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Blurred Lines: Mizuno launches JPX-900 Tour irons

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Mizuno, which has set the golden standard for players irons over the years, is blurring the lines between a blade iron and a forged cavity back with its new JPX-900 Tour irons. The new irons pass the eye-test for a blade, but they’re pumped up with performance features usually reserved for Mizuno’s bulkier JPX irons.

A Mizuno JPX-900 Tour 6 iron at address.

A Mizuno JPX-900 Tour 6 iron at address.

Like Mizuno’s MP iron models, which are designed for the most discerning and skilled golfers, the JPX-900 Tour irons are made from Mizuno’s Grain Flow forged 1025E Mild Carbon Steel to give golfers the familiar soft, solid feel for which Mizuno is known.

“We wanted to make the best Grain Flow Forged iron ever,” says David Llewellyn, Mizuno’s Director of R&D.

What’s different about the JPX-900 Tour irons is the more aggressive styling, which is part form, part function. The addition of Mizuno’s angular “Power Frame” to the cavity increases moment of inertia (MOI), which makes the irons more forgiving. Yet according to Llewellyn, the refined cavity-back irons should be an easy transition for its staff players, Chris Wood and Luke Donald, who currently use the company’s MP-5 blade irons.

JPX900_Tour_CloseUp 1

Mizuno’s MP-64 irons, a forged cavity-back that many in the Mizuno community believe to be the best-feeling Mizuno iron in recent memory, was used as the benchmark for the acoustics of the JPX-900 Tour irons. By using the company’s HIT (Harmonic Impact Technology) system, which measures and quantifies sound frequencies, Mizuno was able to mimic the acoustics of the MP-64 irons while improving on their construction.

Specs

MizunoJPX900Tourironspecs

In terms of looks, the JPX-900 Tour irons are smaller than the MP-25 irons released in 2015, with a lower toe height and a “more modern design” than the MP-25 irons, Llewellyn says. Another note of distinction: the soles of the JPX-900 Tour irons which are thinnest ever used on a JPX model, and feature the same sole geometries Mizuno has been giving its MP irons for several generations. This design will create more versatility than ever from a JPX offering, something better players will surely appreciate.

JPX900_Tour_3Clubs+Shafts

The stock shaft for the JPX-900 Tour irons is True Temper’s Dynamic Gold AMT, which uses an ascending weight design to improve performance of each iron. In the X100 flex, for example, the 3-iron shaft weighs roughly 115 grams, while the pitching wedge shafts weighs about 130 grams. The lighter long-iron shafts help golfers hit higher-flying long-iron shots, making it easier to hit and hold greens, while the heavier short iron shafts provide added stability for greater precision.

JPX900_Tour+GolfPride

Mizuno’s JPX-900 Tour irons, available Sept. 16, will sell for $1,199.99 in either steel or graphite. There is no upcharge for custom shafts or grips.

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He played on the Hawaii Pacific University Men's Golf team and earned a Masters degree in Communications. He also played college golf at Rutgers University, where he graduated with a Bachelor of Arts in Journalism.

49 Comments

49 Comments

  1. Ufourix

    Aug 22, 2016 at 7:34 am

    Will they be offered in Left Handed??

  2. TWShoot67

    Aug 16, 2016 at 3:52 pm

    I use to play Mizuno blades for the longest time 14’s, 29’s and even the 33’s. Didn’t like the 32’s, but these look like they might be that perfect go between blade and cb. If they feel like my old time dizzy blades with a little extra punch Mizuno may have me back. But for now I’m sticking with my King Cobra pro mb/cb’s. Definitely can’t wait to demo. Love the minimal offset, one thing I din’t like about the 29’s in the scoring clubs was the huge amount of offset thus the Tiger combo of 29’s in long irons and 14’s in scoring clubs.

  3. tonks

    Aug 15, 2016 at 7:26 am

    I am using Mizuno TP9s with DG S400 shafts for the last four years (designed in 1986). I bought them from someone who had only used them four times from new (they were still in the original Mizuno box!). I find them well balanced and accurate and they look fantastic. The loft of the 7 iron is 37 degrees. Does anyone have any thoughts as to how they compare with MPs and JPXs should I want to change to a modern club?

  4. Tim

    Aug 12, 2016 at 7:50 pm

    Does anyone else see the Ping s55 when you look at these irons? The toe portion of the cavity is identical as well as the general shape of the cavity. Overall design goal is exactly what the s55 achieved: smaller, players cavity back iron. Good news for all the fans of Ping’s S line who have being asking Ping to forge their clubs.

    • KK

      Aug 13, 2016 at 9:47 pm

      Just the high toe weighting. Everything else is very different, including the unseen tech.

    • Double Mocha Man

      Mar 17, 2017 at 11:04 am

      Does anyone else see the Titleist AP1 and AP2 irons when they look at the back of these clubs?

  5. Dane

    Aug 12, 2016 at 3:56 pm

    To bad Mizuno doesn’t offer the Dynamic Gold Tour Issue shafts in custom. That’s my favorite iron shaft. These irons would be awesome paired with those shafts. Most of the club manufacturers carry that shaft but for some reason Mizuno does not.

    • L

      Aug 12, 2016 at 4:30 pm

      Not this again.
      There is no need for those shafts. Mizuno can build their clubs to precise spec with the standard ones. No need to spend the extra money for labels

      • Dane

        Aug 14, 2016 at 1:51 am

        It’s not just labels. The Tour Issue model has a tighter tolerance and are more consistent compared to the standard shafts. I can feel the difference between the two and others can agree with me. It’s the #1 shaft model on Tour. Titleist, TaylorMade, Callaway and Ping offer that shaft but not Mizuno. That’s unfortunate in my honest opinion.

        Also, Go to TrueTemper.com where they have a video explaining the differences between the two shafts. Your not paying more for a label, your paying more for a better, tighter tolerance and more consistent shaft.

        • Jim

          Aug 14, 2016 at 11:39 pm

          ….and everyone on tour was ALSO SST Pured….every shaft can be found to have a most stable plane to install in the head for optimum feel & performance.

          while it’s been illegal to manufacture a shaft specifically with a ‘spine’ to be inserted in a specific orientation, It’s not illegal to ‘find’ it in a shaft and reinstall it so it lies on a better axis…

          I’m diggin KBS now after being an original Brunswick Rifle defector from DG X100’s

        • Christopher

          Aug 15, 2016 at 11:05 am

          From what I remember originally they’re the same shaft, just cherry-picked. There wouldn’t be any difference in feel or performance between two shafts weighted the same, with the same playing characteristics. The only difference would be the label and the upcharge.

          An expert clubmaker could cherry pick the same exact Dynamic Gold shafts off the rack and there would be no difference, apart from the price. You’re only paying more for True Temper to sort the shafts correctly, which is arguably something they should do in the first place.

        • Scooter McGavin

          Aug 15, 2016 at 4:52 pm

          No, you can’t feel the difference.

          • Eric

            Aug 16, 2016 at 8:55 pm

            Some players won’t feel the difference between the standard shafts versus Tour Issue shafts but good players will. Plus the Tour Issue shafts look better with the Tour Issue shaft band.

            • Christopher

              Aug 17, 2016 at 4:10 pm

              They’re the same shaft, so they’re imagining a difference. The only difference is that each shaft will match your other shafts in your irons to a tighter margin, but you could cherry pick the standard Dynamic Gold shafts to achieve the same result. Imagine if you bought new pool balls for your 9-ball table, one or two balls are slightly heavier or lighter than the others, that would be your Dynamic Gold set, and the Tour Issue’s would all be same weight. They’re the same balls, they just have tighter quality control with the Tour Issues.

  6. MP-4

    Aug 12, 2016 at 1:17 pm

    “…should be an easy transition for its staff players.” Highly doubt LD would move from the MP-5 to a JPX iron. Going to be awhile before anything surpasses the MP-5. Looking forward to the JPX 900 driver though, which I think is the most interesting club of the new JPX line.

  7. bogeypro

    Aug 12, 2016 at 9:34 am

    What is your beef with Mizuno? Did they touch you inappropriately or something? They make great equipment. Don’t get mad at them if you can’t play it…

    • smizzletroll

      Aug 12, 2016 at 11:58 am

      no, they didn’t touch him, thats his beef. professional troll of golf message boards, ridiculously sad…

  8. KK

    Aug 11, 2016 at 10:51 pm

    Beautiful but these don’t look very forgiving– basically an MB. Tour is a good name.

  9. Dat

    Aug 11, 2016 at 8:53 pm

    I think they look very different for Mizuno in a good way. Really looks like the engineers spent their time on this one. A true leap in the generation of their products. I don’t care what they call them as long as they perform.

  10. Double Mocha Man

    Aug 11, 2016 at 6:54 pm

    They look like a streamlined version of the Titleist AP-2 irons.

  11. Tom Duckworth

    Aug 11, 2016 at 5:11 pm

    I have never owned a set of Mizuno irons but have always wanted to . Just never got around to it. I have some Wilson FG Tour V2s with some Nippon shafts that I just can’t kick out of the bag. These look really nice I never liked the looks of the 800 series and didn’t think the MPs were right for me. The MP-64s are beautiful and I was thinking about getting a used set for fun and to try them out. Maybe I’ll have to look into these. This is the first series of JPX irons that look good to me funny I always thought MPs were some of the best looking irons out there and JPX the worst . Hope to see some reviews soon. Maybe Mizuno will want some WRX testers.

  12. Brian

    Aug 11, 2016 at 4:10 pm

    You should stick with your Callaways and their 29 degree 7 iron.

  13. Jay

    Aug 11, 2016 at 2:57 pm

    While the “no upcharge” is nice, if you prefer a more stock shaft – DG S300 – kind of have to feel you are getting hosed.

    • DJ

      Aug 11, 2016 at 5:24 pm

      Why would anyone take a chevy when the caddilac is the same price? They are not targeting the cheap end with these irons.

    • Jim

      Aug 14, 2016 at 11:30 pm

      Actually, it was a huge, smart move from Callaway…First year of Apex irons, they knew they were so good – and 1099 – $100 more than other big OEM’s ‘BEST’ they offered whichever shaft you needed for no upcharge. That helped make them a huge successs.
      When Rocketblades died a painful death after only 8 months and Speedblades (the next ‘greatest iron ever made’) came out with the same POS $9.00 shaft as Rocketblades for $899, getting into Apex (a FAR better head) w/KBS C-Tapers or Project X’s for 200 more wasn’t that big a stretch for shoppers.

      it’s a smart move for every OEM. Cripes – even Adams put CTapers in that funky black head a couple years ago, and they came to market for 699. It destroyed that dog Speedblade head…

      DG’s are reliable shafts – the standard we judge from – kinda like an IBM Mainframe – but if for no extra charge, you can
      definitely get a better feeling better performing stick.

      it always goes back to getting fit by an expert – with outdoor ball flight & proper launch monitor… Steel shaft tech has been blowin’ up big time in last 5 years. Take advantage of it!

  14. Bl

    Aug 11, 2016 at 12:51 pm

    Looks cool. Smaller than the MP-25? Even better.

  15. Chuck

    Aug 11, 2016 at 12:10 pm

    1. So no tungsten in the soles or the toes? Do they accomplish most of what is going on with the tungsten inserts in other brands, with just the shape of the perimeter weighting? I’d be fine with that. My gripe with the tungsten-weighted Titleists was that the head was just a shade too compact for my own tastes.

    2. Are these the strongest lofts that Mizuno has ever offered?

    3. I would want a lot more information on the sole grinds. Does Mizuno offer anything custom in that regard? Can you order a blunted leading edge?

    4. So is this the prelude to a new MP model?

    • Brian

      Aug 11, 2016 at 12:55 pm

      1. Mizuno has never used tungsten inserts in their irons and these do not depart from that standard.
      2. These have the same loft specs as the MP-25, MP-15, and MP-5; so no, these aren’t lofted strong.
      3. You would likely have to order custom sole grinds from Mizuno’s Yoro arm and should expect to pay a premium to do so.
      4. No idea

      • tl

        Aug 11, 2016 at 4:30 pm

        And, they are also still 1/4″ shorter than Titleist

        • kloyd0306

          Aug 12, 2016 at 8:57 pm

          Don’t you mean that Titleist are 1/4 inch longer than Mizuno?

          There is no industry standard for length. Who is to say that Titleist’s lengths are the correct length? Besides, stock lengths are only for stock clubs and if you are buying stock clubs from anyone, you may as well drive a car that does not have an adjustable seat, an adjustable steering wheel or adjustable mirrors.

          Mizuno measures length WITHOUT the grip. Titleist measures length WITH the grip. There is still a small difference but not a 1/4 inch when both are finished.

  16. Justin

    Aug 11, 2016 at 11:34 am

    If they are in fact smaller than the MP25s then I’ll be salivating over these. May have to work up a combo set with MP25 4 and 5 irons

  17. Dj

    Aug 11, 2016 at 10:59 am

    Look like 716 ap2

    • Scooter McGavin

      Aug 11, 2016 at 1:38 pm

      Yeah, except that they don’t.

    • Brian

      Aug 11, 2016 at 4:08 pm

      They look like the club that the Ap2 aspires to be.

      • Dj

        Aug 11, 2016 at 5:50 pm

        Except ap2 will outsell by 20 times

        • Brian

          Aug 12, 2016 at 8:39 am

          I’m not a Mizuno shareholder, so their sales aren’t a concern of mine.

  18. rpm300

    Aug 11, 2016 at 10:52 am

    They look nice, but as usual for Mizuno, they have way too muck offset in the short irons.

  19. Alex

    Aug 11, 2016 at 10:23 am

    My gosh, those look incredible. However, am I the only person who thinks those grooves seem like they’re extending too far on the toe?

  20. sumsum

    Aug 11, 2016 at 10:21 am

    I hear they will be offering Recoil now with no upcharge, might make this a mean set!

  21. Marty Moose

    Aug 11, 2016 at 10:06 am

    Mizuno makes very nice clubs. If I were one of the current Nike staffers, I’d be talking to Mizuno. Even if that means a pay cut. Prob turn out to to be the same $ if they continue to wear Nike clothing.

  22. Nolanski

    Aug 11, 2016 at 10:01 am

    Pretty

  23. LabraeGolfer

    Aug 11, 2016 at 9:56 am

    Best selling irons of 2016-2017…. Well should be anyway at least for better players. They look fantastic and they are Mizuno’s so I know they will perform.

    • Mikec

      Aug 12, 2016 at 9:12 am

      So you are making a predication that these will lead iron sales??

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Whats in the Bag

Sergio Garcia WITB 2020

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Driver: TaylorMade SIM (9.0 degrees)
Shaft: Mitsubishi Tensei CK Pro Blue 80 TX

3-wood: TaylorMade SIM Rocket 3 (14 degrees)
Shaft: Mitsubishi Tensei CK Pro Blue 80 TX

5-wood: TaylorMade SIM (19 degrees)
Shaft: Mitsubishi Tensei CK Pro Blue 80 TX

Irons: Ping Blueprint (3-PW)
Shaft: Nippon NS Pro Modus 3 Tour 130 X

Wedges: Ping Glide Forged (54-10, 58-8)
Shafts: Nippon NS Pro Modus 3 Tour 130 X

Putter: Ping PLD Anser

Grips: SuperStroke S-Tech

Ball: Titleist Pro V1

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GolfWRX Spotlight: Titleist Vokey SM8 wedges

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What Titleist tells us:  “SM8 features a reimagined progressive center of gravity, which produces the most accurate and forgiving Vokey wedge yet. Using tungsten weights and varied hosel lengths, the Vokey R&D team has moved the CG outside of the wedge head and placed it in front of the face, resulting in increased MOI and exceptional feel.” 

“For the golfer, this means an optimized ball flight and a clubface that simply wants to square up at impact. SM8 accomplishes all of this while preserving the classic Vokey head shape players demand.”

In simple terms, what Bob Vokey and his team have done is gone even further with CG placement and dialed it in to make sure each unique wedge has its own flight DNA. Since most players go with a four wedge system—46, 52, 56, 60, for example—it is essential that full shot wedges do full shot things and higher lofted wedges do their duty around the greens. 

Spin Milled grooves to ensure maximum spin and consistency is also a trademark of Vokey wedges. All OEMs have their version of this, they all work effectively and the SM8 is no different.

Vokey SM8 wedges: Specs and grinds

The grind I was most taken with was the M Grind, which, according to Titleist, is the most versatile of all the grinds. It’s got plenty of bounce squared up and has just the right amount of heel and toe give when opened up.

Overall thoughts

I had the opportunity to test the SM8. My biggest takeaways: the feel, which is solid, the flight on the gap and sand wedges was lower with a ton of spin and the higher-lofted wedges were extremely stable on mishits, especially off of a tight lie.

Do you know that shot that comes out at the toe and floats a bit? Maybe not getting to the top of a slope or carrying some rough? Those shots hold their line a lot better which ultimately could be the difference between a six-footer for par or another chip.

In simple terms, this one was kind of a layup. Of course, Vokey is going to make a fantastic wedge line. It’s the most played wedge on Tour by a bajillion and for good reason. They always have a clean simple look, there are enough grinds to satisfy any golfer—and you can’t argue with legacy.

Truth is, there are a ridiculous amount of good wedges out there by all the big OEMs. I know. I’ve tried em all. But there is something about the golfing public and Bob Vokey that just won’t stop. That’s a great thing. 

 

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Today from the Forums: “Recommend me a 14th club…”

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Today from the Forums showcases our members helping out ewe8523 who is on the hunt for a 14th club. Per ewe8523:

“My home course is fairly short 6050 yards, so I’m not really in a position where I have to hit a lot of long fairway shots. There is one par 5 on each side – 548 and 449 respectively.

Open to other options as well.

Including current specs and avg distance.

  1. Driver – Cobra F9 – 250 yards
  2. 3-Wood – Cobra F7 – 220 yards
  3. Hybrid – Callaway Epic – 200 yards
  4. 5 Iron – Callaway Apex CF16 – 175 yards
  5. 6 Iron – Callaway Apex CF16 – 165 yards
  6. 7 Iron – Callaway Apex CF16 – 155 yards
  7. 8 Iron – Callaway Apex CF16 – 145 yards
  8. 9 Iron – Callaway Apex CF16 – 130 yards
  9. PW – Callaway Apex CF16 – 115 yards
  10. 50 Degree – Vokey SM6 – 100 yards
  11. 56 Degree – Vokey SM6 – 75 yards
  12. 60 Degree – Cleveland CBX – Bunker Only
  13. Putter – Scotty Cameron Newport 2
  14. ?”

WRXers have been giving their suggestions on what could work best for ewe8523, and also discussing what they have found most useful from a 14th club standpoint.

Here are a few posts from the thread, but make sure to check out the entire discussion and have your say at the link below.

  • heathpitts: “Very similar setup and gapping to my setup. Although my wedge lofts are a bit different. I have wedges at 50, 54, 58, and 62 but generally, only carry 3 per round. I adjust the 54-62 based on where I’m gonna play. I do also have a graphite shafted 3 utility iron that I play around with as a driving iron, but I see that you haven’t really found one that you like. I adjust the 14th club based on the course or conditions or time of year (due to different wedge grinds) sometimes but try to keep it as simple as possible. I think your setup is pretty good honestly. I always seem to score better with fewer options, so I don’t try to get cute with shot selection 🙂 I play 13 clubs a lot of times.”
  • MP4444: “I agree with the others on a club to hit that 185-190yrd spot. Either a hybrid or an iron with extra help compared to the CF16s. I personally have a 4 hybrid and a more game-improvement style 5 iron that I use interchangeably for this spot in my bag depending on how I’m striking the ball. When my ball striking is on, I usually prefer an iron in this spot because my misses are smaller, but it’s nice to have the help of a hybrid when I’m not feeling so on with my game. If you go the iron route just be sure to check out the lofts to ensure the proper gapping. Some game improvement and super game improvement type irons have stronger lofts so you may need to look at a 4 or 5 iron depending on the model. I would also recommend hitting both on a launch monitor and comparing peak height and spin numbers. You are still typically looking to hold a green at this distance, so you want to make sure you are getting enough height and spin to have a chance.”
  • Z1ggy16: “The obvious choice is like a 188-yard club but if you never need that shot… Why spend the money? Other option is like a 64* wedge, but that’s probably going to get you into trouble more often than not. I’d lean toward the 185-190 yard club, probably another hybrid, gives you more flexibility if you play other courses that are longer.”
  • crapula: “Higher lofted Callaway Epic?”

Entire Thread: “Recommend me a 14th club…”

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