with the TPE is that it completely kills your COR,” Bystedt says.

256286-P790-17_Exploded Club V3-a7a2ec-original-1503332771

COR, or coefficient of restitution, is the measure of spring-like effect of a golf club. The higher the number, the faster a golf ball rebounds off the club face. To keep the COR of the P-790 irons as high as possible, TaylorMade’s iron design developed Speed Foam. Think of it like EVA, or ethylene vinyl acetate, the cushioning material used in running shoe, Bystedt says. Then think of something “much softer and less dense than that.”

TaylorMade_P790_Back

There is a place for density in the P-790 irons, and it comes in the way of tungsten weights that are positioned inside the irons, which weigh as much as 11 grams. They’re positioned uniquely in each iron to create a center of gravity (CG) that’s directly in the center of the club face.

Compared to TaylorMade’s PSi irons, which the P-790 irons replace, Bystedt calls the shaping “more angular.” They also have a “slightly flatter sole.” “It’s clearly a players iron,” Bystedt says. “We’re not targeting this for the 0-5 guy, but we’re confident that the guy who’s a 10-handicap, avid golfer, is going to be able to play this.”

TaylorMade_P790_Sole

The P-790’s L-shaped club faces are welded to the bodies the irons at their “Speed Pocket,” a slot on the sole that increases face flexion for more distance and consistency.

The P-790 irons will sell for $1299.99 with steel shafts, $1499.99 with graphite shafts for an eight-piece set. They’re available in 3-PW, AW. The stock steel shaft is True Temper’s Dynamic Gold 105. The stock graphite shaft is a new model from UST Mamiya, the company’s 760/780 ES SmacWrap. They’ll be in stores Sept. 15.

The P-730 irons ($1399.99 for an eight-piece set) are available in 3-PW on Nov. 1. The stock shaft is True Temper’s Dynamic Gold S300.

Discussion: See what GolfWRXers are saying about the P-790 irons in our forum.

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Zak is the Editor-in-Chief of GolfWRX.com. He's been a part of the company since 2011, when he was hired to lead GolfWRX's Editorial Department. Zak developed GolfWRX's Featured Writer Program, which supports aspiring writers and golf industry professionals. He played college golf at the University of Richmond (Go Spiders!) and still likes to compete in tournaments. You can follow Zak on Twitter @ZakKoz, where he's happy to discuss his game and all the cool stuff that's part of his job.

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44 Comments

44 Comments

  1. Fredo

    Sep 12, 2017 at 10:37 pm

    Breaking News… PXG just filed a lawsuit against Taylormade and the distributors for patent infringement. Better buy em quick, haha.

  2. AV

    Aug 31, 2017 at 12:19 am

    TM call the 790 “forged construction” on their website:
    Wonder how much is actually forged in the overall construction of the clubhead.
    Sounds ambiguous and even misleading to me.

    • AV

      Aug 31, 2017 at 12:20 am

    • Golf Engineer

      Sep 26, 2017 at 11:11 am

      Can anybody tell us if the P-790 is ‘fully’ forged back and face, or, is it ‘co-forged’ with a cast steel back and a thin roll forged face plate welded to the steel back? There seems to be some contradictory reporting on this issue, like here:
      —————————
      It’s not quite all forged though, as the wrap around face is forged from 4140 Carbon Steel and then welded onto a cast 8620 carbon steel body. Therefore the bit you hit the ball with is forged, so you have that feel….”
      http://www.golfalot.com/equipment-reviews/taylormade-p790-irons-review-3888.aspx
      ——————–
      “The key to the P790 performance is a hollow, cavity-free construction that features forged 8620 carbon steel in the body and forged 4140 carbon steel in the clubface.
      http://www.golf.com/equipment/2017/08/22/first-look-taylormade-p790-forged-irons
      ———————
      From what I see of the exploded internal view of the P790, the body looks too complex to be a forging. So who is right? Golfalot.com or Golf.com.?
      GolfWRX Staff must investigate and inform us…. fully forged or co-forged? Ask TM because putting the word “forged” on a cast hosel may be disingenuous.

  3. Realist

    Aug 26, 2017 at 10:08 am

    I’ll pick these up on the Bay in about 3 weeks for $200.

  4. JR

    Aug 25, 2017 at 12:03 pm

    Buttocks!

  5. Derrick

    Aug 25, 2017 at 12:25 am

    The Magic of Tungsten and TPE jello inside the hollow heads makes impact sweeeet. I love the new technology from the technologically advanced OEMs.

  6. Tippy Canoe

    Aug 24, 2017 at 11:33 am

    Cool, I was wondering when the R9 irons were going to come back. All you have to do with the big boys, is research what they did 10-15 years ago. Nothing is new…buy some lessons people! Titleist is also on the move towards Gimmick Land now that went public, but still the best bang for your disposable bucks!

  7. Allan

    Aug 24, 2017 at 1:05 am

    P-790 —- Hollow body, foam injected, tungsten toe weight, forged face. This is not a golf club, it’s a sucker club for incompetent wannabe golfers.

  8. MAGA

    Aug 23, 2017 at 2:02 pm

    Fake forged

    • Bert

      Aug 28, 2017 at 7:47 pm

      Agree +1 guess the definition of a forged club is ambiguous at best.

  9. Chris

    Aug 23, 2017 at 8:43 am

    Epon 502s with the Inner Gel comes to mind.

  10. Rich Douglas

    Aug 22, 2017 at 9:16 pm

    Where’s the SL version? Oh, right. Pass.

  11. rex235

    Aug 22, 2017 at 7:05 pm

    The Taylor Made P-790 model is this generations Beauwood PSS (perfect sweet spot) iron model, with
    adjustable weighting and urethane reinforced interiors. Made in the early ’80s.

    The Taylor Made P-730 in the latest refinement of the Mizuno MS-9/MP-11 iron models. Offered in late ’80s, early ’90s by Mizuno.

    You should be able to compare these designs with these “new” iron models from TaylorMade.

    Neither Beauwood nor Mizuno offered these iron models LH, so even though it is 2017, and these designs have been around for a while, both appear to be new versions of the RH Only theme.
    Because… “tiny.”

    • Heich

      Aug 22, 2017 at 8:38 pm

      Another new ID, Obs? Why can’t you just stay away and take your pills

  12. Phil

    Aug 22, 2017 at 5:19 pm

    Mizuno > Taylormade

  13. FyearoldGolfer

    Aug 22, 2017 at 2:49 pm

    My local Pro is a Taylormade Rep, I’ll ask him what his fitted price is on a new set of clubs. Thinking $1100 for the P730’s. Oh, don’t forget our “new” 10% sales tax rate.

  14. Engineer Jim

    Aug 22, 2017 at 1:57 pm

    Only the face of the P-790 is forged. The body is a complex casting if you look at the blow-up picture of the head internals. You could never forge a complex body like that. TM have ‘forged’ on the hosel but that’s only marketing deception.

    • BV

      Aug 22, 2017 at 4:13 pm

      Ya they are ‘forged’ like in ‘fake’.

    • rex235

      Aug 23, 2017 at 12:42 am

      I agree, the P790 body is cast steel and the thin face is forged. Why they put ‘forged’ on the cast hosel is puzzling but it’s wrong and deceptive. TM should just fess up and admit as much.

  15. Dat

    Aug 22, 2017 at 12:22 pm

    The P-790 irons will sell for $1299.99 with steel shafts, $1499.99 with graphite shafts for an eight-piece set. They’re available in 3-PW, AW. The stock steel shaft is True Temper’s Dynamic Gold 105. The stock graphite shaft is a new model from UST Mamiya, the company’s 760/780 ES SmacWrap.

    The P-730 irons ($1399.99 for an eight-piece set) are available in 3-PW on Nov. 1. The stock shaft is True Temper’s Dynamic Gold S300.

    Is there going to be a reasonably priced set?

  16. The Dude

    Aug 22, 2017 at 11:08 am

    In an effort to clean up the club….2 why use 730’s…just use 7.

  17. CCGolfTx

    Aug 22, 2017 at 10:23 am

    These clubs actually intrigue me. Seems like they out. Lot of thought into the construction but did not Callaway us on the price.

  18. Shanklampard147

    Aug 22, 2017 at 10:02 am

    I call on all lefties to boycott taylormade. No 730’s in left hand is a joke. I was going to get the new m1 woods but now I can’t give them my money and still look at myself in the mirror. As sad as it is, I might have to go to pxg. They are the only company that makes every club available to lefties.

    • Ummmm

      Aug 22, 2017 at 10:53 am

      Easy to be able to afford the production of lh irons when you overcharge like PXG does

      Boycott them? They can’t make everything for your side of the ball, it’s not fiscally responsible. If you owned a golf club company and wanted to make a ton of high end LH stuff you wouldn’t be in business long.

      • Shanklampard147

        Aug 22, 2017 at 2:06 pm

        It’s easy though, all they need to do it a little research. How many bad left handed golfers do you see? In Minnesota it’s rare. On the other hand, the majority of right handed golfers are hacks, so they can play the big clunky irons. Blades and small cb’s for lefties, clunky cast giants for you righties.

      • LeftyBlades

        Aug 22, 2017 at 6:00 pm

        PING…every club RH or LH, and never a doubt about product quality or performance.

    • Heich

      Aug 22, 2017 at 11:28 am

      You can go to Callaway, Shank. And have a nice day.

    • gioreeko

      Aug 22, 2017 at 1:11 pm

      Just play righty. I can swing lefty almost as well as I do righty. Practice, or quit whining.

      • Shanklampard147

        Aug 22, 2017 at 2:00 pm

        Serious question, Is producing enough drivers and woods for every citizen of the world fiscally responsible? There are more taylormade drivers in PGA superstores than there are golfers in this country.

        • Heich

          Aug 22, 2017 at 3:41 pm

          Lets not exaggerate, shall we, Shankpard?

          • Shanklampard147

            Aug 22, 2017 at 4:36 pm

            I apologize, that was for the guys telling me to learn to play right handed. That wasn’t directed at you.

      • Shanklampard147

        Aug 22, 2017 at 4:33 pm

        Good response, moron. That would be like me telling you to stop liking guys. We are all born how we are born.

    • Mike

      Aug 22, 2017 at 4:10 pm

      Learn to play right handed.. problem solved.

  19. Chuck

    Aug 22, 2017 at 9:49 am

    “Speed Foam” LOL is that like Flubber?

    • birdy

      Aug 22, 2017 at 11:43 am

      lol +1

      i think TM technology and engineering department is top notch.

      their marketing department needs revamped. the silly names are dumbing down their products

      • BV

        Aug 22, 2017 at 4:18 pm

        How about “Fast Foam” or “Shave Foam” — like shaving strokes off your game.

  20. Hcho

    Aug 22, 2017 at 9:47 am

    but where is the 2 iron UDI :(((

    • BV

      Aug 22, 2017 at 4:21 pm

      Since a 4i is really a 2i, a 2i would be a zero-iron.. or a -1i.

      • Hcho

        Aug 22, 2017 at 5:05 pm

        Lol I didnt check the lofts till you commented… that 19 degree 3 iron will do fine with a tour ad shaft

  21. DumbledoreBigD420

    Aug 22, 2017 at 9:39 am

    First!!!!

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Equipment

See what GolfWRX Members are saying about Mizuno’s new ST-180 driver

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Mizuno has recently released a new ST-180 driver that we spotted on Tour at the 2017 RSM Classic. The company’s “wave sole” technology makes an appearance for the first time in a Mizuno driver; the design is used to push weight low and forward to reduce spin rates, and the construction contracts and expands during impact to increase energy into the golf ball. The result is a lower-spinning driver, especially for those who hit down on the golf ball, and increased ball speeds across the face.

The ST-180 drivers have a new Forged SP700 Titanium face insert that allows the faces to be made thinner — saving weight from the face while increasing ball speeds — and they feature what the company calls a “Internal Waffle Crown” that saves weight to help shift CG (center of gravity) low and forward in the head.

There’s a slew of custom shafts available for no upcharge. The stock grip is Golf Pride’s M31 360, and the drivers are selling for $399.99, available in stores now.

Below is a collection of early feedback from GolfWRX members, and make sure to join the full discussion. See more photos of the ST-180 driver here.

Note: The posts below have been minimally edited for grammar and brevity.

GolfWRX Members comment on the new Mizuno ST-180 driver

TeeGolf: I’ve seen the ST180 driver [in person] and it looks like it sits perfectly square to me. And this is coming from someone who has been playing a Titleist driver set 1-degree open for the past 3 years. It doesn’t look closed at all. 

trhode: I’ve been playing the M2 all year. In comparison at address, the ST is very closed. I had 3 customers look at it yesterday too and they all had the same reaction: closed. That being said, I did play 18 on the simulator and hit some monster drives. The head, with the Raijin shaft, seems to be just a little lower spin than my TaylorMade M2. The blue finish doesn’t bother me either. 

akjell: Hit this yesterday at the Mizuno demo day yesterday at Eagle Ridge in Gilroy, CA. Far from a hook machine but definitely a bomber. The Mizuno’s reps put me in a Mitsubishi Tensei White 70X and I could hit this this driver on a string possibly a bit better than my M1. Of the Mizuno drivers of late, this has to be the best one.

odshot68: Ordering it today. Was fit and played a round with it. Optimal launch and spin. Tensei Blue 70x at 9.5 degrees. This is definitely not left bias; first Mizzy driver ever.

nmorton: Hit this today and it’s going in the bag. Just a classic head shape that suits my eye. Been messing around with a number of drivers over the past year and haven’t singled one out. Last long term driver I had was the 850. The ST checks all of the boxes for me…looks great down by the ball, sounds solid and performs as good as any other. What really sold me was how well slight mis-hits performed. I had the 12.5 dialed down so it definitely sat open a bit. Didn’t hit the fairway but it looks sharp as well. 

evoviiiyou: Had a chance to test the driver with a couple shafts last night. The head is definitely deeper than the JPX900 and the footprint seems bigger from he set up position, very confidence inspiring like the JPX900 but a little improved. Finish and graphics are very similar to the 900 which is very nice if you like the satin Mizuno blue and I do love it just like the satin black I recently had done to my JPX driver and 3 metal. 

regiwstruk: My current gamer is a Titleist 917D3, and this is definitely replacing that. I used a JPX 900 from November 2016 through June 2017 — biggest differences are the sound and that the distance is up there with at least one of the leaders in the market. Anxious to see how it does on the course! 

Paul065: It is high launch, low spin yes but I wouldn’t say it was targeted at the average golfer. It’s basically their version of Callaway Epic Sub Zero. Rory used the Sub Zero. 

Tommyj: I went down to Carls yesterday specifically to look at the ST180. I’ve read some comments that the face looks closed. When I picked it up it was in the 10.5D position and did look slightly closed but then looked perfectly square at 9.5D and also square at 10.5D which seemed sort of odd. The shape is not for me, I had a Cobra F6 and while the ST180 footprint isn’t that big its still substantial. I like blue on drivers and the ST180 has a real quality look to it with the matte finish, having said that I’m not sure I’d want to be looking at that shade of blue all the time. The sound was an absolute killer for me, it was completely unexpected because I always associate Mizuno with being traditional and understated… ST180 launch was lower than G400 in the neutral setting, about the same when I lofted the Ping down.  ST180 was noticeably lower than D2. Longest driver of the three was G400, followed by ST180 then D2. For me the ST180 had the widest dispersion with G400 being the most accurate (by a wide margin).

Discussion: Read more comments about the ST-180 driver here

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Spotted: Justin Rose is testing a new TaylorMade “Hi-Toe” wedge

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On Twitter today, Justin Rose posted a photo of a never-before-seen TaylorMade “Hi-Toe” 60-degree wedge. As the name suggests, it appears the toe portion is raised; we’ve seen this high-toe design from other manufacturers, and the benefits of those designs included increasing face area on open-faced shots, and shifting CG (center of gravity) to where it’s more beneficial for wedge play (likely higher for more spin and a lower flight).

The wedge is also stamped with “MG” to suggest it’s a “milled grind” wedge, much like TaylorMade’s popular wedge line that’s in stores now. There also appears to be slots behind the face, likely to also shift CG to where it’s deemed more beneficial.

Talks of a TaylorMade wedge with a high-toe design were actually started by Dustin Johnson a few weeks ago in a press conference. His full comments on that wedge are above, and you can join the discussion about the wedge in our forums.

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GolfWRX Exclusive: Patton Kizzire speaks on first PGA Tour win, WITB, new 718 irons

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Patton Kizzire nabbed his maiden PGA Tour win at last week’s OHL Classic, outlasting a late charge from Rickie Fowler. He raised his first Trophy with a bag full of Titleist equipment and a Titleist ProV1x.

Following the event, our Andrew Tursky had a revealing chat with Patton about the win and the clubs he used to do it.

GolfWRX: When you’re leading down the stretch, are you leaderboard watching? Does a big name like Rickie Fowler chasing you have any effect on your mentality/gameplan?

Patton Kizzire: For most of the tournament, I try not to look at the leaderboard. I took a long look on 15…and I just wanted to make sure nobody was ahead of Rickie and closer to me, and I just went from there.

GolfWRX: Do you get defensive or less aggressive down the stretch? Are you aiming away from pins, or are you ‘head down, keep it going’?

PK: It’s all situational. On difficult holes, maybe [I] play a bit more conservatively. I certainly wasn’t willing to take any chances with a three-stroke lead. I was playing the percentages. I maybe didn’t hit the best shots of the tournament there toward the end. The beginning of the back nine — 12, 13, 14 — were not my best tee shots. But I certainly wasn’t trying to play defensive. I was trying to play aggressively to conservative targets.

GolfWRX: Were there a lot of nerves coming home down the stretch?

PK: It was a little nerve wracking, but it wasn’t my first time in contention. I was able to draw on some of my near-misses, especially the Safeway Open last year. I was in a very similar spot on the weekend on Sunday, and I didn’t get it done, but I was able to look back at that and learn a little bit.

GolfWRX: It looks like you don’t do a whole lot of switching. You’ve still got a 913 Hybrid in the bag and a putter that’s been in the bag for years, too. What does your testing process look like when Titleist comes out with new equipment?

PK: Titleist has been really consistent for me since I was 15…I’ve played Titleist equipment almost exclusively since I was 15 or so. Every year it seems they come out with something new, and I have so much trust in it. It’s a pretty seamless transition. I don’t switch much. I try to put the new irons in play, the new driver, the new woods.

But something like a hybrid, you kind of have a club you fall in love with over the years, and I’ve been a little bit hesitant to switch that. The new balls, the new woods, the new irons are pretty easy for me to get into. And the Vokey team…have done such a great job with wedges”

And I have to mention the putter. The Scotty Cameron GoLo putter has been in my bag for about five years. And I owe a lot of my success to putting.

GolfWRX: Do you ever look to switch out your putter, or do you just kind of love that one and it works for you?

PK: I’ve toyed around with other putters here and there, but I always go right back to the GoLo. For whatever reason, maybe because I’ve used it so long, it just seems like what a putter should be. I feel really comfortable with it. I always gravitate back to the GoLo.

GolfWRX: What makes the wedges a good fit for you?

PK: The way they go through the turf. I like to have a strong leading edge to go through the turf. And the lob wedge needs to perform well around the greens and in the bunker. I’ve really been hitting my bunker shots well with my new 60 degree. I have different versions of the same wedges. Aaron [Dill] does great work in the truck. He kind of tweaks it here and there for me, and they perform like expect them to.

GolfWRX: How often do you switch out wedges?

PK: I get a new 60 degree the most…every four or five tournaments. New 56 and 52 every six to eight tournaments. I try to keep that 60 degree sharp. If we get to a course with firm greens and my wedge doesn’t have the bite that I want it to have, I’ll definitely give the Titleist guys a call.

GolfWRX: What kind of grind do you have on that 60?

PK: We call it the “Dufner grind.” I saw Jason Dufner had one like that about a year ago, and I told Aaron, “I want one like that.” I don’t know what the grind is, but it’s really good for me. [Note: The grind is a modified K grind.]

GolfWRX: One last question… How do the 718 irons look and feel different than the 716 irons?

PK: They don’t look a whole lot different. They’ve been holding their flight better in the wind. I’m able to get the long irons up in the air a little bit. That’s something I look for, being able to control the trajectory. I kind of imagine the shots that I want to hit, and the 718s are coming out on the flight that I want them to.

The good folks in New Bedford, Massachusetts, were kind enough to furnish us with some details about Kizzire’s setup.

Titleist tells us Kizzire switched to from the 915D4 driver to the 917D3 the first week it was available at the Quicken Loans National last year. He switched to the 718 irons to start the 2017-18 season at the Safeway. After missing the cut at in Napa, he has finished T10 (Sanderson Farms), 4th (Shriners Hospitals Open for Children) and then won the OHL Classic.

Titleist Tour Rep J.J. Van Wezenbeeck had this to say about working with Kizzire.

“Patton likes traditional look throughout his bag but needs vertical help with his angle of attack.  A 10.5 degree 917D3 helps him with launch but still controls his swing.  The shaft is based on a platform he had success with us early in his career and he really loves the feel.”

“The 917 F2 was a perfect fit for Patton early on.  He loved the ball speed and having a 16.5 allows him get great launch out of a club he has had trouble with in the past.  Titleist Tour Rep Jim Curran worked extensively on finding him a shaft that felt good, was the proper weight, and yet still launched the way Patton wanted. Tour Blue 95 fit the bill – and Patton has been in it for a year.”

“Patton loves the look of traditional irons and the 718 MB fit the bill for his look and his desire to control flight.  Now, as he moves up through his bag, he has multiple options in 718 which really helps his game. He moves to 718 CB at his 5 and 6 irons, and then carries the 718 T-MB at 4-iron which helps gapping and ball flight at the top of his set.”

Vokey Design Wedge rep Aaron Dill regarding Patton’s wedges:

“Patton has a old school approach to wedge selection.  When he finds a wedge he likes he will rarely make a switch. He doesn’t blame the wedge for poor or mishit shots. His technique is smooth and accurate with mid to high ball flight. His 52 and 56-degree wedges have been in the bag for a while now, and his 60 has changed a little keeping the width but changing the bounce angle for conditions. He likes an old school look which is why we add offset to his 60.”

Kelley Moser on Kizzire’s Cameron GoLo:

“Patton has been using a Scotty Cameron GoLo model since his mini tour days. The one he is currently using was a backup that was made for him when he first earned his PGA TOUR card. He had a stock shaft and silver head version that he used for a long time, but he wanted to shake it up a little so we made him one with a black shaft and a dark finish. He loved it and after his victory said he’s pretty sure this one is in the bag permanently.”

Many thanks to Patton for the talk and the folks at Titleist for sharing some insights on the newly minted PGA Tour winner’s WITB.

You can see Kizzire’s full WITB here

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