Connect with us

Equipment

Exotics new CBX Fairway Woods, a “Spin Killer”

Published

on

For golfers seeking a low-spinning, long-hitting fairway wood, there is officially a new product on the market to consider. While it may seem that every manufacturer claims to have to longest fairway wood on the market, an independent Iron Byron test showed the new Exotics CBX fairway woods to be the lowest-spinning and longest — by 16 yards — when compared to three of the most popular fairway woods today.

Self-labeled “Golf’s Most Solid Investment,” Tour Edge takes advantage of experienced designers and smaller production runs to create quality products. Its products sell under the brands of Exotics, Bazooka, and Hot Launch. The CBX line is the company’s most recent creation.

Exotics_CBX_Fairway_Wood_Address

We first spotted the CBX fairway woods at the WGC-Bridgestone Invitational.

The CBX boasts a plethora of design improvements to help maximize performance. To achieve absolutely precise weighting, a super-thin beta titanium cup face is combo-brazed to the hyper steel body of the head. The club face also has variable face thickness, which helps preserve distance on off-center strikes.

The most notable aspect of the club is the center of gravity location. A carbon sole unit helps move the CG forward, and the unique shape (longer toe-to-heel and shorter front-to-back) positions the CG in the optimal location to maximize distance. The club was playfully nicknamed the “spin killer” in production at Tour Edge.

Exotics_CBX_Club_Face_Fairway_Woods

Finally, the Speed Ramp Sole helps maintain speed and contact through impact and turf interaction. This sole was based off the extremely popular Slipstream “Waves” Soles on previous Exotics fairway wood models. The club looks simple at address, with a sleek, all-black crown and no alignment aids.

The CBX fairway woods ($349.99 each) will be in stores Sept. 5 in lofts of 13.5, 15, 16.5, and 18. Premium shaft options include the HZRDUS line by Project X, Aldila Rogue Silver and Black, Exotics Fujikura Pro, Mitsubishi Rayon Kuro Kage Silver Dual Core, Mitsubishi Rayon Diamana, and Mitsubishi Rayon Tensei CK Blue Series.

Related

Your Reaction?
  • 112
  • LEGIT12
  • WOW12
  • LOL3
  • IDHT4
  • FLOP1
  • OB1
  • SHANK6

Malcolm is currently a senior at Boston College High School in Massachusetts. He is a member of the varsity golf team, competes in junior events, and has a 2.7 index. He plays out of The Country Club in Brookline.

24 Comments

24 Comments

  1. Shawn

    Sep 12, 2017 at 12:10 pm

    Still gaming my MP Titanium 3 and 5 woods…Best feeling clubs I’ve ever hit.

  2. Chuck

    Sep 11, 2017 at 6:26 pm

    What is so curious to me about the CBX line is that it is introduced just a few months after the EX10 Beta, right? And by “a few months,” I mean only about six or seven months, right? Even Taylormade never rotated a line that quickly.

    Is there an explanation for this? Maybe there is something I am not getting, and if so I’d sure like to know about it. Is it possible that they came up with such a good design in the CBX they decided they couldn’t wait to get it out?

    I have hit a lot of really nice TEE fairways. I really want to try the CBX.

  3. Philip

    Aug 22, 2017 at 2:18 pm

    Do you know what the definition of “plethora” actually is? Regardless, nothing mentioned in the article related to this club is actually anything new, let alone ground-breaking. Besides, testing results can be so slanted before they even start … so it is 16 yards longer than the current competition, yet one of those was 10-16 yards longer than all the others, of which some in that group where 10-20 yards longer than all of the competition … yet no one on the golf is realizing all this amazing yardage for the most part. Heck, I can take an XXX stiff shaft 48 inches long and have the prized iron byron pound the ball out there … where is the context of these 16 yards, what was the clubhead speed, was iron byron coming OTT … if not for most the results are useless.

  4. elgordo

    Aug 22, 2017 at 11:48 am

    Looks a lot like the CB4 from several years ago. Prob spins a little less. You can get a CB4 on ebay for $50.

  5. Steve

    Aug 22, 2017 at 4:34 am

    The best thing about golf, buying new equipment and making the tee time….playing it is a distant third.

  6. Wizardofflatstickmountain

    Aug 21, 2017 at 9:33 pm

    The newest club I have is a Callaway mini driver I bought used.

    Driver: ping i25 driver bought in the plastic for $100.

    Irons: ping i20 custom fit for a song.

    Putter: ping wolverine $85.

    Woods: Callaway steelhead plus w/ Aldila NV shafts. Heads were $20 on eBay. Shafts were $45.

    The only ‘extravagance’ in my bag is a Bettinardi wedge I got for $80 at a show.

    I’m a 10 and I don’t practice.

    I’d much rather see a guy with all brand new everything across the tee box than someone w the rogues gallery I’ve got.

    • elgordo

      Aug 22, 2017 at 11:46 am

      Love this post. I hear so many people say golf is too expensive. It isn’t if you just look around a bit. IMO clubs really haven’t changed that much. And they certainly don’t change much from year to year.

    • Travis

      Aug 22, 2017 at 3:10 pm

      I buy clubs way too often and I’m a +4. I could easily stomp you with my “brand new clubs”. Shouldn’t make generalizations.

      • Wizardofflatstickmountain

        Aug 23, 2017 at 11:05 am

        If you quit telling people you’re a +4, you’d probably win more matches.

  7. DukeOH

    Aug 21, 2017 at 7:28 pm

    I love TEE’s CB line of fairways. Compact head (<160cc), Ti face, nice stock shafts.

    I know that their continued use of Titanium keeps their costs high, but if they want to charge $350, at least hire someone that's not blind from naked eye eclipse viewing to design better looking sole graphics. The worst!

  8. JustinR

    Aug 21, 2017 at 5:27 pm

    The OEM business model for golf equipment has drastically changed because golf participation is plummeting, particularly among the middle classes who can’t afford the game any more.
    The club market has shifted to the upper classes who don’t care about the cost and can buy whatever they desire. They can afford to buy the newest and most improved clubs.
    Of course one may wonder if the rich have more money than brains when it comes to golf equipment, and they are the new gearhead class. Those on the forum who decry the insanity have had enough and probably cannot justify the newest club models and reject the disingenuous promises that never stop.

  9. JOHN JAROSKY

    Aug 21, 2017 at 1:03 pm

    When is a company going to be created that makes really quality goods and will undercut these escalating prices from these major manufactures? Lets band together guys and girls and stop the madness. I can see the companies who shell out millions for advertising and huge player contracts charging what they do but would love to see a company come into the market that makes a great product at a fair price without all the other outside expenses the larger companies have that’s passed on to the consumer.

    • Simms

      Aug 21, 2017 at 2:57 pm

      It has been tried and has failed to many times, when a little guy trys something the big boys come in buy them out (if lucky) or put a law suit on them (they could win or not) that will drag on taking out every penny they have to fight….right now I think everyone should be looking at the Costco /Titlest battle…how long before Costco just pulls out on this one….remember when Callaway bought Top Flight the battle they had with Titlest over pattern infringement, that case was on books for a long time before settling out of court.

      • Tcann32

        Aug 22, 2017 at 8:50 am

        You’re right about most of it.
        When people talk about the Titleist / Costco deal, everyone seems to think that Titleist (Acushnet) is some mega giant company. They are huge in golf, but Costco is actually a much larger “company” than Acushnet as a whole, let alone Titleist itself. Costco’s yearly net profits match that of Acushnets net sales.

        The other part that isn’t mentioned is that these larger companies are losing money, and if they aren’t losing money, they aren’t really growing by much, outside of a couple of the companies. Titleist hasn’t grown and is losing more market share and TM is going down the path of Adams, the company they purchased to avoid patent infringements.

        The rest of it is dead on. Miura has been purchased, Toulon was purchased by Callaway (Although they Toulon is still his own entity), and the rest of the botique brands don’t generate enough interest to be bought, besides maybe one particular brand who’s owner has the capital to do whatever he really wants.

    • Steve

      Aug 21, 2017 at 3:23 pm

      Cheers! to that……….wait a year they will be 75 bucks…..

      • Caroline

        Aug 21, 2017 at 4:33 pm

        But the club companies are going to put a spin on how last years model is obsolete and you are going to feel like your still not playing the best….for fun find a couple golf digests or golf magazines from 7 or 8 years ago and read the club and ball ads…it will have you wanting those clubs and balls until you re-check the date of the magazine.

        • LF-Colton

          Aug 30, 2017 at 5:14 pm

          Golf is one of the sports where its okay to be a year or two behind the newest model. I think you’re onto something here with your last sentence. Don’t buy into the hype too much and just buy for your price range.

    • TheCityGame

      Aug 22, 2017 at 8:58 am

      They all already make quality goods. I’m playing equipment from 2009. It’s YOUR FAULT if you get suckered into the marketing every cycle.

    • Heich

      Aug 22, 2017 at 11:35 am

      Yeah. Bring down the Government, John. That would be the start.

  10. Geoff

    Aug 21, 2017 at 12:28 pm

    Love TEE, but I don’t know how they stay in business. Wait a year and these will be $120 brand new on ebay.

    • Simms

      Aug 21, 2017 at 2:59 pm

      Agree, you can barley get the tags off the shaft and they have a new and better model out there.

  11. Doug A

    Aug 21, 2017 at 10:47 am

    Looks great! Great shaft options also

  12. TheCityGame

    Aug 21, 2017 at 10:13 am

    “Golf’s Most Solid Investment”.

    You know what seems like a pretty solid investment. . .the Callaway Diablo Octane Tour. You can get one for about 50 bucks and go win on the PGA tour with it as your driver and your 3W.

    • Caroline

      Aug 21, 2017 at 4:13 pm

      If we all could just play what works for us a few years with being mind challenged by the club and ball manufactures….what is it about 80% will buy 3 yards off the tee no matter what the cost…but take a $65 (or more) lesson and gain 10 yards NEVER….

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Equipment

SPOTTED: A PXG “XXF prototype” driver in Charles Howell III’s bag

Published

on

In December, we spotted a PXG XXF driver, along with two other PXG drivers, on the USGA conforming clubs list. Flash forward to Monday at the 2018 CareerBuilder Challenge, we spotted an XXF prototype driver in person in the bag of PXG staffer and club-tinkerer Charles Howell III.

We are told the XXF driver in CHII’s bag is only a prototype, and that it may never actually be released to the public.

As we originally postulated, it seems from the layout of the weights, or screws, that the XXF prototype is a fade-biased driver; that’s because there are three screws out on the toe portion of the sole, but none on the heel portion. We also guessed that the PXG ZZ has a neutral bias and the PXG XX is a draw-biased driver.

The last official driver release from PXG was a line of 0811X drivers that introduced thermoplastic elastomer inserts into the soles of the drivers to help lower center of gravity — making the drivers more forgiving and spin less — and to dampen vibrations, enhancing sound and feel. Since we haven’t cut open the XXF prototype driver we spotted in CHIII’s bag, we don’t know whether it also has a TPE insert in the sole. But, if the material lowered CG in the 0811X drivers, it’s likely the material would make it’s way into the XXF prototype driver in some capacity to achieve similar results.

From the photos, CHIII is testing the XXF prototype driver with a Mitsubishi Tensei CK Blue shaft. We’ll keep an eye out to see whether he puts the driver into play this week, and we’ll update you with more information on the XXF driver if it becomes available.

Discussion: See what GolfWRX members are saying about the PXG XXF driver in our forums

Your Reaction?
  • 5
  • LEGIT2
  • WOW1
  • LOL0
  • IDHT0
  • FLOP0
  • OB0
  • SHANK6

Continue Reading

Equipment

Callaway launches new Rogue, Rogue Sub Zero and Rogue Draw drivers, and fairway woods

Published

on

With its Jailbreak technology, Callaway’s GBB Epic drivers were the No. 1-selling drivers in the United States in 2017; actually, according to Callaway, they were the No. 1-selling drivers every month in the U.S. in 2017.

How do you back that up? How do you replace a driver that’s been so successful?

Well, apparently you don’t.

Callaway’s new Rogue, Rogue Sub Zero and Rogue Draw drivers, as Callaway says, do not replace its GBB Epic and GBB Epic Sub Zero drivers of last year. Instead, Rogue is an all-new line that improves on the Epic technologies, but the company will continue to sell its Epic drivers.

Actually, if you follow Callaway’s trends over recent years, you may realize that the company should be coming out with an XR 18 line of drivers and fairway woods. That’s not the case, however. In this sense, Callaway is “going rogue.” Company representatives say that with the new Rogue drivers and fairway woods, the company is “doing what the industry is not expecting us to do.” This means that instead of coming out with an XR 18 driver at a price point of say $379, it is launching the Rogue drivers at $499.99 and packing them with improved-upon technologies than were in the Epic drivers, for more forgiveness and better aerodynamics. Callaway also says “the XR line is done for us.”

The original Jailbreak technology in the Epic drivers consisted of two titanium bars that sat behind the face; the idea is that the bars gave the structure more strength, or stiffened the crown and sole, to allow the faces to be made thinner, and therefore faster, without sacrificing durability. But with the Rogue drivers, Callaway wanted to save weight from these bars in order to displace the weight elsewhere (re: lower and more rearward in the head for more forgiveness). So Callaway’s engineers designed new hourglass-shaped Jailbreak bars, which are thinner in the middle portions of the titanium bars, and thicker near the crown and sole. This allowed the company to save 25 percent of the weight from the Jailbreak design without sacrificing the benefits of higher ball speeds across the face. You’ll notice from address (in the photo below) that the body looks a bit more stretched out than the Epic drivers; that’s to drive CG (center of gravity) more rearward to raise MOI (moment of inertia, a measure of forgiveness). The new hourglass design allowed that to be possible, as well getting rid of the weight-shifting track in the rear of the sole, as seen on the Epic drivers.

Callaway’s Rogue drivers, unlike the GBB Epic drivers, use the Boeing aero package — equipped with speed trips on the crown and an overall more aerodynamic shape — that the company introduced in the XR 16 drivers. The Rogue drivers also use a new X Face VFT technology that uses variable face thicknesses across the face to boost ball speeds on off-center strikes. The triaxial carbon crowns of the Rogue, which Callaway calls it’s largest carbon crowns ever, also save weight from the top of the club that is displaced lower in the heads to drive CG lower and more rearward.

The overall result is 0.6 mph more club head speed from the Rogue drivers compared to the GBB Epic, according to Callaway, and a 16 percent tighter dispersion.

There are three different models in the Rogue driver series: Callaway Rogue, Rogue Sub Zero and Rogue Draw. The relationship between the Rogue and Rogue Sub Zero is the same as it was between the GBB Epic and the GBB Epic Sub Zero, with the standard version having a larger profile and more shallow face, while the Sub Zero is a bit lower-spinning with a more compact look and a deeper face. The Rogue Sub Zero has two interchangeable weights (2 grams and 14 grams) that produces about 200 rpm of change between the two settings, according to Callaway.

The new Rogue Draw, with a 5-gram screw in the sole toward the heel, and with additional internal heel wighting, is for those golfers who want to fix their slice. The GBB Epic driver, with the 17-gram weight all the way in heel, hit the golf ball 11 yards left of center, according to Callaway’s testing. The Rogue Draw hits it 18 yards left of center. That means the Rogue Draw will draw the ball 7 yards farther than a GBB Epic set to draw.

The Rogue, Rogue Sub Zero and Rogue Draw drivers will be available at retail on February 9 for $499.99 each. Callaway Customs will also be available on each of the drivers in March. See below for more information on stock shafts, and keep reading for info on the fairway woods.

Discussion: See what GolfWRX Members are saying about the Rogue drivers and fairways in our forums

Callaway Rogue driver

Stock shafts for the standard Rogue range from 40-70 gram options, including Aldila’s Synergy and Quaranta shafts, and Project X’s EvenFlow and HZRDUS Yellow shafts.

Callaway Rogue Sub Zero driver

Stock shafts for the Rogue Sub Zero range from 50-70 gram options, including Aldila’s Synergy, Project X’s EvenFlow, and Project X’s HZRDUS Yellow.

Callaway Rogue Draw driver

The Rogue Draw is available in 9, 10.5 and 13 degree lofts. Stock shafts include the same offerings as the standard Rogue model, which include Aldila’s Synergy and Quaranta shafts, and Project X’s EvenFlow and HZRDUS Yellow shafts.

Callaway Rogue and Rogue Sub Zero fairway woods

Callaway’s Epic fairway woods did not have Jailbreak technology, but the Rogue fairways do. Also, unlike the hourglass-Jailbreak that’s in the Rogue drivers, the Rogue fairway woods do not have the hourglass shape, and they’re made from steel instead of titanium. According to Callaway, while it wanted to make the Jailbreak technology lighter in the drivers, it actually wanted to make it heavier in the fairways, thus they’re made from steel and do not have the weight-saving hourglass shape.

Jailbreak in the Rogue fairway woods combines with Callaway’s familiar Face Cup technology. The Rogue fairway woods faces are made from “ultra-thin” Carpenter 455 steel, and the Face Cup is designed to boost ball speeds on off-center hits. Additionally, the Rogue fairways use Callaway’s Internal Standing Wave to position CG low-and-forward for high launch and low spin, they use triaxial carbon crowns to save weight from the top portions of the club to also shift CG lower, and they use the Boeing aero package for more club head speed.

The Rogue Sub Zero fairway woods, which have more compact shapes and deeper faces, also have a 5-gram weight in the forward portion of their soles in order to driver CG even more forward. This design will help high-spin golfers lower spin for more distance.

The Rogue and Rogue Sub Zero fairway woods will sell for $299.99 each starting on February 9. See below for shaft details.

Callaway Rogue fairway wood

Callaway says the Rogue fairways (13.5, 15, 17, 19, 20, 21, 23 and 25 degrees) are available in multiple premium shafts and weights ranging from 40-80 grams.

Callaway Rogue Sub Zero fairway wood

Callaway says the Rogue Sub Zero fairways (13.5, 15 and 18 degrees) are available in multiple premium shaft brands ranging from 60-80 grams.

Discussion: See what GolfWRX Members are saying about the Rogue drivers and fairways in our forums

Your Reaction?
  • 67
  • LEGIT10
  • WOW7
  • LOL8
  • IDHT3
  • FLOP6
  • OB4
  • SHANK39

Continue Reading

Equipment

Ping’s new Glide 2.0 “Stealth” wedges, and Vault 2.0 putters

Published

on

Today, in addition to the G400 Max driver and the G700 irons, Ping also launched Glide 2.0 Stealth wedges, and the Vault 2.0 putters that we first spotted at the 2018 Sony Open in Hawaii. Each of the products are currently available for pre-order. See below for tech info, photos and more about the offerings.

Glide 2.0 Stealth wedges

Unlike the original Glide 2.0 wedges, which were made from 431 stainless steel, the Glide 2.0 Stealth wedges are made from 8620 carbon steel for a softer feel. More obviously, they have a different, darker finish that reduces glare and “makes the wedges seem smaller,” according to Ping. The finish is applied using something called a Quench Polish Quench process for greater durability.

The wedges also have a milled, wheel-cut “half-groove” near the leading edge of the higher-lofted wedges (56, 58 and 60 degrees) to increase spin on shots hit low on the face.

Like the Glide 2.0 wedges, the Stealth versions also have progressive groove designs, which means the grooves in the lower-lofted wedges (46, 50 and 52 degrees) have a larger edge radius than the higher-lofted wedges. Therefore, the lower-lofted wedges will perform a bit more like irons, while the higher-lofted wedges will have additional spin for more control around the greens.

The Stealth wedges come in 17 loft-grind combinations, as listed below:

  • SS Grind (46-12, 50-12, 52-12, 54-12, 56-12, 58-10 and 60-10)
  • WS Grind (54-14, 56-14, 58-14 and 60-14)
  • TS Grind (58-06 and 60-06)
  • ES Grind (54-08, 56-08, 58-08 and 60-08)

They come stock with either Ping’s AWT 2.0 steel shaft ($150) or Ping’s CFS graphite shaft ($175). Additional shafts are also available at no upcharge.

Click here for discussion and more photos of the wedges

Vault 2.0 putters

Ping’s new Vault 2.0 putters have a greater focus than ever on fitting. Using a new custom-weighting system, the putters are available with either steel sole plates, tungsten sole plates that are 15-grams heavier than steel, or aluminum sole plates that are 15 grams lighter than steel. Putters between 34 and 36 inches use steel, putters 36 and longer use aluminum, and putters 34 inches and shorter use tungsten. This allows golfers to have a putter with the correct feel and balance no matter the length.

The 100-percent-milled putters also use Ping’s True Roll technology in their faces, evident by the pattern of cross-hatched grooves that are varied in depth across the face to increase speed on off-center hits. The goal with this face design is to get the speed the golfer needs on longer putts, even if the contact is on the heel or toe.

Five of the putter models (aside from the Ketsch) are made from 303 stainless steel and are available in three finishes: Stealth, Platinum and Copper. The Ketsch mallet is available in two finishes, Stealth or Slate, and combines a 6061 Aluminum body with a stainless steel sole plate. Grip options for the putters include the PP60 (a midsize design with foam under-listing), the PP61 (an “exaggerated pistol” with a rubber under-listing), the PP62 (over-sized with a rounded profile) or the CB60 (the standard counterbalanced grip).

Get the specs for each of the new Vault 2.0 putters below, which sell for $325 apiece.

Vault 2.0 Dale Anser

The new Dale Anser is “inspired by one of the original Anser putter molds created by Allan Dale Solheim and detailed by his father, Karsten Solheim,” according to Ping.

  • Weight: 350 grams
  • Toe Hang: Slight Arc
  • Standard length: 35 inches
  • Loft: 3 degrees
  • Lie Angle: Adjustable +/- 4 degrees

See more photos here.

Vault 2.0 Voss

  • Weight: 350 grams
  • Finish: Available in Stealth finish (Copper or Platinum available on special order)
  • Toe Hang: Slight Arc
  • Length: 35 inches
  • Loft: 3 degree
  • Lie Angle: Adjustable +/- 4 degrees

See more photos here.

Vault 2.0 B60

  • Weight: 355 grams
  • Finish: Available in Stealth or Copper finish (Platinum available special order)
  • Toe Hang: Slight Arc
  • Length: 35 inches
  • Loft: 3 degrees
  • Lie Angle: Adjustable +/- 4 degrees

See more photos here.

Vault 2.0 ZB

  • Weight: 350 grams
  • Finish: Available in Platinum (Copper or Stealth available special order)
  • Toe Hang: Slight Arc
  • Length: 35 inches
  • Loft: 3 degrees
  • Lie Angle: Adjustable +/- 4 degrees

See more photos here.

Vault 2.0 Piper (Mid-Mallet)

  • Weight: 360 grams
  • Finish: Available in Stealth finish (Copper or Platinum available special order)
  • Toe Hang: Slight Arc or Straight
  • Length: 35 inches
  • Loft: 3 degrees
  • Lie Angle: Adjustable +/- 2 degrees

See more photos here.

Vault 2.0 Ketsch (Mallet)

  • Weight: 365 grams
  • Finish: Available in Stealth finish (Slate finish available special order)
  • Toe Hang: Slight Arc or Straight
  • Length: 35 inches
  • Loft: 3 degrees
  • Lie Angle: Adjustable +/- 2 degrees

Click here for discussion and more photos of the putters.

Your Reaction?
  • 27
  • LEGIT2
  • WOW0
  • LOL1
  • IDHT0
  • FLOP0
  • OB0
  • SHANK2

Continue Reading

19th Hole

Facebook

Trending