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Nike 20XI / 20XI-X Balls

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Review by GolfWRX writer: PhilsRHman

I received a dozen 20XI-S and 20XI-X balls with the understanding I would post my thoughts here. Thanks to GolfWRX and Nike for the chance to hit these balls and for getting product into the hands of the site’s users to weigh in.

Click here to read the discussion in the forums

About me:
I’ve been hovering in the upper single digits for the past two years, but have played quite a bit this season and have dipped down to a 4.8 this summer. I’ve always looked for a performance ball at a bargain. Last year that meant the Wilson Staff FG Tour and this year it’s meant the Srixon ZStar-X. If I had my choice of any ball, it would be a Pro V-1x. I’m a very high launch, high spin player, which was proven to be true on two recent Trackman sessions at HotStix in Rye Brook, NY. My driver swing speed at my last session was 114-118 and my big issue is that my angle of attack is around 3-4*, which puts an awful lot of spin on the ball.

I’ll admit at the start, I really didn’t think I’d be able to tell the difference between one premium ball and another, but I guess the fact I’m playing a lot, and playing pretty well, combined with the fact I’ve played almost entirely with the Z Star-X this summer, and I could see very obvious differences.

I’ve noticed a lot of the other guys broke down the ball by segments, so I’ll do the same. However, I’ll rank them in order of noticeable difference.

1. Iron spin: Unfortunately, both the S and X proved to have uncontrollable spin on full shots to the greens for me. With a Pro V or Z Star, a long iron would hit and release 6-10 feet. A 7-9 iron would hit and stop and a wedge would back up 3-6 feet. Very predictable. However, over the past few rounds, I’ve been unable to control the spin on either the S or the X. At first I thought it was just the S, but today proved that the X is as tough to gauge. A long iron (5-6 iron) would hit and stop, maybe even back up 3 feet. A 7-9 iron would back up 10-12 feet, and a wedge would suck back off the green. I saw examples of a 8 iron with a X sucking back 15-20 feet off the front, as well as a 51* wedge that hit on the back of green and zipped back to the front edge (about 45 feet) although that was an S. To me, this is where the review begins and ends for me. Keep in mind, these aren’t on Augusta type greens, they’re on putting surfaces slowed down to avoid losing the greens in the Northeast heat. While the spin once the ball lands was an issue, I didn’t see much evidence of this ball ballooning into the wind, however my draw often turned from a 5-yard draw to missing the green to the left. In the past, this would be the case when I’d deloft the club at impact, which wouldn’t be the ball’s fault, but here I’d be missing pin high, which tells me it’s excess spin.

2. Green side spin: As you’d imagine, I saw some great hop and stop results with both the 20XI S and X, more so with the S. This is definitely a plus for these two balls, because the spin around the greens is consistent and if you practice enough with them I’m sure you can really dial in your chips and hop-hop-stop shots. I particularly noticed that the X performed especially well out of bunkers. Personally, I would prefer the X’s green side spin, because it’s not quite as aggressive and I found that the S had the habit of really sticking on the first hop, but again, that’s personal preference and I prefer to play a low bump-run whenever possible when just off the edge.

Click here to read the discussion in the forums

3. Driver: Here is probably my favorite part of the 20XI X. I loved driving this ball, it was very easy to work, but I never found myself losing it in either direction. I normally fight a big hook or a block right, depending on the day. The Z Star X must have quite a low driver spin because I can’t work it as comfortably as the 20XI X, so when I really have to work it, I go overboard and lose it. The 20XI X allowed me to hit subtle draws and fades. I think it’s that comfort that allowed me to also bomb away. I found the 20XI X to be consistently longer than the Z Star X, which seems counter-intuitive but proved out over numerous rounds. I put the 20XI X into some positions that I haven’t seen all season at my home course. With all that said about the 20XI X, I really don’t have any good conclusions about the 20XI S in terms of driver, but I do know that I lost several of them into the woods, so I’d say that the extra spin meant I hit them extra wild. I wouldn’t take that as gospel, however, as I sit here writing, I just never got a clearly defined sense of the S off the tee. It was OK, nothing really stood out.

4. Durability:
Here’s a real asset of this ball. Sure, a well struck 100 yard shot with a non-conforming wedge will scuff, just like any premium ball. But the cover doesn’t fish gill the way some do and I would give this ball an A for endurance. Nothing longer than a PW marked up the ball, and never grated it on anything but a full wedge.

5. Feel: I know that people put so much stock in how a ball feels off the putter and off irons. I honestly never think about it, until reading a few other reviews and thinking, hmm, yeah, I guess I did notice that. Well, in terms of the S, I did find it to be soft, but not mushy (I thought the previous generation Callaway balls were very mushy). On the D, I also found it to be soft, but maybe a little more solid, if that makes sense. I guess I’d say they are both very comparable to the Z Star X since I didn’t notice much difference between any of the three. I did notice, however, that while switching between the three balls during today’s round (the final test round of about four weeks of playing them all), I couldn’t get the speed of the greens at all. I thought I just putted like a butthead, but then read another review of someone who couldn’t find green speed with the 20XI balls, so maybe I’ve got an excuse. However, yesterday I made 3 birdies in 9 holes with the X, so I can’t really blame the ball. One thing I will say, is that I dug a Pro V1x out of my bag for something yesterday and the feel was MUCH different. The Pro V had a much “deeper” feel at impact if that makes sense. Not firm or soft, just more substantial. I can’t really put it into words, just sort of the same way a really pure iron shot just feels great.

Conclusion:
For me, the 20XI X does a lot of things very well, specifically its performance off the driver and its durability. But it’s very hard for me to keep a ball in play when I’m consistently frustrated with a good iron shot that ends up way short. It’s something I could adjust to I’m sure, and maybe if I was playing firmer conditions I’d welcome that extra iron spin. I also know that won’t be an issue for other players, and I think there are enough advantages to heartily suggest giving these balls a try. As for the S, I honestly don’t think it’s the right ball for my game, but in the right hands I think it’ll be a good fit.

Click here to read the discussion in the forums

With the arrival of the new groove regulations it is no surprise that companies like Nike have invested heavily in new ball technologies. The new 20X1(pronounced twenty-x-i) is the result of the combined efforts of Nike’s golf ball engineers and scientists at Dupont (makers of Kevlar and Teflon) to produce a ball that goes further with more control. Essentially they have made a high MOI ball with a more active core and a softer cover. There are two versions: a more distance orientated 20XI-X and the higher spinning  20XI-S.

The Nike balls also have a resin core than is supposed to produce a faster ball speed and a steeper spin slope that sees less spin off the driver and more off the wedge. Moment Of Inertia was the buzz word in the driver world a little while ago but this sees Nike join Callaway’s Tour i(s) and Tour i(z) by creating a ball with perimeter weighting. Not only is this supposed to produce straighter ball flight but it also means that more of the spin is preserved throughout the ball’s flight. This means it can leave the club face with less spin for more distance but also (and somewhat counter-intuitively) land was more spin than a previous generation golf ball.

All this would amount to pretty much the holy grail of golf balls – a longer, straighter golf ball that is easier to control and stop dead when you need it. So long as putting is unaffected this sounds like it could be phenomenal.

Availability is yet to be announced and as always, more information will be found at www.nike.com.

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GolfWRX is the world's largest and best online golf community. Expert editorial reviews, breaking golf tour and industry news, what to play, how to play and where to play. GolfWRX surrounds consumers throughout the buying, learning and enrichment process from original photographic and video content, to peer to peer advice and camaraderie, to technical how-tos, and more. As the largest online golf community we continue to protect the purity of our members opinions and the platform to voice them. We want to protect the interests of golfers by providing an unbiased platform to feel proud to contribute to for years to come. You can follow GolfWRX on Twitter @GolfWRX and on Facebook.

9 Comments

9 Comments

  1. Roger Ackerman

    Mar 29, 2014 at 10:56 pm

    Hi just got a Hole in one on a par 3. 136 yards with a Nike RZN X . This was at Peninsula Gulf Club Gulf Shores ,Al . They sent a Great Commemorative wall plaque with a picture of the hole,yardage, date, club. Not a thing about the ball. Do you have a way to mount the Ball . So I can Display it by by we’re it should be. After all the Ball made the hole in One . Roger Ackerman. ( my first hole in one )

  2. Nick

    Aug 20, 2013 at 4:27 pm

    Just bought the 20xi-x. I normally play with the prov1x, but I’m looking for a good ball with a smaller price tag. I have a chipping green in my back yard and tried these out chipping against prov1x. The nike feels like a Slazenger raw distance off the 56* and the putter. Awful feel, hopefully I see results with it on the course.

  3. Terry

    Sep 12, 2012 at 2:01 pm

    20xi-x is the worst ball I have played this summer. My swing speed is 95mph for the driver but the ball feels hard off every club including the putter and my distance much shorter and its durability is less than the pro-v, bridgestone, or sixron ball. No wonder they were half price, poor purchase even at $24.

  4. Levi

    Jul 15, 2012 at 5:51 pm

    I’ve tried the 20xi ball and thought it was terrible ball it
    felt terrible around the green and especially with the putter!

  5. gticlay

    May 3, 2012 at 10:03 am

    @Martin – are you using conforming groove clubs or square groove from the pre-conforming days? I ask because this ball must be made to spin properly with the conforming grooves and if you play a ball made to spin with CC and use square grooves, you’ll end up doing what you did. So just curious what you are using.

    thanks!

  6. Pingback: Nike 20XI / 20XI-X Balls | Augusta Blog

  7. Jay

    Apr 30, 2012 at 6:25 pm

    It’s only April and this guy is talking about summer? So you tested this ball in the summer of last year?

  8. JaxBeachNole

    Apr 30, 2012 at 5:56 pm

    ” I love in NE Florida,” I do love typically in NE Florida, but meant live. My apologies.

  9. JaxBeachNole

    Apr 30, 2012 at 5:54 pm

    Great review. I play the X as well as some leftover Tour One Ds and think it’s as good as any ball out there.

    I disagree, however, with the level of spin around the greens. I have found that the X doesn’t zip as much as the current ProV1x. I love in NE Florida and play firmer greens typically but felt that on pitches the 20XI-X rolls out a little more than the ProV1x.

    It is the ball in my bag though and I am happy to see a positive review.

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19th Hole

Puma launches new X Collection that Rickie Fowler will debut at this week’s Open Championship

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Puma Golf has launched its new X Collection which is inspired in part by the celebration of Rickie Fowler’s 10-year partnership with the company. Fowler will debut the collection this week at the 148th Open Championship in Royal Portrush.

The collection features traditional fabrics and patterns of the British Isles, incorporating houndstooth detailing and a navy, green and white color palette that pays homage to the region where golf was born.

“Rickie’s style has evolved over the years, starting various fashionable trends in on course wear by blending influences from streetwear and modern fashion. Today, his style reflects both a maturation in his game and personal confidence, and the X Collection was designed to reflect that transition in an elegant way.” – Grant Knudson, Head of Product Creation, Puma.

Puma X Collection

Causeway Jacket – $140

Featuring an antiqued zipper, button closure, hand pockets and a traditional houndstooth pattern, the Causeway Jacket is both water and wind-resistant and comes in a peacoat colorway.

Antrim Pant – $110

The Antrim Pant features a polyester-wool blend fabric and subtle houndstooth pattern, while the waistband contains a hook and bar closure. The pant is designed to wear both on and off the course and is available in a peacoat colorway.

Donegal Polo – $85

Designed with a longer four-button placket and a front chest pocket that features a discoverable houndstooth accent pattern on the inside that matches the interior of the neck. The Donegal is available in bright white, Irish green and peacoat colorways.

Skerries Polo – $85

Containing a deconstructed houndstooth pattern throughout the body of the shirt, the Skerries utilizes a premium, moisture-wicking, technical fabric with a rib-knit collar, and is available in bright white, Irish green and peacoat hues.

Dunluce ¼ Zip Pullover – $120

Featuring a premium pima cotton cashmere blend fabric, the Dunluce contains an antiqued zipper, a contrast green tipping on the collar, ribbed cuffs and comes in peacoat-Irish green or quiet shade-Irish green.

P 110 X Cap – $30

The P 110 X Cap features a raised leather P logo to complement the moisture-wicking sweatband and slight curve brim and is available in both peacoat and white shade bodies each with a brown leather P detailing.

IGNITE PROADAPT X Shoes – $220

Containing all of the benefits included in the brand’s original IGNITE PROADAPT shoes, the X version comes in a peacoat body with Irish green and bright white colors.

All of Puma’s X Collection is available now to purchase at Pumagolf.com as well as select retailers.

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Equipment

WRX Spotted: Mizuno MP-20 irons, T20 wedge on USGA Conforming list

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Thanks to WRX Member mrmikeac, we have some photos that confirm the new Mizuno line will, in fact, be the MP20, along with a new T-Series wedge: the T20.

We don’t have details from Mizuno yet beyond the pictures from the USGA’s site, but there appear to be four different models of irons including an SEL (something, something, lefty?) set which is good news for you southpaws.

There has been lots of discussion so far in the forums, along with a speculation piece written by or own Ryan Barath (One Post Many Questions – New Mizuno Speculation).

The models are

MP20 (Blade) 

MP20 MMC (Multi-Material Cavity)

MP20 HMB

Speculated to be Hot Metal Blade thanks to the Chromoloy on the hosel, there are two versions on the USGA list, which could also mean a blended set with solid forged irons in the shorter clubs.

MP20 SEL

T20 wedge

We’re going to have to wait until confirmation from Mizuno to get all the details but join in the discussion in the GolfWRX forums.

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Equipment

Forum Thread of the Day: “New set of irons on a budget of $500-$700?”

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Today’s Forum Thread of the Day comes from GarhawlR who is on the hunt for a new set of irons and is looking for suggestions on how to get the best bang for his buck with a budget of between $500 and $700. Our members disclose their advice for how to go about filling your bag if you’re on a budget.

Here are a few posts from the thread, but make sure to check out the entire discussion and have your say at the link below.

  • rgk5: “Pre-owned Srixon 585 or Wilson Staff W6 will fit the budget. Maltby irons are okay but will have virtually no resale value down the road.”
  • PushDrawFlush: “$500-700 is plenty to find new-to-me forged irons. I’d keep an eye out for some Srixon z745/765 if you want something similar to your MP25s but a little chunkier/more forgiving.”
  • T.B: “Sub 70 and hogans. Maltby makes great clubs. You have a lot of options at that price range. Take your time, and you’ll find something you really want.”
  • revenant: “You should be able to do this without much trouble. My MP-4s (3-PW) were $280 from global golf with minimal face wear (good grooves and no rust/wear spots).”

Entire Thread: “New set of irons on a budget of $500-$700”

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19th Hole

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