With its new F-Max golf clubs, Cobra continues its commitment to slower-speed golfers who need golf clubs that make the game easier. According to the company, the best way to accomplish this is to make the golf clubs weigh less, and to pack them with technologies that help launch the ball higher, straighter and with more speed.

In attempts to further simplify the game for beginning and senior golfers, Cobra is bringing the company’s popular one-length-iron concept — all of the irons in the set measure the same length and have the same lie angle as a 7 iron — to the super game-improvement category with its F-Max One Length irons.

Throughout the F-Max line, Cobra has also made material changes and technological improvements to make the clubs more forgiving and longer than Cobra’s previous Max line. The F-Max line, which includes drivers, fairway woods, hybrids, irons and wedges, will hit stores on August 18th.

Read on for pricing and specs. We break down everything you need to know about the individual offerings below.

F-Max Driver

In order to create a lighter driver — “lighter means easier to hit,” according to Tom Olsavsky, VP of R&D for Cobra — the F-Max drivers are built with Cobra Superlite 50-gram shafts and have reduced swing weights compared to their Max predecessors.

The F-Max drivers also have a forged Ti-6-4 titanium face insert that’s said to create more distance on mishits. For more forgiveness and a higher launch, center of gravity has been shifted more toward the rear and heel of the club, which should help slicers turn the ball over a bit easier. Other changes include a new alignment feature on the crown, a new black PVD finish, and two different hosel options for golfers; an “offset” neck for those who need additional draw bias, and a straight neck for a relatively straighter flight.

“When it comes to the super game-improvement category, it can’t be overstated how important lightweight construction is to this category of player,” Olsavsky said in a press release. “With the creation of F-Max, we have focused on the concept that lighter means easier to hit and we have gone to great lengths to ensure that even our components deliver superiority when it comes to reduced weight.”

The F-Max Drivers are available in 9.5, 10.5 and 11.5-degree lofts and will sell for $299. They come stock with Lamkin Rel 360 midsize grips, which Cobra says will improve comfort and consistency (due to the larger grip size).

F-Max Fairway Woods

Cobra continues its focus on a lightweight construction with the F-Max fairway woods to help golfers hit the ball higher and straighter. With many of the same technologies as the driver — most namely back/heel CG weighting, the crown alignment feature and an offset hosel — the biggest differences include a forged 455 stainless face insert versus a titanium insert in the driver, and a Cobra Superlite 60 shaft, which is 10 grams heavier than the driver shaft.

The F-Max fairway woods will be available in 16-, 20- and 23-degree lofts and will sell for $199. Like the drivers, the woods will also come stock with Lamkin Rel 360 midsize grips.

F-Max Hybrids

Cobra’s F-Max hybrids, which also come with its Superlite 60-gram shaft, are designed to blend with the F-Max drivers and fairway woods due to the similarity in construction, according to Cobra. They will be available in 19-, 22-, 25- and 28-degree lofts and will sell for $179 each.

F-Max Irons

Lighter heads, lighter shafts, lighter swing weights. With its F-Max irons — which Cobra calls the lightest irons in company history — Cobra is sticking with the notion that lighter means easier to hit for golfers with slower swing speeds.

In addition to lighter constructions, the F-Max irons also have deeper undercut designs behind the faces for more flex at impact and greater ball speeds across the face, as well as lower-profile heads to help raise launch. The sets also have a progressive design, meaning the long irons (4-7 iron) are made with 17-4 stainless steel for more distance. The shorter irons (8-PW, GW, SW) are made with 431 stainless steel for more feel.

Like the drivers and woods, the irons also have back/heel weighting to encourage a higher launch and more forgiveness, and they’re built with hosel offset to help golfers reduce a slice.

The F-Max irons, which have nickel chrome plating, will be available for $599 (5-PW, GW) with a True Temper Superlite shaft, and $699 (4H, 5H and 6-PW) with a Cobra Superlite 60 graphite shaft.

F-Max One-Length Irons

Cobra first brought one-length irons to retail after signing Bryson DeChambeau, the face of the one-length movement, to its staff. Cobra currently offers one-length irons in a Tour version that DeChambeau uses, a cavity-back version, a junior version, and now, a super game-improvement version with the new F-Max set. Cobra’s argument is that learning just one swing throughout your iron/wedge set can help simplify the game for golfers.

“We are excited to be the first to bring one-length iron technology to the super game-improvement segment of the market,” Olsavsky says. “Allowing senior and women players the simplicity of having one swing and one set-up for their irons helps make golf a little easier and more fun. And for those players who aren’t quite ready to take the one-length iron plunge, we are confident our new F-Max variable length irons will provide an unmatched level of consistency and accuracy.”

Cobra’s F-Max One-Length irons have the same head constructions and pricing as the F-Max variable-length set, which sell for $599 in steel and $699 in graphite.

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  1. From the article: “Cobra’s F-Max One-Length irons have the same head constructions and pricing as the F-Max variable-length set….”

    How can this be? How could they have the same head constructions in both the VL and SL sets? In order to have a single-length set that works, each head has to weigh the same, have the same lie angle, have the same off-set, have the same MOI, etc. In VL sets, it’s just the opposite, with clubheads changing weight to adjust to each shaft length (in order to maintain swingweight consistency throughout the set).

    Either Cobra’s gone back to the Tommy Armour EQL–not likely–or the article is wrong. “Shank” you very much.

    • No, I think you just misinterpreted what they meany by “same head constructions”. It just means the same material composition and weight distribution. They can have different total weights and lofts/lies.

  2. Those pretty looking Cobra F-Max irons and driver will find their way into my bag. they are outright wicked and will scare the bejesus outta my playing buddies — lololol

    • “Could be possible that single length clubs are ideal for casual/recreational golfers?”

      No, not really. Swingspeed–which correlates strongly to performance–is the key here.

      In variable length sets, slower swingers have trouble maintaining distances in the long irons. This is a key reason we saw a transition from 1-3 irons towards hybrids. Hybrids are easier for slower swingers to get aloft and see decent distances. They have longer shafts, are lighter, and have bigger sweet spots. But….

      This problem oozes over to the single-length arena, only more so. Because each iron is built around a 7- or 8-iron length, the player cannot rely on a longer shaft to produce sufficient swing speed. These irons do account for this by (a) having a higher COR than traditional irons and (b) counting on the player hitting closer to the sweet spot more often (because of the shorter shaft and developed consistency because of the single-length approach).

      So here’s the dilemma: slower swingers can’t (much) benefit from SL irons. And better (faster) players tend not to want to switch from what works for them. I happen to be someone who falls between these concepts.

      I’m a fast swinger (driver at approximately 110mph), but I needed more consistency from my irons. Once I became a better sand player and putter, it remained the thing blocking my improvement. SL irons have done that for me. I’ve been playing them for 7 months (Wishon Sterling) and will never go back. I have a nice set of barely use 2016 Pings in the garage that I haven’t touched since I got the Sterlings back in January.

      I hope OEMs can find a good niche; I’d like to think SL irons have a future. But at age 58, I’m willing to ride these Sterlings out–possibly re-shafting them with graphite when it becomes time. Instead, I hope manufacturers find a way to make this work and continue to improve on the designs (likely in SL clubs with varying shafts). Until then, I’ll enjoy the sheer consistency the Sterlings have brought to my iron game. Awesome.

  3. As one of the “older” golfers I have seen the same thing from my friends. I play an adj. Rocketbalz set at 8.5 and hit the ball higher then all of them. I made the adjustment of teeing the ball VERY high(4 inch tees) and playing it off my front toe. This allows me to hit with an “upward” impact with launches the ball high with just enough spin to maximize carry. I’m slowly convincing my friends to do the same. They all tend to hit down or level and it kills their distance with a driver. In some ways my set up looks “goofy” (according to one friend) but I hit my drives 20-40 yards long than any of my buddies….and I’m older than most of them.

  4. This actually makes sense:

    “• Most rec golfers should only carry a 15-16º loft “thriver” and then something like a 7-wood, a hybrid and then start their iron single length set at the 6-7 iron into the wedges. For the mass of golfers who cannot break 90 a partial set is adequate to play and manage their inconsistent recreational game.”

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