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New WedgeWorks 456.14 commemorates a very special Vokey anniversary

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In July 1997, Bob Vokey’s first wedge went into play on the PGA Tour at the FedEx St. Jude Classic. In the 20 years since, his wedges have become the most popular models on the PGA Tour. They are now dozens of Vokey wedge configurations available to golfers, but it all started with the one wedge that Vokey has recreated for a very special WedgeWorks launch.Vokey_45614_Limited_3

At the time, the special wedge that went in the bag of PGA Tour player Andy Bean in Memphis was just a prototype — the only markings on Bean’s wedge were the Titleist script and loft — but the wedge became known as the 456.14. The leading number (4) indicated that the wedge was a part of Vokey’s 400 Series, while 56 noted the loft and 14 noted the bounce (both measured in degrees).

”I had two in my bag, and let Andy try it,” Vokey says. “He canned the first one and lipped out the second one, and he says to me, ‘Voke, I’ve got to put this in play!'”

After confirming with Titleist’s R&D team that the wedge was conforming, Vokey obliged and Bean became the first PGA Tour player to use a Vokey wedge in competition.

The new, limited-edition wedges have the same rounded shape and increased offset as the original 456-14, and they’re currently available for purchase through Vokey.com or by custom order for $250. They have a polished-chrome finish, as well as Vokey’s new TX4 groove configuration, which are inspected for maximum sharpness and have a parallel face texture that the company says delivers more backspin and control. They’re also customizable with different stampings, characters paintfill, shafts, grips, shaft bands and ferrules.

Vokey_45614_Limited_1

Vokey says the added bounce of the 456-14 makes it best for golfers who play in soft conditions and soft sand, as well as those with steeper angles of attack.

Another important day for Bob Vokey this summer will come at the RBC Canadian Open, where the Verdun, Québec, native will be inducted into the Canadian Golf Hall of Fame. Vokey was born in Montreal and joined Titleist in 1996.

“This is something I would never have dreamed of as a young boy growing up in Verdun, working in my Dad’s machine shop,” Vokey says. “I’ve never forgotten where I came from, so to see my name on the same list of Canadian golf legends is overwhelming. I have always been surrounded by passionate, hardworking people who love the game as much as I do. This honor really is a reflection of everybody that has provided me the opportunities to live out my passion over the past 50 years in golf.”

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12 Comments

12 Comments

  1. Mad-Mex

    Jun 13, 2017 at 5:11 am

    Nah,,,, I’ll stick with Cleveland 588’s ,,,,,,

  2. Dave R

    Jun 8, 2017 at 5:05 pm

    Ya but aren’t you supposed to change you’re wedges every year? I think I read an article about that somewhere oh ya it was here.

  3. Warrick Lawrence

    Jun 8, 2017 at 5:27 am

    $250 for a single wedge does seem a bit steep, but then it is a commemorative piece. I don’t think you would actually play with one, but rather have it over the bar or displayed in your “Man cave”
    Ideal father’s day gift..from dad, (me)… to dad(me).
    But wait , I see he also has a signature series??? Which is more collectable?

  4. Duk Koo Kim

    Jun 8, 2017 at 5:00 am

    Huh, whaaaa only $2500 for a wedge?! That’s peanuts!! Oh wait, I thought I was in year 2080!

    $250!!!! Ahahahahahahahahaha!!! Come on Voke, dude, really……..2 fiddy, for a hunk ‘o steel?

    Please!!! Get ‘th kuhp (backwards) outta here!!

  5. Com

    Jun 8, 2017 at 3:07 am

    Spoken like a person who truly knows nothing, again. Well done. Congrats.

  6. KC

    Jun 7, 2017 at 3:59 pm

    $250 for a wedge is insane. Love my Vokeys but I got both of mine for $250 and they perform exactly the same as this one.

  7. coastieyaker

    Jun 7, 2017 at 11:56 am

    I am so fed up with overpriced gear. Vokey/Titleist should be ashamed for gouging the consumer the way they do.

  8. Xav

    Jun 7, 2017 at 11:38 am

    Why not play the original release if one can be found in mint condition?

    • Tom1

      Jun 7, 2017 at 7:08 pm

      “if” this design is over twenty years old ya would have better luck finding a hooker with all her teeth.

    • C

      Jun 8, 2017 at 1:43 pm

      Doubt the grooves would be conforming.

  9. Tom1

    Jun 7, 2017 at 11:10 am

    one of the best wedge design. I will gladly try em’

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Whats in the Bag

WITB Time Machine: Danny Willett’s winning WITB, 2016 Masters

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Driver: Callaway XR 16 (9 degrees)
Shaft: Mitsubishi Rayon Diamana W-Series 60 X
Length: 45.5 inches

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3-wood: Callaway XR 16 (15 degrees)
Shaft: Mitsubishi Rayon Diamana W-Series 70X

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5-wood: Callaway XR 16 (19 degrees)
Shaft: Mitsubishi Rayon Diamana W-Series 80X

Irons: Callaway Apex UT (2, 4), Callaway Apex Pro (5-9)
Shaft: True Temper Dynamic Gold X100 Superlite

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Wedges: Callaway Mack Daddy 2 (47-11 S-Grind) Callaway Mack Daddy 2 Tour Grind (54-11, 58-9)
Shaft: True Temper Dynamic Gold X100 Superlite

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Putter: Odyssey Versa #1 Wide (WBW)
Lie angle: 71 degrees

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Ball: Callaway Speed Regime SR-3

Check out more photos of Willett’s equipment from 2016 here.

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Project X Denali Blue, Black shaft Review – Club Junkie Review

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Originally, Project X was known for low-spin steel iron shafts. However, the company might now be known for wood shafts. Denali is the newest line of graphite shafts from Project X. With the Denali line, the company focuses on feel as well as performance.

There are two profiles in the Denali line, Blue and Black, to fit different launch windows. Denali Blue is the mid-launch and mid-spin profile for players who are looking for a little added launch and Denali Black is designed for low-launch and low-spin. Both models are going to offer you a smooth feel and accuracy.

For a full in-depth review check out the Club Junkie podcast on all podcast streaming platforms and on YouTube.

Project X Denali Blue

I typically fit better into mid-launch shafts, as I don’t hit a very high ball so the Denali Blue was the model I was more excited to try. Out of the box, the shaft looks great and from a distance, it is almost hard to tell the dark blue from the Denali Black. With a logo down install of the shaft, you don’t have anything to distract your eyes, just a clean look with the transition from the white and silver handle section to the dark navy mid and tip.

Out on the course, the Blue offers a very smooth feel that gives you a good kick at impact. The shaft loads easily and you can feel the slightly softer handle section compared to the HZRDUS lineup. This gives the shaft a really good feel of it loading on the transition to the downswing, and as your hands get to impact, the Denali Blue keeps going for a nice, strong kick.

Denali Blue is easy to square up at impact and even turn over to hit it straight or just little draws and most of the flex of the shaft feels like it happens right around where the paint changes from silver to blue. The Blue launches easily and produces what I consider a true mid-flight with the driver. While it is listed as mid-spin, I never noticed any type of rise in my drives. Drives that I didn’t hit perfectly were met with good stability and a ball that stayed online well.

Project X Denali Black

When you hold the Denali Black in your hands you can tell it is a more stout shaft compared to its Blue sibling by just trying to bend it. While the handle feels close to the Blue in terms of stiffness, you can tell the tip is much stiffer when you swing it.

Denali Black definitely takes a little more power to load it but the shaft is still smooth and doesn’t give you any harsh vibrations. Where the Blue kicks hard at impact, the Black holds on a little and feels like keeps you in control even on swings that you try and put a little extra effort into. The stiff tip section also makes it a little harder to square up at impact and for some players could take away a little of the draw from their shot.

Launch is lower and more penetrating compared to the Blue and produces a boring, flat trajectory. Shots into the wind don’t rise or spin up, proving that the spin stays down. Like its mid-launch sibling, the Black is very stable and mishits and keeps the ball on a straighter line. Shots low off the face don’t get very high up in the air, but the low spin properties get the ball out there farther than you would expect. For being such a stout shaft, the feel is very good, and the Denali Black does keep harsh vibrations from your hands.

Overall the Project X Denali Blue and Black are great additions to the line of popular wood shafts. If you are looking for good feel and solid performance the Denali line is worth trying out with your swing. Choose Blue for mid-launch and mid-spin or Black for lower launch and low spin.

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Equipment

What we know about Bryson DeChambeau’s 3D-printed Avoda irons

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Bryson DeChambeau fired an opening-round 7-under 65 at Augusta National, hitting an impressive 15 of 18 greens in regulation in the process. Golf’s mad scientist’s play grabbed headlines and so too did his equipment. In place of the Ping i230 irons he had in the bag last week for LIV Golf’s Miami event, DeChambeau is gaming a prototype 5-PW set of irons from little-known direct-to-consumer manufacturer Avoda.

What is Avoda Golf?

Founded by Tom Bailey, also a Mike Schy student like Bryson DeChambeau, Avoda Golf is a direct-to-consumer golf equipment company that currently manufactures both single and variable-length irons in one model that are available for pre-order.

What irons is Bryson DeChambeau playing?

Per multiple reports, DeChambeau is playing a custom-designed set of single-length irons that incorporate bulge and roll into the face design. The two-piece 3D-printed irons were reportedly only approved for play by the USGA this week, according to Golfweek’s Adam Schupak.

Regarding the irons, DeChambeau told Golf Channel the irons’ performance on mishits was the determining factor in putting them in play this week. “When I mishit on the toe or the heel,” DeChambeau said. “It seems to fly a lot straighter for me and that’s what has allowed me to be more comfortable over the ball.”

What can we tell about the design of the clubs?

These days, it is a little hard to speculate on what is under the hood with so many hollow body irons. DeChambeau’s irons look to be hollow on the lower section as they do flare back a decent amount. That “muscle” on the back also looks to be fairly low on the iron head, but we can assume that is progressive through the set, moving up higher in the short irons.

A screw out on the toe is probably used to seal up the hollow cavity and used as a weight to dial in the swing weight of the club. From pictures, it is hard to tell but the sole looks to have a little curve from heel to toe while also having some sharper angles on them. A more boxy and sharper toe section looks to be the design that suits Bryson’s eye based on the irons he has gravitated toward recently.

What are bulge and roll, again?

Two types of curvature in a club face, traditionally incorporated only in wood design. Bulge is heel-toe curvature. Roll is crown-sole curvature. Both design elements are designed to mitigate gear effect on off-center strikes and produce shots that finish closer to the intended target line. (GolfTec has an excellent overview of bulge and roll with some handy GIFs for the visual learner)

What else is in DeChambeau’s bag?

Accompanying his traditional Sik putter, Bryson builds his set with a Ping Glide 4.0 wedges, a Krank Formula Fire driver and 5-wood, and a TaylorMade BRNR Mini Driver, all with LA Golf graphite shafts.

 

 

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