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12 Important Changes to the 2017 TaylorMade M1 and M2 Drivers

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TaylorMade’s 2017 M1 and M2 drivers share the same name as their highly rated predecessors, but they’re very different clubs both inside and out. Here’s a list of 12 important changes TaylorMade made to the 2017 M1 and M2 drivers, which will be in stores Jan. 27, 2017.

1) A Lighter Core

TaylorMade_M1_M2_Drivers_Feat_2

Each of TaylorMade’s 2017 drivers (M1 460, M1 440, M2 and M2 D-Type) use 9-1-1 titanium alloy cores. The lower-density material saves 3 grams of weight from the design, creating a lighter “skeleton” that paved the way for specialized changes to each new driver model.

Before the release of the 2016 M1 and M2 drivers, which were TaylorMade’s first to use carbon fiber crowns to move weight lower and deeper in the club head, the company made its driver crowns from 9-1-1 titanium alloy, so TaylorMade has experience using the material. TaylorMade previously used a higher-density 6-4 titanium alloy to create the skeletons of its original M1 and M2 drivers.

2) Bigger Club Heads

TaylorMade_M1_M2_drivers_address

Both the 2017 M1 and M2 drivers use size to their advantage. Their toe sections are recessed, or pushed in, which allowed designers to expand the footprint of the drivers while still complying with the USGA’s maximum allowable club head size of 460 cubic centimeter. The new geometries improved the moment of inertia (MOI) of the club heads to 4420 grams-centimeters squared in the M1 460 and 5020 grams-centimeters squared in the M2.

  • The M1’s footprint is 4 percent larger.
  • The M2’s footprint is 2 percent larger, and the club face is 7 percent larger.

Essentially, TaylorMade’s 2017 M1 460 driver is as forgiving as the 2016 M2, and the 2017 M2 is the most forgiving driver model in company history, TaylorMade says.

3) More Carbon Fiber

M1_multi_material_driver

The new M1 uses 43 percent more carbon fiber than its predecessor, expanding the use of the material to the toe section of the club. The carbon fiber crown itself is also 10 percent thinner, and is constructed from six layers of carbon fiber instead of the seven layers that were used to create the 2016 M1 and M2 drivers.

Because of the lighter toe section, TaylorMade was able to move its T-Track, the M1’s sliding weight system, closer to the toe area of the sole where the driver is longer from front to back, enabling the track to be lengthened by 12.7 millimeters. The 19-percent longer track allows golfers to move the sliding weight more rearward, a change that enhances forgiveness and can create a higher launch angle.

The heel-toe sliding weight track is also 7 percent longer than the one employed on the 2016 M1 460 driver, allowing for further draw/fade bias control.

4) FF2FF: A More Refined Crown

FF2FF_M1_address

TaylorMade’s new carbon fiber crown has a thickness of 0.6 millimeters, lowering the center of gravity (CG) of the drivers, and is more precisely applied to each driver head. Instead of club heads and crowns being manufactured in bulk, each club head and crown is perfectly matched to each other ensure a perfect fit and reduce the amount of adhesive needed to secure the two parts.

The 2016 M1 and M2 drivers had crown thicknesses of 0.7 millimeters, and used several layers of paint to create the black-and-white alignment aid on the top of the driver head. The 2017 models use less paint. It sounds counterintuitive, but reducing the amount of paint makes the crowns less likely to chip. Think about what happens when paint is applied too thickly to a surface.

5) A Heavier Sliding Weight

M1_driver_T_track

TaylorMade’s 2017 M1 driver uses a 15-gram weight in its heel-toe weight track, and a 12-gram weight in its front-back weight track. The 12-gram front-back weight is 2.5 grams heavier than the weight used in the original M1 driver, giving golfers more control over launch conditions.

6) A New Loft Sleeve

Aluminum_loft_sleeve

Both the 2017 M1 and M2 drivers use a new aluminum loft sleeve, which is the same weight as the plastic loft sleeves the company used previously. The switch to aluminum makes the loft sleeves more durable for club fitters, while remaining backwards compatible with previous loft sleeves.

7) A Draw-Biased M2

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Discussions TaylorMade had with its retail accounts revealed that a driver model with more draw bias could offer a subset of golfers better performance than the existing M1 and M2 models. For them, TaylorMade designed the M2 D-Type, which is different than the 2017 M2 driver in four ways:

  1. It has a 1-degree more upright lie angle.
  2. It has more weight located in the heel portion of the driver head.
  3. It has a more “forward” hosel, which adds offset to the driver.
  4. Its carbon fiber crown has a thicker white section that’s curved to make the club face appear square at address.

The combined changes help golfers return the driver to impact in a more closed position than the 2017 M1 460, M1 440 and M2 drivers. According to TaylorMade, the M2 D-Type will launch shots with about 250 rpm more spin and produce 12 yards more draw bias.

8) A Little More Draw Bias for Everyone

M2_Draw_Bias

The M1 460, M1 440 and M2 drivers have slightly more draw bias than previous models. According to TaylorMade, the 2017 M1 460 and M1 440 offer about 1-2 yards more draw bias. The 2017 M2 offers a few more yards of draw bias than that.

9) A More Active Speed Pocket

M2_Speed_Pocket

The 2017 M2 driver has a more rearward CG that tends to cause drives to fly with excessive spin. To reduce it, TaylorMade made the M2’s Speed Pocket, a slot located on the front of the driver’s sole, three times more flexible than the original model. It also helps improve ball speed on off-center hits, a phenomenon known as “effective MOI.”

10) The M1 440

TaylorMade_M1_440_460_Sole

TaylorMade M1 440 (left) and M1 460 drivers.

The M1 440 is designed for golfers who prefer a smaller, more workable driver than the M1 460. It’s said to hit drives with approximately the same launch angle and spin rate as the M1 460, but initial testing proved that it can reduce spin by several hundred rotations per minute.

The smaller size of the M1 440 allowed TaylorMade to increase the weight in the front-back weight track of the driver to 15 grams, making each of its T-Track weights 15 grams.

11) Geocoustic

M2_Geocustic

Like the 2017 M1 460 and M1 440 drivers, the new M2 driver uses a “sunken sole curvature,” which allowed the driver head to be made larger. It also made the toe section of the driver stiffer, allowing engineers to use fewer “ribs” inside the driver head, saving weight from the design. Instead, TaylorMade added ribs to the outside of the driver head, where it could move CG lower and deeper in the club head and improve sound in the process.

12) New Stock Shafts

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TaylorMade’s 2017 M1 460 and M1 440 drivers are available with three stock shafts:

  • High-Launch: Fujikura XLR8 Pro 56 (A, R, S flexes)
  • Mid-Launch: MRC Kuro Kage Silver Dual Core TiNi 60 (R, S, X flexes)
  • Low-Launch: Project X HZRDUS Yellow 65 (6.0, 6.5 flexes)

The 2017 M2 and M2 D-Type are available with two different stock shafts:

  • M2: Fujikura Pro XLR8 56 (A, R, S, X flexes)
  • M2 D-Type: Matrix’ OZIK MFS X5 (A, R S flexes)

All four drivers are can be purchased with 30+ custom shaft options for no added cost. Learn more by visiting TaylorMade’s Custom Shop website.

Available Lofts

  • M1 460 (8.5, 9.5, 10.5 and 12 degrees)
  • M1 440 (8.5, 9.5 and 10.5 degrees),
  • M2 and M2 D-Type (9.5, 10.5 and 12)

The M1 460 and M2 drivers are available in lofts of 9.5 and 10.5 degrees for left-handed golfers.

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Zak is the Editor-in-Chief of GolfWRX.com. He's been a part of the company since 2011, when he was hired to lead GolfWRX's Editorial Department. Zak developed GolfWRX's Featured Writer Program, which supports aspiring writers and golf industry professionals. He played college golf at the University of Richmond (Go Spiders!) and still likes to compete in tournaments. You can follow Zak on Twitter @ZakKoz, where he's happy to discuss his game and all the cool stuff that's part of his job.

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34 Comments

34 Comments

  1. Jesse Harris

    Oct 29, 2017 at 4:18 pm

    I just finished at my fitters , my swing speed is 118-123 mph , hit all the clubs, stock are all set up for an average player, high swing speed are going to produce a slice every driver head was very close, the shaft is what will get you into that 1.5 smash factor and what I found was the m1 and a Fuji speeder x stiff tour , 320 carry with a 1.52 smash factor was the best for me , I loved the feel and sound bombs away

  2. BP

    Feb 20, 2017 at 12:52 pm

    Will 2017 m1 adapter fit into 2016 m1 head?

  3. BP

    Feb 20, 2017 at 12:51 pm

    Will the new 2017 m1 adapter fit in to a 2016 m1 head?

  4. Square

    Dec 9, 2016 at 6:51 am

    I liked TM products years ago and then fell out of love during the R11-R1 season. The SLDR was the worst of the worst. Decided to try the M1 for kicks following a layoff after hand surgery. My numbers were sick with the M1. Purchased it last spring and after about 10 sessions at the range, experimenting with different settings and weight setting, I finally dialed it in. Truthfully, it’s the best driver I’ve ever had for me. I’ve hit some really long drives with it, but I like the consistency I get from the M1. I have the m1 3 wood too and it’s a freak show. I’ll give this one a whirl and compare the numbers but I can’t really see how they could make it better.

  5. KK

    Dec 8, 2016 at 11:45 pm

    M2 having a larger face and being most forgiving TM driver ever is very interesting. But that is likely bad for spin reduction.

  6. Speedy

    Dec 8, 2016 at 9:00 pm

    I’m dormant toward new ‘n improved claims, not to mention prices. $149 seems fair.

  7. Larry Fox

    Dec 8, 2016 at 6:01 pm

    I’m still hitting an r5!!!! Whats the big deal!

  8. BS Caller

    Dec 8, 2016 at 2:46 pm

    Biggest change is that Tiger is on the other end… To me these look like a black and white wing tip shoe….

  9. Et

    Dec 8, 2016 at 2:25 am

    We live in exciting times

  10. John Krug

    Dec 7, 2016 at 7:48 pm

    Waiting for the M3.

  11. Buford T Justice

    Dec 7, 2016 at 2:05 pm

    “The 12-gram front-back weight is 2.5 grams heavier than the 10-gram weight used in the original M1 driver”

    Math is hard.

  12. Smizzly

    Dec 7, 2016 at 11:35 am

    Golfwrx is in on the scam now…….

  13. Branson Reynolds

    Dec 7, 2016 at 10:55 am

    Doesn’t matter if they test like crap. GS Hot List is still gonna give them gold medals and 5 stars!

  14. Branson Reynolds

    Dec 7, 2016 at 10:53 am

    I can’t believe adidas wants to get rid of TM so badly. It’s not like they over-saturate or anything.

  15. TigerArmy

    Dec 7, 2016 at 4:38 am

    The Taylormade M1 and M2 reviews of Rick Shiels were a complete disaster compared to the 2015/16 models. Mark Crossfield didn’t get any clubs to review for dubious reasons. Taylormade has a lot to explain!

    • Leon

      Dec 7, 2016 at 10:30 am

      Hit the nail!! The 2017 M1 and M2 seem sound worse, feel worse, look worse, and perform worse. 12 important changes = a sucker club

    • Ben

      Dec 7, 2016 at 10:41 am

      Nothing to explain, Crossfield is unprofessional. About time IMO.

    • Brian

      Dec 7, 2016 at 3:23 pm

      Don’t know if it’s the club heads or Rick’s swing changes. I went back and re-watched his M1 reviews and he was getting 5mph more speed (116 vs. 111) with the original M1 model.

      I don’t care either way. I have the original M1, which is the best driver I’ve ever hit, and I won’t be changing any time soon.

  16. Cris

    Dec 7, 2016 at 2:10 am

    Why more draw bias across the spectrum? That’s a poor decision. Leave the draw bias in one of your products only. Gees.

  17. Tim

    Dec 7, 2016 at 12:52 am

    All kinds of bells and whistles on this new 2017 model…cool, oh but in 2018 it will still be obsolete…and guys that have a 15 handicap will still have a 15 handicap only be $400 lighter in the wallet….

    • Tony Rich

      Dec 7, 2016 at 1:54 am

      Agreed…..more draw bias when their clubs already duck hook? Tiger could’ve saved himself 6 strokes in the desert without the pull hook from his TM last week. These guys love to market their new driver…every 3 months.

      • Ummmm

        Dec 7, 2016 at 7:50 am

        Are people really still saying this crap?

        They haven’t had a new driver in a year and any pro can have any bia they want hotmelted away or added. Tiger hasn’t hit a driver straight in 10 years it’s not the clubs fault.

        Try educating yourself so you don’t look like a fool.

        • Tony Rich

          Dec 7, 2016 at 7:47 pm

          Ummmmm……go buy one then. You must be the guy who bought the M1 and M2 in 2016. M2, R15, RBZ, they all go the same distance and are just as crooked. Taylor Made should change their name to Waste Ur Pay.

      • Leon

        Dec 7, 2016 at 10:32 am

        Totally agreed. The M2 is just so easy to hook or pull the ball. But since 80% guys are fighting the slice, so you will rarely see anyone complain the hook.

      • Brian

        Dec 7, 2016 at 5:04 pm

        If you’re hitting duck hooks, you might want to take a lesson or two. Clubs don’t hit duck hooks, swings do.

  18. Boobsy McKiss

    Dec 7, 2016 at 12:37 am

    Some good looking drivers. Am curious just how much more forgiving the newer M2 is compared with last year, all other things aside.

  19. Jack

    Dec 6, 2016 at 9:13 pm

    No comments? Maybe cuz the webpage crashes when it’s trying to load. Does that on both my Chrome and Edge browsers. I had to stop the loading right after the text loads.

    • Frosty

      Dec 6, 2016 at 9:45 pm

      You should stop using a Windoze PC from 1998 with OS 4. Go make some money and buy yourself a real computer lmao

    • Rob

      Dec 7, 2016 at 9:32 am

      Simple fix…go upstairs tell your mom to reset the internet. Unplug…count to 10…plug back in. Then sit back and enjoy the comments!

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pga tour

Andrew “Beef” Johnston WITB 2017

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Equipment is accurate as of the 2017 RSM Classic (11/14/17).

Driver: Titleist 917D2 (9.5 Degrees)
Shaft: Mitsubishi Tensei Orange 70TX

3 Wood: Titleist 917F3 (15 Degrees)
Shaft: Mitsubishi Tensei Orange 80TX

Hybrids: Titleist 816 H2 (19 Degrees)
Shafts: Mitsubishi Kuro Kage 90HY TX

Driving Irons: Titleist 718 T-MB 2 & 3 Iron (17 & 20 Degrees)
Shaft: True Temper Dynamic Gold X100 Tour Issue

Irons: Titleist 718 MB (3-9)
Shaft: True Temper Dynamic Gold X100 Tour Issue

Wedges: Titleist Vokey SM7 (46-10F, 50-08F, 54-10S)
Shaft: True Temper Dynamic Gold S400 Tour Issue

Putter: Scotty Cameron Circle T Super Rat I GSS Inlay
Grip: Scotty Cameron Standard Pistol

Putter: Scotty Cameron Circle T Newport 2
Grip: Scotty Cameron Standard Cord Pistol

Putter: Scotty Cameron Circle T Super Rat II GSS Inlay
Grip: Scotty Cameron Standard Cord Pistol

WITB Notes: Beef was testing a variety of putters ahead of The RSM Classic. We will update this post when his choice is confirmed. 

Related:

Discussion: See what GolfWRX members are saying about Beef’s clubs. 

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Equipment

The hottest blade irons in golf right now

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As we’ve written before, the decision to put a new driver in the bag is usually obvious. Better numbers at testing, perceptibly longer distance, and as long as your bank account allows, you have your new gamer.

The iron switch, however, is a trickier beast. Comfort with the variety of shots one needs to hit is key. Confidence from one’s long irons through the higher lofts is critical. Thus, even the greatest enthusiasm for a new iron release isn’t always followed by a mass exodus to gaming said irons. This is doubly true at the professional level, where the tools are critical to a player’s livelihood.

That said, the combination of forum chatter, GolfWRX member enthusiasm, and what we’re spotting in our WITB photos from tour stops are a reliable indicator of the hottest irons in the game.

And judging by the response to our recent Instagram post, we’re confident that these four models are the hottest blade irons in golf right now.

Callaway Apex MB

Buzz built steadily for the Apex MB iron when we first spotted them in Tour players’ bags at the beginning of 2017. The irons are the product of direct feedback from the company’s Tour staffers, according to Luke Williams, Director of Product and Brand Management at Callaway. Forged from 1025 Carbon Steel, these irons have the shortest blade lengths, the thinnest soles and the smallest overall heads in the vast line of Callaway irons. They’re designed for maximum workability, and for tour-desired turf interaction.

Related: Callaway (finally) launches new Apex MB and X Forged irons

Mizuno MP-18

The pioneers of Grain-Flow Forging, Mizuno went back to its roots with the MP-18 iron model. A throwback to the great muscle backs in the company’s history, Mizuno was shooting for the look of an iron that could have been forged a century ago. Shorter blade length, cambered top line, sharp, compact wedges, all combined with the most minimal badging make the MP-18 an instant classic that set the GolfWRX forums afire.

Related: Mizuno brings the MP family closer together

TaylorMade P730

TMag’s P730, particularly in its prototype incarnations, made quite a splash on the PGA Tour. Building on the heritage of the TP-MB irons, P730 was developed in collaboration with the very best players in the world. The 1025 carbon steel irons irons feature a smaller profile and crisper lines than the MB series irons. The combination of the clean look and a deep rear groove have players drooling. Discussing working with Dustin Johnson and Justin Rose to design the P730, TMag’s Senior Director of Irons, Tomo Bystedt said, “What these players need is a very low-inertia club that they can [manipulate] easily, almost like a surgeon’s scalpel.” Behold the scalpel.

Related: Taylormade expands forged offerings with P730 and P790

Titleist 718 MB

“For the purist there is no substitute for a one-piece, muscle back iron. The 718 MB is the modern choice for those desiring a traditional forged look and feel,” says Titleist in the 718 MB marketing materials.

It’s hard to argue with that statement from the “appearance of a classic forged iron” standpoint. Purists appreciate that the 718 MB maintains Titleist’s traditional lofts (the 6-iron is 31 degrees, the pitching-wedge is 47 degrees), thin top-line, minimal offset, and limited badging. In short, if it ain’t broke…

Related: Titleist’s 718 irons offer endless possibilities.

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Whats in the Bag

Austin Cook’s Winning WITB: The 2017 RSM Classic

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Driver: Ping G400 LST (8.5 Degrees)
Shaft: Fujikura Speeder 661 Evolution TX-Flex

3 Wood: Ping G400 Stretch (13 Degrees)
Shaft: Fujifuke Motore Speeder VC 7.2 TX-Flex

Hybrid: Ping G400 3 Hybrid (19 Degrees)
Shaft: Matrix Ozik Altus Tour H8 91X

Hybrid: Ping G400 4 Hybrid (22 Degrees)
Shaft: Matrix Ozik Altus Tour H8 91 X

Irons: Ping S55 Orange Dot (5-PW)
Shafts: KBS Tour S-Flex

Wedges: Ping Glide 2.0 SS (50-12, 56-12), Ping Glide 2.0 WS (60)
Shaft: True Temper Dynamic Gold S400 Tour Issue

Putter: Ping Sigma G Tyne 
Grip: SuperStroke Mid-Slim 2.0

Golf Ball: Titleist Pro V1

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