Connect with us

Equipment

Classic Name, Max Performance: TaylorMade launches 2017 “M CGB” irons

Published

on

TaylorMade is holding nothing back in terms of distance and forgiveness with its premium M CGB irons, which revive a name and concept from the company’s past.

In 2006, TaylorMade released super game-improvement irons with a high COR (coefficient of restitution, a measure of energy transfer) that sold for around $1,300 at retail. They were called r7 CGB, or “Center of Gravity Back.” These irons stood alone at the high-end of the market in terms of performance and pricing, after which the iron industry began shifting toward higher-COR irons, according to Tomo Bystedt, Senior Director of Product Creation (Irons) at TaylorMade. Even standard game-improvement irons were being built with high COR, like the company’s Burner 2009 irons, which sold for half the price. The demand for max performance at a premium price dissipated.

“The CGB name is iconic and represents some of the longest and most forgiving irons we’ve ever created at TaylorMade,” Bystedt said in a press release. “The concept has now been re-created with all our latest technology to bring never-before-seen performance to golfers of all skill levels.”

Flash forward to 2017, however, and that demand is back. The problem today is, according to Bystedt, is that super game-improvement irons that offer big distance, a high launch and maximum forgiveness are all delivered in iron heads that he said are too big, waving a red flag to a foursome.

“Super G.I. irons have always been huge,” Bystedt told me. “It signals to people that you’re not that good.”

TaylorMade's 2006 r7 CGB (left) vs. its 2017 M CGB

TaylorMade’s 2006 r7 CGB (left) vs. its 2017 M CGB

With its new M CGB irons, TaylorMade sought to provide golfers with a high-end product that provides the performance of a super game-improvement iron, but doesn’t look like it’s the size of a woodshed. Bystedt and his product development team also wanted to offer better sound and feel than super-GI golfers are used to.

That being the case, TaylorMade packed the M CGB irons with technologies from the company’s past, and a few new features as well, to make them the most forgiving and longest irons in the company’s stable.

Like the M2 irons, the M CGB irons have a fluted hosel to help displace center of gravity

Like the M2 irons, the M CGB irons have a fluted hosel to help displace CG.

Each M CGB iron in the set has four metal-injection-molded tungsten weights that sit deep behind the face to increase MOI (moment of inertia, a measure of forgiveness) and move center of gravity (CG) rearward to increase launch and forgiveness. The irons also use TaylorMade’s Inverted Cone design and a newly designed “Speed Pocket” to help golfers create faster, more consistent ball speeds. The irons also use an “accordion-style” undercut to create more distance, along with the company’s “Face Slots” that help expand the sweet spot of the irons. For better sound and feel, the M CGB irons use the company’s familiar “Geocoustic” technology, which includes a special geometry and a material called Hybrar in the badging of the irons to dampen vibrations for a better sound and feel.

TaylorMade's "Accordion" undercut for higher launch

TaylorMade’s “Accordion” undercut helps create a higher launch.

Each of the irons were given maximum COR, according to Bystedt, so there’s no progression or “holding back” on distance or forgiveness throughout the set. With TaylorMade’s M2 2017 irons, which are currently the company’s most forgiving iron model, the mid and short irons were not given maximum COR to help golfers create more consistent distance gaps throughout the set. The M CGB irons were to create the highest ball flight possible through the set. The result, according to TaylorMade, is an iron that achieves the highest peak height of any TaylorMade iron since 2012, which will certainly benefit golfers with slower swing speeds who need help to hit the ball higher and farther so they can hit more greens.

Since these irons launch higher and are created for golfers who swing the club a bit slower, their loft progression looks a bit different compared to TaylorMade’s M2 irons. The longer irons have higher lofts than the long irons of the M2 set (1.5 degrees higher in the 4 iron), and the shorter irons and wedges (9-PW, AW, SW) have stronger lofts. According to Bystedt, this differentiation in loft progression helps golfers with slower swing speeds hit ideal launch windows to create max performance.

The M CGB irons will be available on September 29 (4-PW and AW or SW) for $1,199.99 for an eight-piece set with a Nippon N.S. Pro 840 steel shafts. The cost is $1,399.99 with the stock graphite shaft option, UST’s Recoil 460 ES. The irons come stock with a TaylorMade Dual Feel grip. Custom shaft and grip options will be available, many at no added charge.

Your Reaction?
  • 142
  • LEGIT14
  • WOW8
  • LOL14
  • IDHT4
  • FLOP11
  • OB6
  • SHANK138

We share your golf passion. You can follow GolfWRX on Twitter @GolfWRX, Facebook and Instagram.

24 Comments

24 Comments

  1. George

    Sep 12, 2017 at 10:20 am

    Gentlemen I purchased new & still play the 2006 R7 CGB irons, graphite, 12 h-cap & 69 years old. The new M CGBs look similar, I cannot wait to test them out, maybe it’s time for a new shiny set after 11 years.

    • steve2

      Jan 4, 2018 at 1:15 am

      Yes, they are the Viagra of golf clubs 😎

  2. Otis

    Sep 11, 2017 at 6:06 pm

    I really love the TM cosmetic plaques on the back of the clubs. They give you that powerful blingy stature which is so important in golf.

  3. dcorun

    Sep 9, 2017 at 2:19 pm

    I don’t care about playing irons that make people think I’m bad. I played the old Cleveland HiBore irons and hit it past the ones playing their pretty clubs. I’m going to get fitted for the new Cleveland Launcher HB irons and start hitting it long again. They will cost around $800 with a real deal Miyazaki C Kua shaft and I’ll keep the change to play more golf.

  4. ob&chipolte&rnoobs

    Sep 8, 2017 at 2:57 pm

    I know, it’s crazy to think that people who like golf clubs would visit a site that mainly talks about new equipment.
    Chipolte it seems foolish to visit a site that talks about what you don’t like.
    Perhaps you could find a site more to your liking. Try Ilovebarbiedolls.com that should be more up your alley.

    • OBnoob

      Sep 9, 2017 at 6:31 pm

      yes, this is a ‘safe space’ for gearheads to slobber all over the latest and greatest new equipment and fantasize with ignorant opinions like ‘love’ and ‘feel’.

  5. Chipolte

    Sep 8, 2017 at 11:52 am

    SGI clubs for hackers, duffers and assorted gearhead teens and struggling seniors.

  6. rgk5

    Sep 8, 2017 at 7:00 am

    This looks like the end for the M2 and M1 irons. Why have three that are very close to the same?

    • Steve S

      Sep 8, 2017 at 8:10 am

      Not sure that will happen. The price points for the M series is a lot lower. These irons are targeted to the golfer who has more money than brains…which seems to be a growing demographic. Full disclosure, I play 2016 M2’s.

      • OBnoob

        Sep 9, 2017 at 6:29 pm

        “… the golfer who has more money than brains…”, but that covers all the gearheads on this fine forum!

  7. skull

    Sep 7, 2017 at 10:57 pm

    Nope, not at that price

  8. David

    Sep 7, 2017 at 7:44 pm

    ok I like these!! but side by side I would like to see how much they DON’T outperform the 2006 model!! guarantee they don’t by much if at all.

    also why is the graphite shaft cheaper than that spinner Nippon?? way cheaper. they never happens. has ust just sold itself out to every iron set for dirt cheap?

    They don’t make ping’s shafts anymore so they must have to do something for the average golfer??

    IDK man!! but ill take that m cgb 2 iron with a c taper 130x pronto. new beat stick.

    Also, soon we will see rossa cgb putters!!!!!!!!!! and those were always a good look.

    thumbs up

  9. Matt Hardy

    Sep 7, 2017 at 5:13 pm

    Delete

  10. Ns

    Sep 7, 2017 at 11:29 am

    These are going to be the shiznit

  11. Steve

    Sep 7, 2017 at 10:44 am

    JPX 900 Hot Metal with Recoil Shaft (or any shaft they offer) are the BEST GI clubs I’ve ever hit hands down. They are by far the longest, hottest, best feeling iron I’ve ever hit. Head to Head nothing beat it, not Apex, not the p series from TM, not the PING, and definitely not the new AP1 or AP3’s. It was also more forgiving and much better looking than any SGI club I’ve ever hit….. I also paid only $899 for 4-GW with REA, taper tip, Recoil shafts – not a ‘made for TM parallel tip cheap version’.

    Now TM wants to compete with the JPX 900 Hot Metal by charging consumers $1200 for the blatant garbage fire of a head above?! Oh and also charge an extra $200 for a made for TM Recoil bs shaft?!

    Good Luck TM, your decision making skills are impeccable….
    – that was sarcasm by the way.

    I guess that’s why I’ve seen more Mizuno sticks being used this year than I ever have before, while seeing less and less TM sticks at my club. Mizuno is back and growing fast. TM continues to spend outrageously in marketing, hoping consumers are dumb enough to listen.

    I strongly URGE consumers to try the JPX 900 HM or JPX 900 Forged instead. Stop falling victim to over amplified marketing.

    – Steve OUT (Mic-drop)

    • OB

      Sep 7, 2017 at 11:40 am

      YES YES YES!!!! I’m going out this evening to buy these new club contraptions with all the undercuts filled with elastomer and embedded with fantastic hi-density tungsten plugs…. not to mention the cool bling graphics. I want that soft buttery feel that I lost with my old clubs.
      I will retire my old Hogan Radials with the big bottom flange that lowers the club CG but it has little MOI to correct for my really bad toe and heel hits. I need drastic help for my awful off-center hits and these new club designs should really really help… I hope.

      • OBnoob

        Sep 7, 2017 at 5:09 pm

        What a fool. Sarcasm is not your forte. By the way it is certain some new technology will benefit your game. Those ratty old Hogans you hit are beater sticks for people that can’t play.

        • Chipolte

          Sep 8, 2017 at 11:50 am

          Gearheads slobbering over golf clubs are fools.

          • OBnoob

            Sep 9, 2017 at 6:27 pm

            I agree gearheads are fools, but that’s no reason to insult them with sarcasm about new technology. Newer is always better.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Equipment

Club Junkie Review: Srixon ZX7 Mk II and ZX5 Mk II irons

Published

on

Srixon’s ZX7 and ZX5 irons were some of the most well loved and talked about irons over the past two years. When replacing an iron with that kind of resume, the first rule is to not screw it up! For a more detailed review, please take a listen to the Club Junkie below or on any podcast platform. Just search GolfWRX Radio.

When I first put my hands on the ZX7 Mk II and ZX5 Mk II irons, I was impressed with the look and they are instantly recognizable as Srixon irons. The ZX7 Mk II has a traditional design without any plastic or metal badge in the cavity, it is just painted matte silver. Srixon let the ZX5 Mk II go with a very small and simple badge that is a combination of matte silver and chrome.

I like the look of both irons from address as well since they look so similar. The ZX7 Mk II has a slightly longer blade length and minimal offset that the lower handicap player will enjoy. But the ZX5 Mk II got most of that DNA as well. While being a little larger than the 7, it has great proportions and just a hair more offset. Both irons have a little thicker topline that is a little more squared than I expected but by no means distracting. Both irons feature Srixon’s famous Tour VT sole for fantastic turf interaction through a variety of turf conditions and swings.

Srixon ZX7 Mk II

I played the original ZX7 irons and loved them, along with many golfers! First shots with the new ZX7 Mk II reward you with an extremely soft and solid feel. The new PureFrame design puts more mass behind the center of the face and even with less than quality range balls you get to feel that ball compress while leaving the laser etched face. I have no doubt that with a real golf ball you will get that solid thud when the ZX7 Mk II strikes it on the turf.

While this iron is a single piece forged cavity back, it does offer some forgiveness on less than perfect shots. The club is very responsive and gives you immediate feedback, but still helps keep some ball speed and launch. Shots hit low on the face came out flat but the iron was able to keep some of the launch you need to produce a shot that wouldn’t kill your round. Consistency is a big feature with these irons and the most precise players will love the fact they can depend on their yardages when it matters. Dispersion for me was also tight with the ZX7 Mk II offering me a straight to just a slight fade ball flight. I could still turn it over and hit a draw but normal swings didn’t really include the left side too much.

Launch was a little lower than the ZX5 Mk II, but about a 1* or so but still easy to elevate for a lower ball hitter like myself. I haven’t been able to test out the Tour VT sole yes since all my testing has been off mats, but I have no doubt it will perform really well in the soft Michigan conditions like the previous ZX7 did.

Srixon ZX5 Mk II

The last version of this iron impressed me for all that it does in an impressive package and the ZX5 Mk II still amazes. The looks are great and Srixon did a great job of putter a bunch of ball speed and forgiveness in such an attractive package. The feel is really good for a multi-piece head, soft and with just a small click at impact. While you might lack just a touch of that ball compressing off the face feel, you will gain the feel of the ball jumping into the horizon. The ZX5 Mk II just feels fast and you can tell that thin face, with MainFrame technology, is working hard to up the ball speed. The great thing about the MainFrame fast is that I have not found a hot spot yet and believe me I have hit it all over the face.

Distance control is good and mishits still will give you plenty of carry to get it on the front or close to the green. Ballspeed was about 2 mph faster than the ZX7 Mk II for me and it spun about 100-150 RPM less with a 6-iron. The sole is noticeably wider than the 7 but still glides through mats with the same speed and should offer a little extra forgiveness on shots hit just a little behind the ball.

Overall, I think Srixon did exactly what they needed to with the ZX7 Mk II and ZX5 Mk II irons. They made slight improvements and didn’t change the great attributes of each iron. Will players who were fit into ZX7 and ZX5 irons notice a big difference and be forced to change? I don’t think so. These will be for the player who is looking for new irons and has heard or read the great things about the previous generation; they will be impressed.

Your Reaction?
  • 0
  • LEGIT0
  • WOW0
  • LOL0
  • IDHT0
  • FLOP0
  • OB0
  • SHANK0

Continue Reading

Equipment

What GolfWRXers are saying about PXG’s apparent new golf ball

Published

on

In our forums, our members have been discussing PXG’s apparent foray into the golf ball market. With the ball landing on the USGA Conforming List recently, WRXer ‘Scott406’ has reached out to fellow members for their thoughts on the new addition from PXG, who have been sharing their takes in our forum.

The Bob Parsons-founded company has provided no details on any upcoming launch or technical details of the ball or balls.

Here are a few posts from the thread, but make sure to check out the entire discussion and have your say at the link below.

  • snagy2000: “$49.99 is the rumor.”
  • golfinbrad: “Not sure why club companies want to get in the golf ball market. Way too many choices already. I look at Mizuno. Decent ball, but I’m not going to drop top dollar to try a ball when you know Pro V, TP5, etc., have already been proven. If PXG handles like the clubs, they will run some crazy low sales. Maybe it will work, and I’ll be wrong. Not the first time.”
  • Highlander24: “Alignment aid looks like Vice to me.”

Entire Thread: “What GolfWRXers are saying about PXG’s new golf ball

More from the Forums

Your Reaction?
  • 0
  • LEGIT1
  • WOW1
  • LOL1
  • IDHT0
  • FLOP0
  • OB0
  • SHANK3

Continue Reading

Whats in the Bag

Kevin Kisner WITB 2023 (February)

Published

on

kevin kisner witb 2023

Driver: Titleist TSR3 (9 degrees)
Shaft: Fujikura Ventus TR Red 6 X

Driver: Ping G430 LST (9 degrees)
Shaft: Fujikura Ventus TR Red 6 X

3-wood: Wilson Dynapwr (15 degrees)
Shaft: Fujikura Ventus Black 7 X

Hybrid: Callaway Apex UW (19 degrees)
Shaft: Mitsubishi Diamana PD 80 S

Irons: Wilson Staff
Shafts: Nippon N.S. Pro prototype

Wedges: Callaway Jaws Raw (52-10S), Vokey Design WedgeWorks (60-T)
Shafts: Nippon N.S. Pro Modus3 125 Wedge

Putter: Odyssey Tri-Hot 5K Seven
Grip: SuperStroke Zenergy Tour 2.0

Grips: Golf Pride Tour Velvet

Ball: Titleist Pro V1

More photos of Kevin Kisner’s what’s in the bag in the forums.

More Kevin Kisner WITBs

Your Reaction?
  • 12
  • LEGIT4
  • WOW3
  • LOL1
  • IDHT1
  • FLOP0
  • OB0
  • SHANK4

Continue Reading

WITB

Facebook

Trending