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Spotted: Ping i200 irons

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PGA Tour winner Ted Purdy hasn’t finished in the top-10 of a PGA Tour event since 2009, but he’s a favorite with golf equipment fans tonight.

The 43-year-old posted a photo on social media of a set of Ping irons marked “i200” that the company is yet to announce. “Now these are sweet,” he said. “The NEW @PingTour i200.”

What’s new about the i200 irons? What makes them “sweet?” It appears that Ping may be spilling the beans sooner rather than later.

See what GolfWRX Members are saying about the irons in our forum.

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46 Comments

46 Comments

  1. Michael

    Jan 12, 2017 at 8:14 am

    Also see link: http://clubping.jp/product/. From there you can get to i200 specs, new putter line the Sigma G and Ping Glide 2.0 specs

  2. DevilDog18

    Jan 8, 2017 at 10:08 pm

    Mizuno T-Zoids! Yet cast….

  3. Big lefty

    Jan 8, 2017 at 5:14 am

    Most likely these are miura / shaped by / or custom shaped for x player by ping clubmaker then stamped with “ping” for the tour pro. The masses will get something that looks similar and plays very different. Wake up folks the stuff the big boys are playing is not at all the same so don’t let the marketing fool you. Get fit for something that suits your game and stick with it. I played on small tours and saw this first hand when moving up to the big tour for Monday’s believe me this was over fifteen years ago and this is the way it was and it has never changed.

  4. Chunkiebuck

    Jan 6, 2017 at 10:45 pm

    Sure looks familiar, didn’t TM do the ribbed look back in 2001?

  5. Dave R

    Jan 6, 2017 at 8:59 pm

    Ping has not made a good iron since the eye2. I have hit them all when they came out. Will stick to my mizuno …… thanks.

    • The Stallion

      Jan 7, 2017 at 11:32 am

      No …… thank you for that incredible comment! Enjoy your mizuno!

  6. Guia

    Jan 6, 2017 at 8:32 pm

    Basically, just another deep cavity iron, low back weighting, etc. I am sure it will work because all the others work also. Nothing to get excited about.

    I have a number of sets of pings, Eye2 BeCu, ISI Nickel, ISI BeCu, G30, G30 Max, and any number of drivers and putters. They all work well, but dependent on the lofts they all play the same.

    • Tom

      Jan 7, 2017 at 11:19 am

      or the person playing them. I played with a member who had the same set I have, His results are vastly different than mine

  7. Brian

    Jan 6, 2017 at 6:50 pm

    Finally, Ping has made a club I may actually put in my bag since the 1990s. Last Ping I played were Eye2s.

  8. GolfBum

    Jan 5, 2017 at 5:44 pm

    Hope they offer decent shafts on this model. I am looking at this release to see if they might go that direction. If other manufacturers like Mizuno can offer decent shafts at no upcharge for irons, why can it not be done by PING?

    No upcharge shafts by some manufacturers is classified as upcharge by PING, where I am from it is a very expensive to go outside the normal offerings, especially if you play regular shafts.

    Currently play PING clubs but might venture elsewhere if the shaft selections does not improve.

    • bob

      Jan 6, 2017 at 1:54 pm

      look at the base price of mizuno irons and you can understand why there is no upcharge.

    • The Stallion

      Jan 7, 2017 at 11:35 am

      There are 6 no charge steel shafts available. Most golfers can be well-fit into one of those. The I200 will retail for $125/club. Most Mizuno irons retail for $150/clubs. Would you rather Ping up the price across the board like that? I wouldn’t.

  9. Mat

    Jan 5, 2017 at 4:18 pm

    At an equipment website, you see a leaked photo, and you’re meowing about not seeing it top-down? What, are you going to be “that guy” that yells FINALLY when it is officially released? Ugh.

  10. Brian

    Jan 5, 2017 at 1:37 pm

    Agreed…I’d really like to see the topline and the sole.

  11. bogeypro

    Jan 5, 2017 at 11:27 am

    They look like TaylorMade RAC LT2 irons from 2005ish. I like them!

  12. TexasSnowman

    Jan 5, 2017 at 10:56 am

    Look VERY GOOD. Note to OEMs; lose the large logos, bright colored badges, etc and give us more options like this.

    This goes for everything in my opinion; for example, as a recreational golfer why does my golf bag need a giant manufacturer logo painted on the it?

  13. Brian

    Jan 5, 2017 at 10:12 am

    Decent looking Ping irons, for a change. I would consider those if they were forged and the production models looked like that. Knowing Ping, they’ll slap a colored badge on and Ugly them up.

  14. JR

    Jan 5, 2017 at 9:26 am

    Look like some 20 year old Taylor Made clubs!!

  15. Excited

    Jan 5, 2017 at 8:32 am

    I saw these in person and at address they look similar to the iblade iron (AWESOME). I was also told from someone I consider a highly reliable source that the MOI on this iron is BETTER than the wide soled G15 from a few years back. With the great looks, if it is truly that forgiving…. THEY WILL HAVE A WINNER!

  16. CARSON

    Jan 5, 2017 at 8:30 am

    these Irons are awesome on of my tour players were telling me about them and he said that there the best iron they have some out with in 10 years. the top line is super thin and the PW to the 4 iron look great the offset is perfect and the performance is great yall are going to love these most of the tour players will switch other then the guys playing the Iblades

    • Excited

      Jan 5, 2017 at 8:33 am

      They look flat awesome! I was unable to hit one though 🙁

  17. Jim

    Jan 5, 2017 at 7:59 am

    Look like a TM iron with a Ping CTP weight. After the elegance of the Ping I series this is a major disappointment at visually. And what’s with the name, shouldn’t it be Ping I-e2 to keep with the simpler names they were loud about with the recent releases, saying that the name would remain the same for each new release? They might still be a very good iron but they’re off to a poor start in my opinion.

  18. Prut

    Jan 5, 2017 at 7:05 am

    Ping RACs?

  19. Johnnylongballz

    Jan 5, 2017 at 3:07 am

    Sweet! Looks like the I25 and S55 made a beautiful baby.

    • Jack

      Jan 5, 2017 at 4:08 am

      Agree! Whoever designed these clubs, S55, iBlade should definitely get a raise. These are beautiful clubs.

    • Excited

      Jan 5, 2017 at 8:34 am

      TOTALLY AGREE!

  20. Nu

    Jan 5, 2017 at 2:44 am

    Wow. Talk about a straight up TM rip. With just the Ping CTP.

  21. Neil Cameron

    Jan 5, 2017 at 1:15 am

    look like miura cb57

  22. rymail00

    Jan 5, 2017 at 12:31 am

    Wow, they look great from the pics.

  23. Johnny Wells

    Jan 4, 2017 at 10:24 pm

    this looks reminds me of TM’s 360 irons a little bit

  24. NolanMBA

    Jan 4, 2017 at 10:05 pm

    Love the simplicity.

  25. coolhandbirdman

    Jan 4, 2017 at 9:59 pm

    Hope they stay this way, I don’t like badges on the iE1’s.

  26. Andrew

    Jan 4, 2017 at 9:06 pm

    Sexy. Looks like the i25 with a cleaner cavity.

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Equipment

The most popular golf shoes on Amazon right now (Fall 2020 edition)

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What are the most popular golf shoes on Amazon right now? From time to time, we like to get out of our little bubble of OEM releases and what’s being played on tour to look at what golf consumers are buying on one of the largest online retail marketplaces: Amazon.

Here are some of the best-selling golf shoes on Amazon as of October 2020.

1. Adidas Men’s Tech Response Golf Shoes

From the listing:Mesh/synthetic. Imported. Synthetic sole. Thintech, adituff, thintech cleat, traxion, adiwear. Lightweight mesh and synthetic upper for enhanced breathability and comfort. Soft eva insole for lightweight comfort and cushioning. 6-spike configuration with thintech low-profile technology for improved traction and stability.”

Price: $59.99

Buy here.

2. Skechers Go Golf Men’s Torque Waterproof Golf Shoe

From the listing:Synthetic. Imported. lace-up. Rubber sole. Shaft measures approximately mid-top from arch. Replaceable soft spikes. Waterproof.”

Price: $59.99

Buy here.

3. FootJoy Men’s Fj Flex Golf Shoes

 

From the listing:100% Textile. Imported. Synthetic sole. Shaft measures approximately mid-top from arch. Performance Mesh – lightweight performance mesh delivers incredible comfort, breathability and all-day comfort. Complete support – a soft EVA midsole provides increased underfoot cushioning, enhanced comfort and exceptional stability.”

Price: $89.99

Buy here.

4. PUMA Men’s Ignite Nxt Lace Golf Shoe

From the listing:100% Textile and Synthetic. Imported. Synthetic sole. Shaft measures approximately low-top from arch. Sole shield. Performance Mesh +TPU. Ignite Foam.”

Price: $99.99

Buy here.

5. Skechers GO GOLF Men’s Max Golf Shoe

From the listing:Imported. Rubber sole. Shaft measures approximately mid-top from arch. Skechers Goga Max insole delivers enhanced high-rebound cushioning for all day comfort. Durable grip tpu outsole with a spikeless bottom. Lightweight. Water resistant. Synthetic upper.”

Price: $74.97

Buy here.

6. Adidas Men’s Tour360 Xt Spikeless Golf Shoe

From the listing: Leather and Synthetic. Imported. Synthetic sole. Shaft measures approximately low-top from arch. Leather and microfiber synthetic upper. Spikeless Puremotion outsole for enhanced flexibility and grip with X-Traxion primary lugs for grip and balance.”

Price: $135.59

Buy here.

7. FootJoy Men’s Fj Originals Golf Shoes

From the listing: Built on the Austin Last, this last offers the fullest rounded toe character, fullest fit across forefoot, standard instep and heel. EVA (ethyl vinyl acetate) Fit-Beds provide lightweight cushioning underfoot. EVA does not take a set, so the cushioning will remain the same for the life of the shoe. This easy care synthetic upper offers outstanding 1 year waterproof comfort, breathability, and durability.”

Price: $89.95

Buy here.

8. Skechers Women’s Max Golf Shoe

From the listing:Imported. Rubber sole. Shaft measures approximately mid-top from arch. Spikeless, durable grip tpu outsole. Ultra-lightweight, responsive ULTRA Flight cushioning. Goga max insole delivers enhanced high-rebound cushioning. Water resistant. Synthetic upper.”

Price: $57.55

Buy here.

9. FootJoy Women’s Sport Retro-Previous Season Style Golf Shoes

From the listing: ” Lightweight – the linen-textured synthetic uppers offer lightweight comfort and durability. Cushioned rubber – the gum rubber outsole is a soft rubber compound which provides flexibility and comfort. Enhanced traction – This molded rubber outsole provides turf gripping performance and durability.”

Price: $59.95

Buy here.

10. New Balance Men’s Sweeper Waterproof Spiked Comfort Golf Shoe

From the listing: Synthetic. Imported.Rubber sole.Shaft measures approximately low-top from arch. Waterproof microfiber leather upper. REVlite 10mm drop* midsole provides lightweight cushioning & premium responsiveness. NDurance rubber outsole with removable FTS 3.0 Pulsar spikes.”

Price: $59.99

Buy here.

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Justin Thomas: What makes him an elite wedge player

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It might be easy to say that a player like Justin Thomas is near the top of the leaderboard because

  1. He hits it the best
  2. He drives it long and relatively straight
  3. He is having a good putting week

I would agree and disagree with all three. Yes, they are definitely factors, but in my opinion, it’s his wedge play that has been the most notable part of his game—especially in 2020.

If you look at the stats, you will find a player who is not only damn-near deadly from 150 yards and in, but also a player who gets out of trouble about as well as anyone in the top 10 in the world.

We are talking about 2020 as a whole FYI.

(Stats via PGATour.com)

Now strokes gained wedge stats have multiple variables affecting the ultimate stat, fairways hit, where a player misses it, out of the rough vs out of the fairway, putting, yada, yada, yada….

At this point, if I had to pick a player to get it done around the greens it would JT or Jon Rahm. True artists. Go back and watch some of the shots from the FedEx at TPC Southwind or even Kapalua this year, it was the reliance on his wedges that became the secret sauce. Like the putter, good wedge play can be an equalizer when anything else is falling short. And when the rest of the bag is decent, for a player like JT, good wedge play equals wins.

I wanted to dig in a little deeper, so I asked my old friend, Vokey’s Aaron Dill a few questions on what makes JT unique with a wedge in his hands…

JW: As far as technique, what in his action makes JT so good? And if you could compare him to someone who would it be?

AD: Justin’s technique is really something to watch. His ability to stay loose, calm, and maintain effortless speed while delivering the wedge accurately really shows his comfort with a wedge in his hands. Justin keeps the club out in front of him and he has mastered the ability to control his golf ball’s flight and spin.  I could compare him to many, but I sometimes feel he is in a league of his own.  

JW: Beyond the great shots we see on highlight reels, where does JT really get it done from an SG perspective? What do you see that the average person wouldn’t? 

AD: Justin does it all very well. You know this because he is 9th in SG around the green and this is partly due to his spotless technique but his ability to scramble in difficult situations. Something he does that amazes me is his creative vision of shots. There are times when he is in a situation where he hits a shot we don’t expect or think of. His comfort with a wedge is fun to watch, he makes all short game shots seem like they are no big deal and you can see this by his free-flowing, loose and speedy wedge action. You can tell he feels at peace with his wedge technique.

JW: He has an interesting set up for his wedges that has been well covered, but since you first met him, how has his understanding and approach to his wedges and wedge play evolved?

AD: Justin’s wedge set is unique, however, a lot of thought and intelligence has gone into crafting this matrix. Since the first time I met him, he has worked hard and he has always had the desire to want to improve and push himself. You can see it in his strength training, his increase in ball speed, and his general approach to competitive golf. His knowledge of his short game has improved over the years and it shows in his success. You can see how comfortable he feels when a wedge is pulled from the bag, you can bet he will be landing the ball close to the hole setting himself up for a makable putt.

Justin Thomas’ wedge specs 

Wedges: Titleist Vokey Design Raw SM7 (46-10F @47.5, 52-12F @52.5), Vokey SM8 (56-14F @57), Titleist Vokey Design WedgeWorks (60T @ 60.5)

Shafts: True Temper Dynamic Gold Tour Issue X100 (46), True Temper Dynamic Gold Tour Issue S400 (52-60)

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Equipment

How to pick the right putter

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In the game of golf, putting is the great equalizer. It doesn’t take speed or strength and simply requires you to select a line and hit a ball at the right speed—easier said than done. But regardless of your skill level, it is the one club in your set you really never have to upgrade once you find the right one, which is why knowing how to pick the right putter is so important.

This is the GolfWRX guide to selecting the right putter for you.

How to pick the right putter: The right look

This one seems simple, but you have to like the look of your putter and feel comfortable lining it up. For some golfers, that means finding a more traditional heel and toe weighted blade with a basic metal finish, for others that could also mean a larger mallet style that inspires confidence thanks to its larger footprint and contrasting colors.

Between the two aforementioned styles, there are still varying hosel/neck (where the shaft meet the head) configurations that can change how a putter wants to naturally rest when being held which can, in turn, change the natural toe hang of the putter and how it will fit.

How to pick the right putter: Understanding putter toe hang types

  • Face Balanced – Depending on the hosel configuration, this style can be found on both mallet and blade-style putters, and when being balanced by the shaft, the face will sit perpendicular to 12 o’clock. These are intended to fit golfers with a straight back-straight through stroke/minimal face rotation.

  • 1/2 Toe Hang – This is the most neutral type of toe hang and sits between the face balanced and full toe down. It is found on most heel-toe blade putters with full-shaft offset (Scotty Cameron Newport 2 shown) and is for slightly arcing strokes with medium face rotation.

  • Toe Down/Full Toe Hang  – This type is only going to be found on the most heel-shafted blade-style putters, and when being balanced by the shaft, the toe will face “6 0’clock”—directly down to the ground. These are intended to fit golfers with the most extremely arcing stroke and high level of face rotation.

NOTE: There are multiple variations of 1/2 toe hang that sit both closer to full toe down and face-balanced all designed to fit various stroked depending on the amount of arc and face rotation.

Whatever reason you have for picking the putter you ultimately use, make sure you like the looks of it because you’re going to be seeing a lot of each other.

How to pick the right putter: Understanding your stroke style

Your putting stroke will inevitably play a big role in the putter you select because certain styles are going to work better for certain golfers depending on their putting stroke style, which is referenced above. To make it easy to understand—putting strokes can be put into three categories, and for visual reference, check out the handy guide below with pictures supplied by our friends at Ping.

Slight Arc

Fitter and golfer reviewing PING Color Code Chart

This is where most golfers fit in since it is the most natural stroke to make. A slight arc is also what I like to call a neutral stroke, meaning that when it comes to picking a putter it gives the golfers the most options for finding one that is going to fit best.

Straight back and straight through

Fitter applying impact tape to bottom of iron

A straight back and straight through stroke can help a lot of golfers eliminate variables, and when paired with the right putter can really help those that struggle to get putts started on line. Golfers in this category usually perform best with a face-balanced putter.

Strong Arc

Fitter watching golfer hit shots

A strongly arced stroke is the exact opposite of straight back-straight through and requires the most amount of practice and technique to maintain consistency. Players with a strong arc generally also use a lot more wrist in their stroke and because of the inconsistency, this stroke creates, there are fewer putters on the market that fit this type.

Putting it all together

Once you have selected your putter, the last step is getting it dialed into your final spec for length, lie, and loft. For length, the goal is to be able to stand in a comfortable putting position with your eyes over the ball or, just inside of your eye line.

For lie and loft, it is best to see a fitter, since it requires specialized tools to properly adjust, but if you are trying to get an idea for the direction your putter will need to be bent use the reference guide below.

To see how a professional putting fitting is conducted, check out the video below from TXG

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