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Exotics new CBX Fairway Woods, a “Spin Killer”

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For golfers seeking a low-spinning, long-hitting fairway wood, there is officially a new product on the market to consider. While it may seem that every manufacturer claims to have to longest fairway wood on the market, an independent Iron Byron test showed the new Exotics CBX fairway woods to be the lowest-spinning and longest — by 16 yards — when compared to three of the most popular fairway woods today.

Self-labeled “Golf’s Most Solid Investment,” Tour Edge takes advantage of experienced designers and smaller production runs to create quality products. Its products sell under the brands of Exotics, Bazooka, and Hot Launch. The CBX line is the company’s most recent creation.

Exotics_CBX_Fairway_Wood_Address

We first spotted the CBX fairway woods at the WGC-Bridgestone Invitational.

The CBX boasts a plethora of design improvements to help maximize performance. To achieve absolutely precise weighting, a super-thin beta titanium cup face is combo-brazed to the hyper steel body of the head. The club face also has variable face thickness, which helps preserve distance on off-center strikes.

The most notable aspect of the club is the center of gravity location. A carbon sole unit helps move the CG forward, and the unique shape (longer toe-to-heel and shorter front-to-back) positions the CG in the optimal location to maximize distance. The club was playfully nicknamed the “spin killer” in production at Tour Edge.

Exotics_CBX_Club_Face_Fairway_Woods

Finally, the Speed Ramp Sole helps maintain speed and contact through impact and turf interaction. This sole was based off the extremely popular Slipstream “Waves” Soles on previous Exotics fairway wood models. The club looks simple at address, with a sleek, all-black crown and no alignment aids.

The CBX fairway woods ($349.99 each) will be in stores Sept. 5 in lofts of 13.5, 15, 16.5, and 18. Premium shaft options include the HZRDUS line by Project X, Aldila Rogue Silver and Black, Exotics Fujikura Pro, Mitsubishi Rayon Kuro Kage Silver Dual Core, Mitsubishi Rayon Diamana, and Mitsubishi Rayon Tensei CK Blue Series.

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Malcolm is an incoming freshman at Tufts University, and he recently graduated from Boston College High School in Massachusetts. He plans on playing on the golf team at Tufts and has a 2.5 index. He plays out of The Country Club in Brookline.

25 Comments

25 Comments

  1. Shawn

    Sep 12, 2017 at 12:10 pm

    Still gaming my MP Titanium 3 and 5 woods…Best feeling clubs I’ve ever hit.

  2. Chuck

    Sep 11, 2017 at 6:26 pm

    What is so curious to me about the CBX line is that it is introduced just a few months after the EX10 Beta, right? And by “a few months,” I mean only about six or seven months, right? Even Taylormade never rotated a line that quickly.

    Is there an explanation for this? Maybe there is something I am not getting, and if so I’d sure like to know about it. Is it possible that they came up with such a good design in the CBX they decided they couldn’t wait to get it out?

    I have hit a lot of really nice TEE fairways. I really want to try the CBX.

  3. Philip

    Aug 22, 2017 at 2:18 pm

    Do you know what the definition of “plethora” actually is? Regardless, nothing mentioned in the article related to this club is actually anything new, let alone ground-breaking. Besides, testing results can be so slanted before they even start … so it is 16 yards longer than the current competition, yet one of those was 10-16 yards longer than all the others, of which some in that group where 10-20 yards longer than all of the competition … yet no one on the golf is realizing all this amazing yardage for the most part. Heck, I can take an XXX stiff shaft 48 inches long and have the prized iron byron pound the ball out there … where is the context of these 16 yards, what was the clubhead speed, was iron byron coming OTT … if not for most the results are useless.

  4. elgordo

    Aug 22, 2017 at 11:48 am

    Looks a lot like the CB4 from several years ago. Prob spins a little less. You can get a CB4 on ebay for $50.

  5. Steve

    Aug 22, 2017 at 4:34 am

    The best thing about golf, buying new equipment and making the tee time….playing it is a distant third.

  6. Wizardofflatstickmountain

    Aug 21, 2017 at 9:33 pm

    The newest club I have is a Callaway mini driver I bought used.

    Driver: ping i25 driver bought in the plastic for $100.

    Irons: ping i20 custom fit for a song.

    Putter: ping wolverine $85.

    Woods: Callaway steelhead plus w/ Aldila NV shafts. Heads were $20 on eBay. Shafts were $45.

    The only ‘extravagance’ in my bag is a Bettinardi wedge I got for $80 at a show.

    I’m a 10 and I don’t practice.

    I’d much rather see a guy with all brand new everything across the tee box than someone w the rogues gallery I’ve got.

    • elgordo

      Aug 22, 2017 at 11:46 am

      Love this post. I hear so many people say golf is too expensive. It isn’t if you just look around a bit. IMO clubs really haven’t changed that much. And they certainly don’t change much from year to year.

    • Travis

      Aug 22, 2017 at 3:10 pm

      I buy clubs way too often and I’m a +4. I could easily stomp you with my “brand new clubs”. Shouldn’t make generalizations.

      • Wizardofflatstickmountain

        Aug 23, 2017 at 11:05 am

        If you quit telling people you’re a +4, you’d probably win more matches.

  7. DukeOH

    Aug 21, 2017 at 7:28 pm

    I love TEE’s CB line of fairways. Compact head (<160cc), Ti face, nice stock shafts.

    I know that their continued use of Titanium keeps their costs high, but if they want to charge $350, at least hire someone that's not blind from naked eye eclipse viewing to design better looking sole graphics. The worst!

  8. JustinR

    Aug 21, 2017 at 5:27 pm

    The OEM business model for golf equipment has drastically changed because golf participation is plummeting, particularly among the middle classes who can’t afford the game any more.
    The club market has shifted to the upper classes who don’t care about the cost and can buy whatever they desire. They can afford to buy the newest and most improved clubs.
    Of course one may wonder if the rich have more money than brains when it comes to golf equipment, and they are the new gearhead class. Those on the forum who decry the insanity have had enough and probably cannot justify the newest club models and reject the disingenuous promises that never stop.

  9. JOHN JAROSKY

    Aug 21, 2017 at 1:03 pm

    When is a company going to be created that makes really quality goods and will undercut these escalating prices from these major manufactures? Lets band together guys and girls and stop the madness. I can see the companies who shell out millions for advertising and huge player contracts charging what they do but would love to see a company come into the market that makes a great product at a fair price without all the other outside expenses the larger companies have that’s passed on to the consumer.

    • Simms

      Aug 21, 2017 at 2:57 pm

      It has been tried and has failed to many times, when a little guy trys something the big boys come in buy them out (if lucky) or put a law suit on them (they could win or not) that will drag on taking out every penny they have to fight….right now I think everyone should be looking at the Costco /Titlest battle…how long before Costco just pulls out on this one….remember when Callaway bought Top Flight the battle they had with Titlest over pattern infringement, that case was on books for a long time before settling out of court.

      • Tcann32

        Aug 22, 2017 at 8:50 am

        You’re right about most of it.
        When people talk about the Titleist / Costco deal, everyone seems to think that Titleist (Acushnet) is some mega giant company. They are huge in golf, but Costco is actually a much larger “company” than Acushnet as a whole, let alone Titleist itself. Costco’s yearly net profits match that of Acushnets net sales.

        The other part that isn’t mentioned is that these larger companies are losing money, and if they aren’t losing money, they aren’t really growing by much, outside of a couple of the companies. Titleist hasn’t grown and is losing more market share and TM is going down the path of Adams, the company they purchased to avoid patent infringements.

        The rest of it is dead on. Miura has been purchased, Toulon was purchased by Callaway (Although they Toulon is still his own entity), and the rest of the botique brands don’t generate enough interest to be bought, besides maybe one particular brand who’s owner has the capital to do whatever he really wants.

    • Steve

      Aug 21, 2017 at 3:23 pm

      Cheers! to that……….wait a year they will be 75 bucks…..

      • Caroline

        Aug 21, 2017 at 4:33 pm

        But the club companies are going to put a spin on how last years model is obsolete and you are going to feel like your still not playing the best….for fun find a couple golf digests or golf magazines from 7 or 8 years ago and read the club and ball ads…it will have you wanting those clubs and balls until you re-check the date of the magazine.

        • LF-Colton

          Aug 30, 2017 at 5:14 pm

          Golf is one of the sports where its okay to be a year or two behind the newest model. I think you’re onto something here with your last sentence. Don’t buy into the hype too much and just buy for your price range.

    • TheCityGame

      Aug 22, 2017 at 8:58 am

      They all already make quality goods. I’m playing equipment from 2009. It’s YOUR FAULT if you get suckered into the marketing every cycle.

    • Heich

      Aug 22, 2017 at 11:35 am

      Yeah. Bring down the Government, John. That would be the start.

  10. Geoff

    Aug 21, 2017 at 12:28 pm

    Love TEE, but I don’t know how they stay in business. Wait a year and these will be $120 brand new on ebay.

    • Simms

      Aug 21, 2017 at 2:59 pm

      Agree, you can barley get the tags off the shaft and they have a new and better model out there.

    • Boyo

      Aug 27, 2018 at 5:54 am

      It has been a year and they are still holding their value. Let me know when you find a brand new one for $120 anywhere.

  11. Doug A

    Aug 21, 2017 at 10:47 am

    Looks great! Great shaft options also

  12. TheCityGame

    Aug 21, 2017 at 10:13 am

    “Golf’s Most Solid Investment”.

    You know what seems like a pretty solid investment. . .the Callaway Diablo Octane Tour. You can get one for about 50 bucks and go win on the PGA tour with it as your driver and your 3W.

    • Caroline

      Aug 21, 2017 at 4:13 pm

      If we all could just play what works for us a few years with being mind challenged by the club and ball manufactures….what is it about 80% will buy 3 yards off the tee no matter what the cost…but take a $65 (or more) lesson and gain 10 yards NEVER….

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Equipment

WRX Insider: Top 5 equipment stories at the PGA Championship

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This week at Harding Park had a few key stories to track from a WITB standpoint. Some were huge, some were subtle. All are interesting.

Here are the top five equipment stories from the PGA Championship.

#5. Fleetwood goes to Ventus

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA – AUGUST 07: Tommy Fleetwood of England plays his shot from the 14th tee during the second round of the 2020 PGA Championship at TPC Harding Park on August 07, 2020 in San Francisco, California. (Photo by Ezra Shaw/Getty Images)

Tommy Fleetwood has one of the most eclectic bags on Tour. The Englishman is the epitome of finding the right 14 sticks no matter what. This week at Harding Park, he made what I would call a pretty substantial change to his driver set up. Being a player that has trusted the Mitsubishi Kuro Kage XTS 70 TX for a while now, Tommy not only switched shafts but switched companies going into the ever-popular Fujikura Ventus Black 7 X.

According to my source, Tommy was fighting a left miss with the normal setup and was searching for a way to stabilize the head a bit. The Ventus not only helped that but also kicked up the ball speed a touch. Obviously it helped, at the time this article was written he was two back of the leaders having put on a ballstriking display with a Friday 64.

#4. Fleetwood swaps in TM Proto 4 and 5-irons

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA – AUGUST 07: Tommy Fleetwood of England plays a shot on the tenth hole during the second round of the 2020 PGA Championship at TPC Harding Park on August 07, 2020 in San Francisco, California. (Photo by Ezra Shaw/Getty Images)

Tommy also swapped out his Srixon Z765 4 and 5-irons for two TaylorMade prototypes. The switch was in an effort to bridge the gap between his 5-wood and 4-iron. In past weeks, he had tested a TaylorMade SIM Max 4 Rescue. The switch required him to strengthen his 5-iron to gap properly, but ultimately that recipe wasn’t the right fit.

#3. Koepka goes back to his M5

If anything has been holding Brooks Koepka back this year, it has been his driver. Notoriously an intimidating player off the tee (especially on tough golf courses), Koepka had been struggling in 2020.

He started the season with SIM Max and quickly swapped that for the Callaway Mavrik he used up until early this week. According to my source, BK liked the ball speed and feel from the Callaway but felt going back to the M5 he used in 2019 put him back in a comfortable pocket, and as you can see, he is right at the top of the leaderboard again.

Another interesting nugget is the M5 switch required no tweaks, straight into the bag. When no wrenching is needed, you know that club is dialed.

Koepka has also gone back to his trusty Nike Vapor Pro 3-iron. Previously, BK had the TaylorMade P790 UDI in play, but this return comes as no surprise—that particular club draws strong affections from certain players, namely Koepka and Tony Finau.

#2. DJ lands on a 7-wood

Height, spin, and gapping have become a huge theme in the past weeks—especially in that no man’s land between 3-wood and 5-iron. Dustin Johnson is a player who is not afraid to experiment, and he has checked off every possible box.

At any given point this year he has had a 3-iron, 4-hybrid, utility, and now a 7-wood. Although these changes will be course-specific, the trend I’m seeing is players are looking for spin and versatility wherever they can find it. Most clubs in that range tend to be low spin, so if there is a way to find 400-500 RPMs flying out of the same window, its a bonus.

#1. Tiger ditches the “Elder Wand” (it won’t last)

At this point, I think the story even made it to CNN. When Tiger switches anything its world news, especially his trusty Scotty Cameron. In this case, he moved into a Scotty Cameron “Timeless Prototype,” which is a lead into the 2020 Studio Select collection at retail.

Two things going on here

  1. Ability to manipulate head weight to match up with green speed. Tiger’s gamer is, by today’s standards light at 327 grams. This experiment allows him to add subtract weight out of the head via weight ports in the sole.
  2. Added length to take the pressure off his back. Not the first time a player has done this. Freddy Couples, Rocco Mediate, and many others have gone to longer putters to encourage more upright posture.

At posting time, Tiger putted it all over the place on Friday, so although this switch is newsworthy, it won’t last. He’s just putting the Elder Wand in the reflection chair as I do with my kids.

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Whats in the Bag

Jason Day WITB 2020 (August)

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  • Equipment accurate as of the PGA Championship.

Driver: TaylorMade SIM Max (10.5 degrees)
Shaft: Mitsubishi Kuro Kage XTS 70 X

3-wood: TaylorMade SIM Max (15.0 degrees)
Shaft: Mitsubishi Chemical Kuro Kage XTS 80 X

5-wood: TaylorMade SIM Max (18.0 degrees)
Shaft: Mitsubishi Chemical Kuro Kage XTS 80 X

Irons: TaylorMade P760 (4-PW)
Shafts: True Temper Dynamic Gold X Seven

Wedges: TaylorMade MG2 Satin (50-09SB, 54-11SB, 60-10SB)
Shafts: True Temper Dynamic Gold Tour Issue S400

Putter: Taylor Made Itsy Bitsy Spider Limited Red

Ball: TaylorMade TP5

Grips: Golf Pride Tour Velvet

More photos of Jason Day’s WITB in the forums.

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Whats in the Bag

Paul Casey WITB 2020 (August)

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  • Equipment accurate as of the PGA Championship.

Driver: TaylorMade SIM Max (10.5 degrees)
Shaft: Mitsubishi Tensei AV Raw Orange 75 TX

3-wood: TaylorMade M3 (15 degrees)
Shaft: Mitsubishi Diamana D+ Limited 80 TX

Irons: Mizuno JPX 919 Hot Metal Pro (3, 4), Mizuno MP-5 (5-PW)
Shafts: Nippon N.S. Pro Modus 3 120 TX

Wedges: Titleist Vokey Design SM7 (52-08F, 56-10S), Vokey Proto 60-T (60T)
Shafts: Shafts: Nippon N.S. Pro Modus 3 120 TX

(Pics c/o Titleist’s Aaron Dill)

Putter: Scotty Cameron Special Select Fastback

Grips: Golf Pride ZGrip Cord

Ball: Titleist Pro V1

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