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Fourteen Golf’s new FH-900 Forged irons have mass appeal

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Fourteen Golf’s new FH-900 irons have a compact head shape inspired by feedback from Tour players, but they’re loaded with distance-enhancing technologies to reach a wide range of golfers and ball-striking abilities. Everyone from PGA Tour players (John Rollins currently has them in the bag) to mid-handicappers can play them.

The irons are said to be 7 yards longer than the TC-888 irons (of the same lofts), the irons that they replace in Fourteen’s lineup. They’re forged from S20C carbon steel for a soft feel, and they have a nickel-chrome plating and a back face mirror for a “wow factor” in the bag.

FourteenGolfFH900address

For forgiveness, the cavity of the FH-900 irons is designed to provide stability at impact on off-center hits. For higher ball speeds across the face, the irons have a radial speed channel by way of a thin, 360-degree section surrounding the cavity that increases COR by moving weight to the perimeter of the club head. Like all of Fourteen’s forged iron offerings, the center of gravity in each of the FH-900 irons is individually developed for optimal placement. That means the longer irons have a lower CG to promote higher launch and lower spin, while the short irons have a higher CG to promote trajectory control.

Rusty Estes, the Director of Tour Operations at Fourteen Golf who also does the wedge/iron grinding on Tour for the company, says there is a “vast interest among Tour players, but [the irons] provide enough forgiveness for any mid-capper to play.”

“These are the best irons we’ve ever made, both aesthetically and performance-wise,” Estes says.

FourteenGolfFH900

The soles of the FH-900 irons are built with high camber, or what Estes calls “bull nosing,” a southern term that describes how the club goes into the turf; big and slow, like a bull. These bull-nosed soles support a more downward angle of attack and won’t dig as much as Fourteen’s irons with sharper leading edges.

Specs and Pricing

FH900ironspecsWRX

The stock shaft offering in the FH-900 irons is the Nippon Pro Modus3 105, but custom shafts are also available. Full sets of the irons (4-PW) sell for $1,349.99.

Discussion: See what GolfWRX members are saying about the FH-900 irons

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Andrew Tursky is the Editor-in-Chief of GolfWRX. He played on the Hawaii Pacific University Men's Golf team and earned a Masters degree in Communications. He also played college golf at Rutgers University, where he graduated with a Bachelor of Arts in Journalism.

3 Comments

3 Comments

  1. golfraven

    Jul 2, 2017 at 4:23 am

    The FH-900 irons don’t have as much meet (compared to Bridgestone TourB X-CB) in the back but still sexy appearance. I will add those to the list of contenders for an upgrade. The Modus3 105 is certainly a shaft I am looking at right now.

  2. Grits

    Jul 1, 2017 at 6:27 pm

    so rad —- so wicked —- so pretty

  3. Paul

    Jul 1, 2017 at 8:03 am

    Hit these a few weeks ago. They really are lovely irons; setup and looks are top notch. The feel is very soft, yet solid. I hit them against the 888 and 770. The shaft wasn’t the shaft for me, but the distance over the 888 is easily seen from the range. Would have loved some on course time with them too. In the end, my 745s performed very similarly but if I were hunting for a new iron, I would put a lot of weight behind the 900.

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Danny Willett’s Winning WITB: DP World Tour Championship

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Driver: Callaway Rogue (9 degrees)
Shaft: Mitsubishi Diamana W 60x

3-wood: Callaway Rogue Fairway Wood (15 degrees)
Shaft: Mitsubishi Diamana W 70X

Irons: Callaway X Forged Utility Irons (18, 21, 24 degrees), Callaway X Forged 18 Irons (5-9)
Shafts: True Temper Dynamic Gold X100 Superlite

Wedges: Callaway Mack Daddy Forged PW (48 degrees), Callaway Mack Daddy 4 Wedges (54, 58 degrees)
Shafts: True Temper Dynamic Gold

Putter: Odyssey Prototype (Stroke Lab)

Ball: Chrome Soft X

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Club Building 101: Counterbalancing golf clubs

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Counterbalancing can take many forms, from higher balance point shafts, to heavier grips. This video explains how this relates to club building, along with the benefits of counterbalancing from both a player and design perspective.

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Callaway redesigns Odyssey R-Ball Prototype using GE’s additive manufacturing

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Callaway has announced the company has signed a consultancy agreement with GE Additive’s AddWorks team, with the aim of improving its equipment through the potential of additive manufacturing. According to GE Additive’s website, additive manufacturing is a process that creates a physical object from digital design, enabling the creation of lighter, stronger parts and systems.

What does this mean for Callaway’s equipment?

The opening project from the agreement is a redesigned Odyssey R-Ball Prototype putter head. Callaway originally developed the Odyssey R-Ball Prototype as a tour preferred model in Japan, which consisted of removing the front ball from the original 2-ball design. Callaway, through additive manufacturing, has optimized the acoustics of the putter while retaining the preferred shape and performance.

 

Brad Rice, director – R&D, Advanced Engineering at Callaway, speaking about the process, stressed that the use of additive manufacturing is the future to the production of equipment in the game of golf, stating

“Additive manufacturing is a new tool; which is quickly going beyond the aspirational phase, and into the functionalization phase of the technology. Callaway needs to learn how to use this tool well because it is inevitable that 3D-Printing of production parts is going to happen – it is the production method of the future.”

So just how has Callaway and GE Additive collaborated to create the ideal acoustics on the Odyssey R-Ball Prototype putter head? Well, the answer is by adding geometry that made it difficult for conventional casting methods, which you can get a feel for in this short video.

For the Odyssey Prototype putter to retain its optimal design and shape while altering the acoustic signature of the putter head, Callaway and GE Additive’s AddWorks’ design and engineering teams implemented additive manufacturing through the following process:

  •  AddWorks provided guidance to Callaway, based on decades of additive design background spanning several industries.
  •  The team refined existing designs to the build direction to ensure all features were self-supported or easily supported during the build. The AddWorks team designed supports for thermal stresses and overhang constraints.
  •  Topology optimization was used in conjunction with acoustical mapping to create the optimal design.

According to GE Additive AddWorks general manager, Chris Schuppe, additive manufacturing is a method which we are going to be hearing of a lot down the line, and he is expecting this to be the first of many collaborations with Callaway

“We’re taking away many new learnings from our first project together, especially around aesthetics. We have also used additive technology to create an acoustic map, which is certainly a first for us. We’re looking forward to driving more successful projects with Callaway, as they continue their additive journey.”

What the future holds for Callaway’s products through the use of additive manufacturing remains to be seen. However, the company’s bold stance on the potential of the process enhancing their equipment could be telling.

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