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19th Hole

Golfer shoots 135 in Monday PGA Tour qualifier

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There is a fine line between success and failure in this game.

A lip-out that might cost a place on the weekend, a poor lie in a bunker, or an approach that lands pin high but takes too much spin and runs back off the green – just some visuals that golfers see weekly on the course and on television. However, you can’t do much when it’s just not your day at all, or when you are simply devoid of talent.

Last Thursday, the doyen of the Q-school world Ryan French tweeted a photo of a scorecard that ‘multiple people’ had sent to him, with the headline:

“This guy almost pulled off the impossible 3-4-5-6-7-8-9-10-11-12-13 straight (he’s missing just the 11). At the Valero Pre-Q. 135. ONE-HUNDERED THIRTY-FIVE.”

With a front-nine 65 bettering his back-nine by five shots to total 135 for his 18 holes, the as yet unnamed player was 67 shots away from the minimum qualifying mark, and 71 away from the actual lead.

As always, this type of post received plenty of activity on social media.

Some, like @HefnerGolf, suggested they ‘need a plus 10 rule. Once you reach 10 over, you leave the course,’ whilst Anthony The Prof was amazed he actually finished:

”The fact he went to 10th tee rather than parking lot from the 9th green… dedication? Insanity? Masochism? A bit of all 3?”

Tweeter @JGawdept came in with some wry golfer wit:

“Man, I just couldn’t make a putt out there. He’ll shoot 72 in his Saturday men’s game though,” and Elpulpo joined in the laughs with a bit of topical fun:

“He should have schefllered on 18 green to make 11.”

I guess if the number one player in the world can four-putt from no distance, then why not the undisclosed hacker?

To answer the ‘many sickos’ that scour ‘the bottom of Pre-Q leaderboards’ and those that asked how someone like that gets in to such an event, Monday Q Info posted some info on the ‘basics, the nerdy and the super nerdy of Monday Q’s.’

As he often calls it, it’s the grind.

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  1. Pingback: Golfer plays US Open qualifier as punishment for losing fantasy football bet…and it went badly – GolfWRX

  2. Michael

    Apr 20, 2022 at 3:52 pm

    Kind of lets our head pro off the off the hook. I showed him the article below and he laughed quite a bit.

    golfdigest “dot” com/story/webcom-tour-pro-makes-a-17-on-a-par-4-at-the-lecom-suncoast-classic

  3. Pingback: Always Sunny in Philadelphia’s Charlie Day has a ‘Rainman-like’ golf talent – GolfWRX

  4. Pingback: Aussie golfer fires round of 15-under for a stunning 57 – GolfWRX

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19th Hole

Golfer plays US Open qualifier as punishment for losing fantasy football bet…and it went badly

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‘Monday Q Info’ is a name that is renowned for bringing us the serious side of the game, the player that grinds through a round before hopping off to work at a store, golfers sleeping side-by-side in camper vans, and even suffering personal tragedy.

He also thankfully brings us the amusing side of the sport and did so again yesterday when highlighting the plight of one competitor at the US Open qualifier at Oakwood Country Club, Kansas City, Missouri.

According to a report that was given to Twitter golf legend, Ryan French (posting as @acaseofthegolf1) John Eckert signed for a 40-over score of 112 for the standard par-72, a card that included one 10 and five double-bagels…snowmen. Whatever you want to call it, they were eights!

Replies ask how Eckert got in to the competition given there is supposed to be a max handicap index of 1.4, and whilst Ryan hinted, “This may come as a surprise to some but the handicap system in golf can be manipulated,” a few respondents put up the thought that he registered as a pro, therefore not needing to declare any figures.

Either way, the verdict seems mixed.

“It sucks to be the playing partner having to watch him hit multiple shots in between your shots. Ruins the flow and it’s incredibly tough to keep focused,” was one comment, whilst another poster made his point: “Dying over the discourse in this thread from golfers. Giant babies.”

Either way, what was the reason he played in the first place?

According to those that were unfortunate enough to be playing alongside, Eckert ‘lost a fantasy football bet and his punishment was to play.’

We can’t be sure who was punished more in the end – his playing partners or the man himself.

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19th Hole

PGA Chief worried about potential Phil Mickelson ‘circus’ at Southern Hills

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Not that long ago, the prospect of old rivals and golfing legends Tiger Woods and Phil Mickelson appearing at Southern Hills 2022 was a dream scenario.

With just eight days to go till the first tee-off, those dreams are turning into a bit of a nightmare for the CEO of PGA of America, Seth Waugh, who hopes to resolve any troublesome questions that are bound to be hurled at Mickelson, the defending champion.

Two weeks ago, Mickelson’s agents, SportFive, released a statement that concluded, “Phil currently has no concrete plans on when and where he will play. Any actions taken are in no way a reflection of a final decision made, but rather to keep all options open.”

As it increasingly looks as if the 51-year-old will at least turn up intending to play, the organisers are determined that the event isn’t compromised with what is sure to be heightened attention on one player in particular.

The last few months have not been kind to Phil.

As we reported yesterday, just days before the start of the second major of the season, Alan Shipnuck will release his unauthorized biography of Mickelson, something that is sure to add more fuel to the ever-increasing pressure on the six-time major champion.

Whether forced or self-motivated, Mickelson has been in exile since February after some controversial comments about the PGA Tour and the new Saudi Golf League. Having accused the PGA Tour of “obnoxious greed”, he then stated the reason he was supporting the Greg Norman run series of events was “because this is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to reshape how the PGA Tour operates.” All this despite admitting he knows plenty of the Saudi “horrible record on human rights”.

Waugh admitted yesterday that should Mickelson play, he would want the fuss over before play begins.

“I hope what we can do is have that (the press conference) before the flag goes up,” Waugh said on Gary Williams’ Five Clubs podcast.

“The idea is, if he does play, and if he’s able to and allowed to… he would certainly have to face the media. But I hope it’s Monday or Tuesday…What we’re trying to do is deliver a major championship, not a circus.”

For once, an appearance by Tiger Woods at a major championship may not steal the headlines.

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19th Hole

Pro loses tournament after extremely rare penalty

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As we’ve seen quite often in professional golf lately, there’s been another strange rule being applied to a golfer in contention.

During Sunday’s final round of the GS Caltex Maekyung Open, Mingyu Cho played his third shot on the 9th hole at Namseoul Country Club in Korea while standing on the hole’s second green.

According to Rule 13.1f, “relief must be taken from wrong green.” The full rule states:

“Interference under this Rule exists when your ball is on a wrong green or a wrong green physically interferes with your area of intended stance or area of intended swing. When there is interference by a wrong green, you must not play the ball as it lies. Instead, you must take free relief by dropping the original ball or another ball in the relief area as shown in Diagram 13.1f. There is no relief under this Rule if interference exists only because you choose a club, type of stance or swing or direction of play that is clearly unreasonable under the circumstances.”

Due to the infraction, Cho was docked two strokes. Unfortunately, he finished two strokes behind the eventual winner Bio Kim.

While it’s rare, this rules infraction was called once before on the PGA Tour. In 2017 at the Barclays, Seung-Yul Noh played a shot on the 11th hole from the 3rd green and was issued a two stroke penalty.

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