Ping is known for making great game improvement irons, but the company’s G25 irons for 2013 will be special. Over the years, many PGA Tour players have used Ping “G” series irons because of their forgiveness. The difference between the 2013 G25 irons and previous G-series irons is that this year’s model is the total package — it has all the benefits of a game-improvement iron without the usual bulky soles that are inherent in the GI class.

Marty Jertson, a senior design engineer for Ping, said the company wanted to re-align the size of the new iron to be more in the sweet spot of the game-improvement category.

“We felt like we were going past that with the sole widths on models like the G20,” Jertson said.

The G25 irons feature thinner, more progressive sole widths, thinner top lines and moderate offset, which will appeal to golfers of all skill levels. The progressive sole widths provide higher-launching, more-forgiving long irons, and short irons with added playability and control.

Click here to see more pics and read the discussion in the forums

Performance

A staple of Ping’s irons, the Custom Tuning Port (CTP), was repositioned lower on the face on the G25s — so low that it required engineers to halve the size of the CTP from previous models, as it now rests against the sole of the club.

g-25 iron
This increases the efficiency of the irons, better aligning the impact line, a line perpendicular to the loft of an iron, with the club’s force line at impact. According to Jertson, this means the face won’t rotate as much at impact, resulting in less energy loss and more ball speed.

Engineers also thinned the faces of the G25 irons. The face deflection (read: springiness) of the face hasn’t changed — it’s actually similar to the deflection of the G20 irons. But the thinner faces do allow for the redistribution of weight in more optimal places. This allowed Ping to increase the forgiveness of the long irons, and design short irons that have a flatter trajectory.

“The easiest way to get inertia is to just widen the sole,” Jertson said. “But we didn’t want to do that. [With the G25 irons] we wanted to give the same forgiveness package as the G20 irons, but with more versatility.”

Support bars in the cavity of the G25 irons stabilize the 17-4 stainless steel face to ensure a solid feel and exceptional distance control throughout the set. Engineers also also tweaked the materials, thicknesses, density, weight and even the process of adhesion of the multi-material cavity badge, proving that that badges are much more than a sticker that’s glued to the back of an iron for aesthetics. They’re factors that can make or break the performance and feel of a cavity back iron.

Click here to see more pics and read the discussion in the forums

Versatility

There is a significant change in the width and the “effective” bounce on the G25 soles on the 7 iron through pitching wedge.The soles are more narrow, and a trailing edge grind means the soles of the G25 are closer the the size of the Ping’s i20 and Anser Forged irons. This will translate into more control for better players, because more sole width and bounce can interfere with a player’s trajectory and ability to make crisp contact out of the rough.

The grinds will reduce the working or “effective” bounce on the sole, meaning the club head will rip through the turf with more ease. That will give lower-handicap players an exciting opportunity to experiment with a more forgiving irons without the typical drawback of wide soles. Bravo to Ping.

Below is a chart where we measured sole width at the center of the face with calipers to compare the G25 to other Ping models, as well as comparison photos:


Click here to see more pics and read the discussion in the forums

Looks

The word that came out of our mouth when we opened the box for the first time was “badass.” Pardon our french, but it is to hard to describe our reaction without just saying it. These irons look sinister — dark and high tech. The non-glare grey finish reminds us of the murdered out carbon fiber panels of the Audi R8 super car. A high-tech, modern oozes from this design.

Ping says the G25’s thinner top lines and moderate offset offer a look that will appeal to a wide variety of golfers that are looking for a high-launching, extremely forgiving game-improvement model with a chassis that resembles a players iron. At address, the toplines look great and the overall shape frames the ball nicely.

In addition, the non-glare matte finish will help reduce reflections in bright conditions. The finish begs to hit the range, and will fade with use in a way that will add character over time.



Tech Specs

Click here to see what people are saying about Ping’s G25 irons in the “Tour/Pre-release equipment” forum. 

Click here to see what people are saying about Ping’s G25 irons in the “Tour/Pre-release equipment” forum. 

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51 COMMENTS

  1. Been hitting the Ping G25 irons the past year. Probably 20 rounds with range practice. Really like them for their forgiveness and solid, smooth feel at impact. I am a little disappointed in wear to the face and overall fading of the dark grey finish. Not so much the fact that they have gotten lighter but they look splochy. Wondering if anybody has had the same experience.

  2. Went to an Outdoor fitting with a trackman today. A rarity on Long Island. $50 refundable fee with the latest offerings from Mizuno Titleist and Ping. I’ve been playing Mizuno irons for years. Spent a fair amount of time with the fitter and different head shaft combos from Mizuno and Titleist. Nice but no game changer for me. Fitter put together a G-25 for me and I took one look at the sole and was about to leave. Then I set up. G-25 had a relatively thin top line so I decided to hit the club. About 150 balls later the credit card came out. No one could have made me believe that I would have ever abandoned Mizuno especially for Ping. The GI features are hidden on address and the consistency and flight of the iron is like nothing I’ve ever hit

  3. HAVING READ MOST OF THE COMMENTS ON THE G25S I WOULD LIKE TO ADD WE ALL LIKE TO PLAY OUR BEST WITH CLUBS WE THINK ARE THE BEST I HAVE JUST CHANGED FROM MIZUNO TO THE G25S AND I THINK I NOW HAVE POSSIBLE THE BEST,

  4. what is under the CTP cover on the G25 irons? I’ve read that it may be foam? or is it a solid metal insert?

    thanks

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