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’13 Callaway Razr Fit Xtreme Driver: Pics & Specs

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Callaway Razr Fit Xtreme

To design Callaway’s latest driver, the 2013 Razr Fit Xtreme, company engineers broke down the key ingredients of its most successful drivers models, realigning them with new technology that makes the Razr Fit Xtreme lower spinning, more forgiving and deliver more ball speed than its predecessor, the 2012 Razr Fit driver.

Click here for more discussion in the “Tour/Pre-release equipment” forum.

The Razr Fit Xtreme is also Callaway’s widest ranging driver offering according to Evan Gibbs, manager of performance analysis and club configuration for Callaway. This is because the lower-lofted Razr Fit Xtreme drivers (8.5 degrees, 9.5 degrees and 10.5 degrees) have different performance characteristics than the higher-lofted drivers (11.5 degrees and 13 degrees).

callaway xtreme driver

The OptiFit Hosel adjusts the face angle to an Open, Square, or Closed position at address and the OptiFit Weights (13 grams and 1 gram) also shift the clubhead’s CG to help you play a Draw or Neutral ball flight off the tee.

The lower-lofted Razr Fit Xtreme drivers are modeled after Callaway’s FT Tour drivers, which were extremely popular on the PGA Tour. While the Razr Fit found its way into the bags of many better players and tour players, Callaway received feedback that many preferred the lower-spinning FT Tour drivers to the higher-spinning Razr Fit.

“We took a step back and looked at how each loft was going to be played,” Gibbs said. “We saw that better players wanted a smaller footprint and a more penetrating trajectory, while higher-handicappers wanted larger, more forgiving footprint and more spin for optimum distance.”

In order to lower the spin rate of the Razr Fit Xtreme, Callaway engineers needed to lower the driver’s center of gravity (CG), which they did by removing weight from the driver’s “Forged Composite” crown. Engineers also thinned the perimeter of the “Speed Frame Face” that was used on the Razr Fit driver.

2Y9G4580

This Speed Frame Face creates incredibly fast ball speeds all across the face for longer, more consistent distance.

The thinner face, combined with Callaway’s updated “VFT” and “Hyperbolic Face Technology,” adds more speed to mishits according to Gibbs. The face also has more curvature than in previous Callaway drivers, which helps straighten out off-center strikes.

The weight saved from the face (about 3 grams) was moved to more optimal positions such as the rear toe section of the sole, where it deepens the center of gravity and makes the Razr Fit Xtreme’s adjustable weights more symmetrical, adding stability to the head.

2Y9G4581

 

These changes have resulted in more distance and less spin for Callaway Staffers like Luke List, who led all tours in driving distance in 2012. Gibbs said that during testing List picked up 16.6 yards with the new driver compared to his Razr Fit, adding 0.6 mph of ball speed and reducing his spin rate by almost 500 rpms.

Like the Razr Fit, the Razr Fit Xtreme driver allows golfers to adjust the face angle to one of three settings: neutral, open and closed. But the lower-lofted and higher-lofted models have two very different appearances at address.

The lower-lofted models measure 440cc and have a 1-degree open face angle at the neutral setting. Changing the Opti-Fit Hosel to the open setting on these drivers will open the face another 1.5 degrees, resulting in a face that is 2.5 degrees open at address. If they are adjusted to the closed setting, the face will rest 0.5 degrees closed.

The higher-lofted drivers measure 460cc and are longer heel-to-toe than the lower-lofted versions. This places the sweetspot of the club closer to the hosel, which increases draw bias. The higher-lofted models also sit in a square position when set in neutral, meaning they can be adjusted to either 1.5 degrees open or closed.

On both the lower-lofted and higher lofted drivers, changing to the face angle will also change the loft of the club. The closed setting adds 1 degree of loft to the neutral setting (a 9.5-degree driver becomes a 10.5-degree) while the open setting subtracts 1 degree (a 9.5-degree driver becomes an 8.5-degree). According to Gibbs, Callaway’s testing showed that better players had a tendency to use the Opti-Fit Hosel to adjust loft, while higher handicap players used it to correct a hook or slice.

One of the most important features of the Razr Fit Xtreme drivers to consumers could potentially be the stock shaft offerings. Many OEMs install stripped-down versions of popular shafts in their drivers that have altered characteristics. For Callaway’s newest lineup, the company decided to use an unmodified Aldila Trinity shaft, as well as unmodified Matrix Black Tie7M3 shaft. The Matrix shaft alone carries a $300-plus price tag at retail, making the retail price of the Razr Fit Xtreme, $399, all the more impressive. The Callaway Razr Fit Xtreme drivers will be available at retail on Jan. 18, 2013.

[colored_box color=”grey”]Additional Tech Specs and info:

  • Composite materials such as the Forged Composite that the Razr Fit Xtreme driver uses in its crown have a tendency to mute a driver’s sound and cause a “thud” feeling at impact. According to Gibbs, Callaway engineers worked hard on the acoustics of the Razr Fit Xtreme, making sure it had a “loud and metallic” sound.
  • Callaway received feedback that the 2012 Razr Fit’s swingweight of D6 was too heavy, so the 2013 Razr Fit Xtreme drivers will have a D4 swingweight, which was accomplished by reducing the head weight 5 grams. Standard shaft lengths with be 45.5 inches.
  • The tip diameter of the Opti-Fit Hosel has been changed from 0.350 to 0.335 to match industry trends. Previous Opti-Fit Hosels will fit in the Razr Fit Xtreme drivers, but their 0.350 shafts will not fit in the new Opti-Fit sleeves.
  • A weight kit of 4, 6, 8 and 10 grams will be available to adjust CG and swingweight. No Tour Authentic model is planned at this time, nor is there an Opti-Fit Hosel with more options in the works according to Gibbs.
  • The green color of the Razr Fit was inspired by the popularity of the 2012 Razr Fit Tour Authentic driver, which also has a green color scheme. It also matches the color of the most playable shaft option, the Aldila Trinity.
  • Callaway’s UDesign for the Razr Fit Xtreme driver will launch on Jan. 18 with the driver. Consumers will be able to choose from eight different color options — black, white, blue, red, orange, green, purple and yellow — which can be placed on the sole, crown, or both. Laser etching on the sole will also be available, although pricing is still undetermined. Expect for it to be around $50.[/colored_box]

Check out the shaft specs and photos below, and and click here for more discussion in the “Tour/Pre-release equipment” forum.

Unmodified Aldila Trinity

X Flex 68g, 280cpm, 3.9deg torque, 104mm tip flex. .335″ tip diameter

S Flex 67 g, 269 cpm, 4.5 deg torque, 112mm tip flex,  .335″ tip diameter

R Flex 64 g, 247 cpm, 5.4 deg torque, 124mm tip flex,  .335″ tip diameter

L Flex 63g, 229cpm, 6.3 deg torque, 129mm tip flex,  .335″ tip diameter

Unmodified Matrix Black Tie 7M3

X flex 74g, 265cpm, 4.1deg torque, 85mm tip flex, .335″ tip diameter

S Flex 71g, 253cpm, 4.2 deg torque, 90mm tip flex,  .335″ tip diameter

R Flex 69g, 243cpm, 4.4 deg torque, 93mm tip flex,  .335″ tip diameter

Click here for more discussion in the “Tour/Pre-release equipment” forum.

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26 Comments

26 Comments

  1. Parker

    Sep 14, 2014 at 1:08 am

    Got this thing in June 2014, 10.5 w the Aldila S shaft. HATED it at first, I was playing a TM R10TP w/ a Graffaloy Prolaunch 3.5X at the time. My initial impression was that this thing felt hollow, and I was losing some distance with the lower spin. After hitting this thing all summer, I’m glad to say I was totally wrong. If you have a good driver swing, this thing can really crank the ball. Off center hits are generally forgivable, unless you hit it high on the face, where the ball will launch high with a ton of back spin, and probably slice. Low toe/heel hits definitely go low, but still deliver enough ball speed to get acceptable distance.

    My only complaint is the sound… it sounds like hammering a nail in an empty concert hall… very metallic and echo-y. Nothing like the baseball home run sound I was used to with drivers in the past. The feel is also a tad soft at impact, but don’t let that fool you, this thing delivers a serious punch.

    I’ve found this thing works best with a higher compression ball, but maybe that’s just my preference.

  2. Pingback: On The Aldila Trinity 335 Graphite

  3. Dave

    Sep 9, 2013 at 5:09 pm

    Hit the razr fit xtreme with the 9.5 loft 20 yards further on the simulator than I have hit any other club in my life. I was hitting 260 yards consistently, which I will take everyday of the week. My birthday is next month I’m going back and getting it, Happy Birthday to me!!!

  4. Dustin

    Feb 22, 2013 at 1:13 am

    what is the stock size for the razr fit adapter and hossel? i know for the razr fit xtreme its .335…i was wandering if the razr fit was the same?

  5. Bruce Loman

    Dec 29, 2012 at 12:56 pm

    Most of the comments having to do with the names and looks are comical. Its the fact that the materials are a step ahead of everyone else to build a superior golf club. This started with BIg Bertha and continues today. The incremental steps taken ever couple of years builds a better product. Callaway is always a step ahead with material that outperforms anyone else.

  6. Tay

    Nov 28, 2012 at 2:39 am

    I have hit this driver with the new Trinity shaft. It’s actually really good. But callaway is coming out with a new line of drivers and woods called the Hot series and there basically the same just with a little cheaper price tag. The Hot series is supposed to be a longer club and will be offered in grey.

  7. john

    Nov 27, 2012 at 7:54 am

    the trinity shaft is only in this driver but thats because it isnt even released yet, there will be a mass offering of that shaft eventually. the club is LEGIT looking, i dont understand people that complain about glare, looking down at a bright white head with scuffs all over it is worse looking that this is, for me anyway. plus the udesign you can get all sorts of color combos top and bottom. the distance gained by luke isnt suspect if you have any idea about trackman and how to make it produce huge numbers, hit a low spin draw and itll pump out some huge digits for you, but the point of the club is to make your current ability perform better so his not gaining much speed is exactly the point.

  8. Tommyn

    Nov 20, 2012 at 12:43 pm

    another toy with different packaging let’s see it on the field before running out to buy need more stock ops for shafts

  9. Jordan

    Nov 20, 2012 at 9:18 am

    Does anyone know if the uDesign option comes with a different head cover color? Fit example if white was selected, would white trim be on the hc instead of the green?

  10. Johnny

    Nov 17, 2012 at 2:37 pm

    Well, the marketing from TM always entices me to demo their woods, but they haven’t performed better than the Callaway woods these past few years for me at least. I love my Razr Fit, but look forward to trying this Exreme driver, I like the smaller head size and the new color scheme. I haven’t heard of that Trinity shaft which I will need some more information on. Looks good, hope it hits good.

  11. Joe Golfer

    Nov 16, 2012 at 12:25 am

    The distance increase by Luke List seems suspect to me. It says that ball speed increased only 0.6 mph (less than one mph), which means that his swing speed was roughly only 0.4 mph more, since ball speed is roughly 1.5 times swing speed. And the spin went down only 500 rpm’s. Hard to believe that this equates to over 16 yards increase.
    I’m glad they’re using unmodified shafts such as the Matrix shaft, but the Trinity shaft will be used ONLY in this Callaway club, so that is misleading since Callaway could have had it made to any specs it wants, as it is not a true aftermarket high grade shaft. The torque is quite high in this shaft for a supposedly premium shaft (4.5 in S flex, 5.4 in R flex), and the disparity in flex frequency (cpm’s) is really big between the R and S flex, considering that one flex is typically just 10 cpm’s (like in the Matrix specs), while in this Trinity shaft it is 22 cpm’s difference, which is actually two full flexes+.
    But I do like the look of the club, and the Twitter marketing campaign worked very well.
    I’ve tried prior Callaway drivers with their stock Callaway Aldila Voodoo shaft, but I don’t think it was the true Voodoo aftermarket shaft, and the S flex was quite whippy.

  12. Blanco

    Nov 15, 2012 at 2:54 am

    Not wild about the whole “we know what players/hacks want” line. Why not just release two versions in a variety of lofts instead of forcing certain players into an ego vs. performance decision. Also– the thing looks nice from the top, but I wouldn’t be caught dead what that “ghostbuster barf” green, even if I was Ian Poulter.

  13. mrein

    Nov 15, 2012 at 1:43 am

    What I think really makes a difference are the higher quality shafts the OEM are putting into their Clubs

    • Dustin

      Feb 22, 2013 at 12:03 am

      do you know what the size of the adaptor is of this? just wandering if it is the same at the razr fit from last year

  14. ds

    Nov 14, 2012 at 4:48 pm

    image 1 top left hand coner…Reflection, Reflection, Reflection!!! when are you guys going to get it…go white, the year is 2013! Get Harry and the guru marketing team to talk up how good it is you can see up your own nose at address. Phil will have to get a new TM driver to match his RBZ 3 wood…You dont need a crystal ball to see another Q1 loss for Callaway next year…come on guys you are better that this?

  15. Eric

    Nov 14, 2012 at 2:35 pm

    Would be very surprised if it outperformed my 9* FT-iZ with blueboard; the first Razr fit with stock Kai’li didn’t…

  16. stephen

    Nov 14, 2012 at 2:25 pm

    I am surprised there isn’t a lightweight shaft option, 67 and 71 g in stiff flex. I like the look of the head but with my 101-103mph swing speed I doubt it will be longer for me than my current set up my a 55g shaft

  17. Roger in NZ

    Nov 14, 2012 at 12:19 pm

    Zak, really appreciate the Shafts and CPM ratings.I buy one model old..bought a 910D3 yesterday with
    Regular Kai’li .Great technical analysis of how they designed the Extreme.
    I’m an ex FT IZ owner.No doubt a new R11 is due tomorrow in response, so we all win !

  18. Mat

    Nov 14, 2012 at 12:15 pm

    “Yours free when you buy the Xbox 360 – Halo 4 Edition”

  19. Eric

    Nov 14, 2012 at 11:52 am

    This looks awesome. I can’t wait to get one. I have the Tour Authentic now and Love it. Hopefully the cog is the same so I can use the same shafts I already have.

  20. John

    Nov 14, 2012 at 11:46 am

    I usually never get excited about “New” as the improvements are usually slight and it takes a few years for them to add up enough for me to make a purchase- that said; I want one of these if the shafts work for me.

  21. Lee

    Nov 14, 2012 at 11:45 am

    Different paint, same old hype….. and Luke List picks up another 16.6 yards – yawn! No disrespect to Luke but didn’t see him playing with Rory, Tiger, Phil and co much this past season.

  22. Mr X

    Nov 14, 2012 at 11:18 am

    OK enough with the X-anything anymore and ever again. It is old tired lazy out of touch marketing. If Xtreme is never heard from again nobody would notice. But 8 year olds love it and monster trucks

  23. Brandon Bowen

    Nov 14, 2012 at 9:30 am

    That driver looks crunk. I bet when you smash it. It goes far bro.

    • Ed Bowling

      Feb 3, 2013 at 7:48 pm

      Funny Comments since Phil just nailed the Scottdale….Watch the “same old hype” stuff go strong now….everyone knows more than the guys that do it…….hilarious…..

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Top 5 strokes gained: around-the-greens 2020 and the wedges they used

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#5 Hideki Matusyama (.458% AVG, 27.951 SG) 


Wedges: Cleveland RTX Forged Prototype (52-10, 56-8 @57.5, 60-08 @62)
Shafts: True Temper Dynamic Gold Tour Issue S400

#4 Brandt Snedeker (.514% AVG, 25.685 SG) 

Wedges: Callaway Mack Daddy 4 (52-10S, 56-10S) Vokey SM8 (60K)
Shafts: True Temper Dynamic Gold Tour Issue S400

#3 Aaron Baddeley (.520% AVG, 19.257 SG) 

Wedges: Ping Glide 2.0 (52-12SS), Ping Glide (56-10), Titleist Vokey 260 (60-12, @59)
Shafts: True Temper Dynamic Gold Tour Issue S400

#2 Rob Oppenheim (.536% AVG, 24.106 SG)

Wedges: Ping I210 UW (52) Ping Glide 2.0 Stealth (56-12SS, 60-10SS)
Shafts: Ping ZZ-65

#1 Jason Day (.632% AVG, 25.287 SG AVG) 

Wedges: TaylorMade MG2 Satin (50-09SB, 54-11SB, 60-10SB)
Shafts: True Temper Dynamic Gold Tour Issue S400

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GolfWRX Spotted: Titleist TSi4 on USGA Conforming List

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After all the excitement caused by the Titleist TSi2 and TSi3 driver and fairway woods, it didn’t take long for another Titleist TSi series driver to pop up on the USGA and R&A conforming club lists, and this time it’s the TSi4.

left-handed driver head from USGA list

Based on the entirety of the information provided in the submission, including the fact that it has been submitted both right and left-handed, leaves us to believe that along with the TSi2, and TSi3, which are currently going through the seeding process on the PGA and Korn Ferry Tours, the TSi4 will also be coming to retail in the near future.

If you remember last year in the spring of 2019, Titleist added the line extension of the TS1 and TS4 drivers to cater to further reaches of the fitting bell curve, for players that needed more launch and spin, and for those that needed further reduction respectively.

The line for the TS4 was simple—the smallest and lowest spinning member of the TS family of drivers. It reduced spin by an average of 300-400 RPM compared to the TS2 and TS3 drivers. All of this while also in a player preferred 430cc package. 

To achieve those kinds of dynamics, MOI of the driver’s head has to be sacrificed in favor of creating a low and forward center of gravity to create lower spin. The curious thing with the TSi4 is if Titleist engineers have been able to boost the head size to a full 460 and keep a similar profile or if they have reverted to a sub 460cc design to replicate the TS4’s mass properties and CG location in a new package with new technology to increase ball speed around the head and increase spin robustness.

Time will tell if and when this becomes available at retail, but based on this information, it’s most likely sooner rather than later.

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Wunder: Titleist TSi driver first impressions

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Three things I want to address before I kick this off.

  1. “Better, best” will not be addressed. It’s never about that these days only what works for me or you.
  2. I’m not adding TrackMan data to this for one simple reason: It doesn’t matter to me for a first impression. I can get lost in the data and ultimately it confuses my ability to just enjoy the sound feel and look of the driver. Obviously, the fitting was on TrackMan, but in the past, successful drivers for me started with the emotional part. Simply, do I like the thing? Can I look at it? Can I trust it? Can I hit shots with it? That’s it.
  3. When I say “spin this” and “spin that,” it’s always addressing a positive aspect.

On Tuesday of this week, I had the good fortune of visiting the Titleist Performance Institute (TPI in Oceanside, California) to do my TSi metal woods fitting. Won’t get too far into that, but essentially it’s golf heaven in every sense of the word. Like TaylorMade’s Kingdom or Callaway’s ECPC, TPI it’s a gearhead paradise.

Titleist Master Fitter Joey Saewitz (@thejoeysaewitz on IG) was my fitter and after hitting a few balls to warm up, we dug into my gamer driver that I adore.

Current Gamer Spec

TaylorMade SIM (9 degrees @ 8.5). Fujikura Ventus Black 6X (no tipping) 45 inches, D4, GolfPride BCT 58R

I have been constantly messing with my driver between new shafts, lofts, lie, etc. Since I’ve been playing a bit more this month, I’ve had the chance to work on my swing and the driver has been the last thing to come around. I’m working on decreasing dynamic loft through the bag and have not adjusted my driver to match. The point is, I’m hitting the driver solid but have lost a ton of height and spin to keep it in the air.

I’m saying this now because for key metrics I was at a deficiency because of the craftsman not his tools. The SIM I was fit into was/is excellent. So, as you read on, keep in mind that I knew that numbers-wise apples to apples my setup was vulnerable to getting beat out due to my tinkering.

Thoughts

My average numbers these days are are 105-108 mph swing speed, 155-160 mph ball speed, 14-degree launch, and 1,800-2,000 spin. At 43-years-old, when I’m hitting it solid I get a lot out of my driver. IF I’m swinging well, at my low spin, off days can be nauseating with the driver.

LOOKS

TSi3: If two of my favorite drivers 975D and R7 Superquad TP had a baby, the TSi3 would be it. Its flawless appearance-wise. The heel section gives it an onset look that the faders will love and the top line toe section is a bit rounded off to give it an open look without having to crank it open. Not the first time we have heard that but nonetheless, Titleist nailed it.

The face has a cool matte finish that I can’t get into yet, but it frames a white ball excellently.

TSi2: Like the TS2, it has that high-MOI shape, although I will say the top line and transitions are a bit softer on the eye. It’s a driver that looks like it just wants to go high and far. If I wanted to hit something as hard as I could that’s the shape I would look for.

Side note—the black shafts in the TSi3 are almost too cool to even look at—the closest thing to a Darth Vader golf club I have ever seen.

FEEL/SOUND

This is where they really figured it out. Titleist drivers in the past to my ear sounded good but not great. There was always an essence of ting that I couldn’t fall in love with. The TSi series fixed that in totality, like all the great drivers on the market in 2020 it has that hammerhead thud that I adore. When you crunch it, you literally hear crunch. At impact, however, it has a more compressiony (is that a word?) feel than its competitors. The comparison would be a one-piece forged feel vs a hollow body players iron. Both feel excellent but there is a difference. You can feel the ball squeeze into the face which I think most will notice and respond well to.

PERFORMANCE—Not going to compare it to my gamer as it’s not fair, I gear headed my gamer to the point of lunacy. I will only comment on what the TSi series did while testing.

TSi3: The biggest standout here was usable spin. I am not a high-spin player by any stretch, so if I can find a driver that gets me 2,100-2,200 consistently when I flush it, it’s a contender. For a player at my speed to sneak it out there with the big hitters, I have to launch it at 14 at 1,700 spin, and hope I’m aimed correctly. What I found with the TSi was I was getting that performance at 2,100-2,200, and if anything only giving up 2-3 yards all while doing it 5/10 times as opposed to 2/10.

What does all that jibberish add up to? Consistency and something I can play with. Is it longer than my gamer? I have no idea, but we will find out. What I know is I hit a bunch of really good shots with TSi3, and after I got going with it, it was point and shoot. Stable? Yes. Long? Yes. Forgiving? Yes. Playable? Yes.

TSi2: To be honest I only hit a few with the Tsi2 as its not my genre of music. What I can say is it feels apples to apples with the Tsi3, launches higher with a bit more spin, and goes really straight. No shocker there. The high MOI category has a bunch of contenders, and in my opinion, it’s a head weight game. Heavy is always better for stability.

The setup I landed on

I was fit into the (D4 SureFit setting 9 degrees @ 9.75, flat) however after testing a bit at home on course and range, I landed on the D1 setting, which I like. For whatever reason, I can play Tsi3 at 8.25 and still maintain height spin and it flew about five yards further.

Final setup

Driver: Titleist TSi3 (9 degrees @8.25, D1 SureFit, 44.5 inches, D4 swing weight)

Shaft: Fujikura Ventus Black 6 X (tipped 1)

Overall, the TSi Series drivers will be VERY popular but not for the reasons you would think. It’s playable, you can hit shots with it, that’s the mark of a GREAT golf club. It’s not all ball speeds and carry anymore in my opinion. This is a driver I can go out and play well with, that’s huge for a hack like me. In my experience, I can’t say that about a lot of drivers I’ve tried to make work in the last four to five years. That’s just me. Lots of great drivers every year but I’m a hard case and finding one that’s just right is a challenge.

Ultimately, for me, the best driver on the market is SIM hands down because it performs in the hitting bay and even better on the course—my hunch is Titleist has something that will do the same.

It’s a beautiful driver that I thoroughly enjoyed getting to know.

 

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