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Ping Glide 2.0 wedges: What you need to know

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Ping’s Glide 2.0 wedges are the sequel to the company’s original Glide wedges, which were released in 2015 to critical acclaim. With big shoes to fill, the Glide 2.0’s are pushing the boundaries of groove sharpness, and offer several other upgrades over the originals to help improve performance and feel.

The Glide 2.0 wedges are currently available for pre-order: $150 per wedge with a steel shaft, $175 per wedge with a graphite shaft. Here are 6 more things you need to know about them.

1) Sharper Grooves, and More of Them

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Ever since the USGA rolled back its rules on grooves at the turn of the decade, eliminating “square grooves,” golf equipment companies have been looking to create higher-spinning wedges through other means. With its Glide 2.0 wedges, Ping has upped the sharpness and number of its grooves to give golfers more spin. The company says the new grooves have “sharper groove edges than any previous Ping wedge.”

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Working within the USGA’s groove rules, Ping uses a wheel-cut milling process to create the sharper groove edges, which interact more with the cover of the ball to produce more friction at impact… and thus more spin.

Ping also uses different groove designs based on a wedge’s loft.

  • The lower-lofted wedges (46, 50 and 52 degrees) have 20-degree groove sidewalls with a 0.005-inch edge radius to improve full-shot performance.
  • The higher-lofted wedges (54, 56, 58 and 60 degrees) have 28-degree sidewalls with a 0.004-inch edge radius to impart more spin on shots around the green.

The company also spaced its grooves closer together so it could add an additional groove to its lower-lofted wedges, and two additional grooves to its higher-lofted wedges. For average golfers and Tour players alike, the results will be more spin and consistency. Golfers should also see a slightly lower launch angle and a more penetrating flight, according to Ping.

“These grooves are better than square grooves,” says Marty Jertson, Senior Club Designer at Ping. “And they’re very close to the [legal] limit.”

2) Hydropearl Finish, 431 Stainless Steel

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Ping used to design its wedges with what it called a “blast” finish, but the company discovered that a new “hydropearl” finish works better to fend off water and grass at impact, leading to more consistency.

The new finish has a high degree of “hydrophobicity,” or its ability to repel water. The finish is especially beneficial for golfers when they’re playing from thick grass, wet grass or in the morning dew.

Like the original Glide wedges, Glide 2.0 wedge heads are cast from 431 stainless steel.

3) Bounce Remains an Issue, Ping Clears It Up

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The two hottest issues in golf when it comes to wedges are grinds and bounce. Despite all the industry talk about those two words in recent years, Ping data suggests most golfers are still confused about them.

In an effort to clear it up, Ping has decided to advertise the bounce number on its wedges. The company encourages golfers to “use the bounce,” and make sure to get fit into a wedge that has the right bounce for their game and typical playing conditions.

4) All Four Grinds Available

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When Ping launched its original Glide wedges, it at first only released its three most popular grinds: Wide Sole (WS), Standard Sole (SS) and Thin Sole (TS). A few months later, it added its specialized Eye Sole (ES) grind. With the launch of the Glide 2.0 wedges, all four grinds are being offered from the start.

The ES (available in 54-08, 56-08, 58-08 and 60-08) is a bunker-specific grind inspired by the company’s Eye 2 wedge that can help golfers find more consistency. Its leading edge is made a bit sharper than Ping’s other wedges, but its sole has more bounce. That encourages the sole to dip below the below the surface of the sand and then glide through, which is particularly helpful on open-face shots from the sand or rough. Its thinner hosel also more easily moves through the sand, especially when the face is positioned opened.

Ping also made updates to the other three grind options in the line.

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WS (56-14, 58-14, 60-14): The already wide sole has been widened, but the bounce has been toned back by 1 degree compared to the original “WS” design. The new sole will be especially effective in powdery or fluffy sand, according to Ping.

TS (58-06, 60-06): After much testing with Tour players, a lot of research and many prototypes, Ping’s WRX-inspired half-moon sole design was implemented into the TS grind in the Glide 2.0 wedges. It has much more heel and toe relief than the original TS grind.

SS (46-12, 50-12, 52-12, 54-12, 56-12, 58-10, 60-10): The standard sole, which is the best grind for the majority of golfers, underwent only minor changes to the heel relief and leading edge. Ping says the changes make them glide even a little more easily through the turf and sand than the original models.

5) Ping Encourages You to Grip Down

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As seen on the original Glide wedge, the Glide 2.0 come with a grip that’s longer than your typical club grip — it measures about 0.75 inches longer than a typical grip. That’s because the company encourages golfers to grip down on the club more often to improve distance and club face control, and the lengthened grip allows golfers to do so.

6) Shafts, Specs and More

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Glide 2.0 wedges come stock with a custom-engineered AWT 2.0 Wedge shaft that is optimized in weight (118 grams), flex and balance for wedge shots, according to Ping. Also available at no upcharge are the KBS Tour, True Temper Dynamic Dynamic Gold, Nippon N. S. Pro Modus 3 105, XP 95, and Project X shafts.

See more photos of the Glide 2.0 wedges in our forums, and join the discussion. 

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He played on the Hawaii Pacific University Men's Golf team and earned a Masters degree in Communications. He also played college golf at Rutgers University, where he graduated with a Bachelor of Arts in Journalism.

1 Comment

1 Comment

  1. Ball

    Sep 8, 2019 at 2:20 pm

    Some of the best wedges I’ve ever played, very forgiving

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James Ingles resurrects custom putter brand

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Everybody loves a comeback story. Ben Hogan post-1949. Tiger Woods post-2009. You remember the first act and are now given a glimpse at what a second act could become. It’s a chance to reimagine and build on success. While the reason James Ingles Putters has been placed on hiatus for the last five years isn’t exactly “rock and roll,” they are indeed back on the market and ready to deliver. If you’re in the dark on James Ingles Putters’ history and/or why they’re back, here’s the story…

James Ingles started playing golf when he was 14 years old in 1997, which was an exciting time in golf, especially in the world of equipment and putters more specifically. Around that time, he purchased a special edition Scotty Cameron putter, which was inspired by David Duval, who was his favorite player at the time. He rushed home excited to show the new flatstick to his dad. His dad proceeded to look it over and sort of brushed it off as just a machine-made, milled steel putter. There were probably thousands of others just like it.

Heel-shafted blade 28g James Ingles Putter made from a copper alloy called Coldur A

That may be a curious reaction to most people, but as it turns out, James’ father has a unique frame of reference for this sort of thing. At that time in 1997, he happened to own Charles Hellis & Sons, a bespoke gunsmith in the London area (about 18 months ago he sold the business and retired). In his trade, no two items are alike. They begin with a quality forging and are then finished by hand to the customer’s specific requests. Shotguns from makers in and around London are known all over the world for their craftsmanship and attention to detail. It also happens that a lot of the steps in the gun making process actually transfer quite well to making putters.

In 2009, James approached the head gunsmith at Hellis and asked him if it was possible to make a putter in-house. That conversation started the development of James’ first putter, an 8802-style blade known as his 28g model. James uses the same forging house as Charles Hellis, which has been in business since 1904 and served many industries over the years. Hand engraving, when requested by the customer, is done by independent third-party engravers who also serve the local shotgun industry.

“I’d been around Hellis since my early teens, so I had at least seen and therefore had an appreciation for the machining and hand engraving that goes into shotgun manufacturing.  I spent a lot of time on the aesthetics of that first putter because I really wanted to get that right.  We knew there was going to be a fair amount of handwork involved in finishing the putter after the forging, but ensuring the overall shape of that forging was absolutely critical.”

Custom heel-toe weighted blade putter with hand engraving from James Ingles Putters

It’s worth taking a quick pause to point out an important distinction. There are loads of high-quality CNC milled putters today, which are milled by a computer to exacting tolerances from a 3D CAD model (think Tyson Lamb, Logan Olson, and the like). The “old fashioned” way many putter makers (such as T.P. Mills and his contemporaries) would have crafted their putters would have been start-to-finish on a hand-operated milling machine. One of the things that sets James’ putters apart is that they are first forged into a rough shape (not dissimilar to the way many forged irons are made) and then milled by hand into the finished product. This isn’t to say one method is objectively better or worse than another, only that they perhaps may arrive at a different result and may be for different customers.

“When we first came to market, everything we sold was direct to the consumer.  The golf industry was quite different in those days, so if you wanted to be competitive, you had to keep cost and margins as low as possible.  Then we started to partner with Scratch in 2013, which made sense for a lot of reasons.  Essentially, Scratch would work with the customer to define specifications and such.  They would send us that information and we would make the putters.  When Scratch went under in 2015, there were a host of other things going on in my life, though.  My first child had just been born and I had a full-time career as well, so going back to the way things were didn’t make sense.  I didn’t have the capability to have everything go directly through me anymore, so we made the decision to kind of shut things down for a while.”

Custom James Ingles Putter Covers

For the last five years, James’ life has mainly been focused on raising his two young kids and making a living as a building surveyor. By his own admission, he hadn’t even been playing much golf and had instead taken up long-distance running. Then, the COVID-19 pandemic started taking hold, and he started to introduce his now-five-year-old son to golf.

“We had gone to the driving range and Jude was having lots of fun hitting golf balls.  I also started to realize I could actually find the middle of the club face every now and again, so that was promising.  I then took him to the local pitch-and-putt and all of a sudden, all of my enjoyment for golf really just started flooding back.  I started an Instagram account for the golf business [@jamesinglesputters by the way] and posted pictures of Jude and I playing and also pictures of old putters I’d found lying around my garage.  Loads of people started commenting and messaging and it just felt like there was some unfinished business there.  Ultimately, I suppose that’s why we’re launching the business again and you and I are having this conversation.”

James Ingles putters have two main forgings that they can work from: the aforementioned 28g and also the 12g, a traditional heel-toe weighted blade design which can be finished in a number of ways depending on the customer’s preference. They are also capable of milling custom shapes from billet steel.  In addition to putters, James will be doing many small runs of accessories such as putter covers, ball markers, and divot tools.  All information can be found on his new website.

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Callaway announces huge all-stock merger deal with Topgolf

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Callaway Golf has announced an all-stock merger agreement with TopGolf with the number of shares to be issued based upon an implied equity value of Topgolf of approximately $2 billion – including the 14% already owned by Callaway.

Callaway first invested in the golf entertainment company, Topgolf, back in 2006 entering an exclusive golf partnership agreement at all Topgolf venues.

 

On the new deal expected to be completed in early 2021, Chip Brewer, President and Chief Executive Officer of Callaway said that the all-stock merger between the two can create “an unrivaled golf and entertainment business”.

“Together, Callaway and Topgolf create an unrivaled golf and entertainment business. This combination unites proven leaders with a shared passion for delivering exceptional golf experiences for all from elite touring professionals to new and aspiring entrants to the game. We’ve long seen the value in Topgolf and we are confident that together, we can create a larger, higher growth, technology-enabled global golf and entertainment leader.”

Under the terms of the merger agreement, Callaway will issue approximately 90 million shares of its common stock to the shareholders of Topgolf, excluding Callaway, which currently holds approximately 14% of Topgolf’s outstanding shares. Upon completion of the merger, Callaway shareholders will own approximately 51.5%, and Topgolf shareholders (excluding Callaway) will own about 48.5% of the combined company on a fully diluted basis.

Topgolf’s revenue for 2019 was approximately $1.1 billion, and the company currently has 63 locations worldwide, including 58 in the U.S., and has more than 23 million customers. Find out all about Topgolf here.

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What irons are left-handers playing? – GolfWRXers discuss

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In our forums, our lefty members have been dishing on the irons currently in their bag. WRXer ‘1221’ is in the market for a new set and wants to see what other left-handers have been finding success with, and our members have been sharing their clubs in our forum.

Here are a few posts from the thread, but make sure to check out the entire discussion and have your say at the link below.

  • dclccoritti: “Titleist…all blades. Love the look of the new TM P7-CB’s.”
  • LeftyMatt24: “I’m in T100s bent weak. They are an awesome middle ground between blades and players. Titleist offers their full line in left and right-handed. The new SEL from Mizuno is a good option. Can’t go wrong with Srixon z785 either.”
  • The_Champ: “Ping Blueprint.”
  • Llefty: “Srixon 585 3-PW and Bridgestone JGR Tour B HF2 5-AW.”

Entire Thread: “What irons are left-handers playing?

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