Connect with us

Reviews

In-Depth Review: Titleist Vokey SM6 Wedges

Published

on

Pros: A new, progressive CG design helps the low-lofted wedges fly a few yards farther, and improves the feel of the high-lofted wedges while boosting consistency. With lofts from 46-62 degrees and five distinct grinds, most golfers will be able to find an SM6 wedge that works for them.

Cons: At $149, they’re $20 more expensive than SM5 models.

Who they’re for: All golfers.

The Review

  • Price: $149 (MAP)
  • Lofts: 46, 48, 50, 52, 54, 56, 58, 60, 62
  • Grinds: F (46-56), S (54-60), M (54-62), L (58-60), K (58-60)
  • Finishes: Tour Chrome (plated), Steel Gray (plated) and Jet Black (QPQ)
  • Stock Shaft: True Temper Dynamic Gold S200
  • Construction: Cast (8620 carbon steel)

A glance at Vokey’s new SM6 wedges reveals that something is different. Some golfers will understand the science of why the wedges look like they do, but many won’t. Unlike a lot of new golf club technologies, however, golfers won’t need to be in the know to be impressed. I don’t talk about the “cool factor” in many of my reviews, but the SM6 wedges certainly have it.

Vokey_SM6_Featured_2

Those curves on the back of the SM6 wedges? They create what’s called a progressive center of gravity (CG), which means the weighting of the SM6 wedges varies based on loft. The lowest-lofted SM6 wedges (46-52 degrees) have the lowest CG, the mid-lofted wedges (54, 56 degrees) have a higher CG and the highest-lofted wedges (58-62 degrees) have the highest CG. The three different CG positions match the desired impact area on each wedge’s club face — lower-lofted wedges are generally contacted lower on the face, while higher-lofted wedges are generally contacted higher on the face — to improve trajectory, feel and consistency.

Low-Lofted SM6 Wedges 

If you’ve ever wished your Vokey 46-, 48-, 50- or 52-degree wedge flew a little farther, SM6 models will. Vokey says the low-lofted SM6 wedges create about 1.5 mph more ball speed and 3-4 yards more distance, and I buy their claim after testing SM6 wedges that were built to the same specs as my SM5 models on Foresight GC2.

“Distance doesn’t matter with wedges,” you might be saying, and you’re correct in theory. Who cares if your gap wedge goes 110 or 113 yards, as long as you hit it a consistent distance. That’s not the issue, though. Improvements in golf equipment technology have irons flying farther than they ever have, which means more golfers need a club — and maybe even two clubs — between 46-and-52 degrees to bridge the gap between their shortest iron and mid-or-high-lofted wedge.

I’m one of those golfers who needs two wedges to fill the gap. I use a 9 iron that measures 41 degrees and carries about 150 yards. I also use a 54-degree wedge (bent to 55 degrees) that carries about 105 yards. I fill the gap with a 46-degree wedge (bent to 45 degrees) that carries about 135 yards. I prefer its look and feel to the pitching wedge from my iron set because I can vary trajectory more easily with it. I also carry a 50-degree wedge that carries about 120 yards.

An issue I had with the SM5 wedges (46-08 F Grind, 50-08 F Grind) is the same one I’ve always had with other low-lofted wedges. Many times when I tried to hit them a little harder to make them go a few yards farther, they didn’t. Shots often just went higher due to excess spin. I’ve seen countless golfers experience this problem, especially better players.

The biggest improvement to the low-lofted SM6 wedges is that they create a more iron-like ball flight. It’s slight, but their faster trajectory is a little bit less likely to balloon. To me, they also feel slightly softer than the SM5’s at impact.

Probably just as important as the new progressive CG design of the low-lofted SM6 wedges is something that isn’t new — the different bounce options Vokey offers in its 50- and 52-degree wedges. Both the 50- and 52-degree models are offered in F Grinds with effective bounce angles of 8 and 12 degrees. Most manufacturers offer multiple bounce options in their mid- and high-lofted models, but it’s rare to see two different options in low-lofted models.

In July 2015, I traveled to Titleist’s Oceanside, California Test Facility to learn more about the company’s 716 iron line. During the downtime, Titleist offered me an opportunity to be fit for SM5 wedges by the man himself, Bob Vokey. My steeper angle of attack theoretically made me a better fit for the 50-12 F Grind (a 50-degree wedge with 12 degrees of effective bounce), but my results were better with the 50-08 F Grind.

Vokey explained that the reduced bounce helped me contact the ball slightly higher on the face, and that improved my ball flight. That moment cemented how important it is for golfers to be fit for not just their lob wedge, but for as many of their wedges as possible.

Mid-Lofted SM6 Wedges 

The mid-lofted SM6 wedges (54 and 56 degrees) are most similar to the SM5 models, as they do not have the weight pads used in the low-lofted and high-lofted wedges. That’s because, according to Vokey representatives, the CG of the mid-lofted wedges was pretty much where it needed to be.

For that reason, the biggest change golfers will notice if they switch to an SM6 from an SM5 is the shaping. Unlike the low-lofted SM6 wedges, which are significantly smaller than SM5 models and have shorter hosels, the mid-lofted SM6 wedges are roughly the same size. There’s no denying, however, that the shaping of the SM6 wedges gives them a more streamlined look. Their toes are more rounded, their top lines are thinner and their par area, the part of a wedge’s top line that conjoins with the hosel, blends more seamlessly.

I’ve given my SM5 and SM6 54-14 F Grind wedges (bent to 55 degrees) to several golfers and had them hit shots with each one to see if they could notice a different in feel. Some told me the SM6 felt softer, while others told me the SM5 felt softer. For that reason, its hard to make an absolute statement about a change in feel in the mid-lofted wedges. I’ve had a few golfers tell me the SM5 wedges look better at address, but many more have preferred the look of the SM6.

Before moving on to the high-lofted wedges, I want to point out two more things; one is specific to the mid-lofted models, one that is not.

IMG_9609

SM6 wedges use Vokey’s new TX4 grooves that feature a parallel face texture to increase spin and consistency.

  • Like SM5 models, both the 54 and 56 are available in three different grinds (F, S and M). For the SM6 line, however, the popular M Grind has 2 degrees less effective bounce to make it more versatile from a wider variety of lies.
  • All SM6 wedges also feature Vokey’s new TX4 grooves, which use a machine-milled, parallel face texture that Titleist says can increase consistency and sharpens groove edges to add as much as 200 rpm of spin. The SM6 wedges also use the same progressive groove design as the SM5 wedges. The lower-lofted wedges (46-54) use narrower, deeper grooves to displace more debris on square-face shots, while higher-lofted wedges (56-62) use shallower grooves that create more friction on open-face shots.

High-Lofted SM6 Wedges 

With a slightly higher CG, the high-lofted SM6 wedges do seem to launch shots slightly lower and with a little more spin than SM5 models, and that’s exactly what most better players want their high-lofted wedges to do. But the change likely won’t be noticed by the majority of golfers. What they will notice, however, is how much better the high-lofted SM6 wedges feel at impact. Every golfer has experienced the “clank” that occurs when a wedge shot is hit too high on the face, or toward the heel or toe at impact. With the high-lofted SM6 wedges, those shots felt softer and more solid.

Due to their higher CG, the high-lofted wedges also seemed to be a little more consistent in my testing on Foresight. Especially when hitting 50-yard shots, I saw that the 60-degree SM6 M Grind wedge seemed to land a little closer my target on mishits. Sometimes it flew 1-2 yards farther than I expected when I contacted a shot slightly on the toe or the heel; sometimes shots just held their line just a little bit better. The difference is small, but can make an difference. We’re all better at making 6-foot putts than we are 9-footers, aren’t we?

As for shaping, the new wedges don’t look the same as the SM5’s at address. They appear slightly larger, and have the same general appearance as the other wedges in the new line.

IMG_9639

At Address: A Vokey SM6 lob wedge (60-08 M Grind)

No discussion of a Vokey high-lofted wedge is complete without mentioning their four distinct sole grinds, which Team Vokey continues to tweak based on its work with Tour players, as well as average golfers. Despite the several improvements to the new wedges, the grinds continue to be one of their main selling points. That’s how powerful using the proper sole grind can be.

Again, it’s best to get fitted, but if you can’t, the chart and list below offers a few starting points.

Vokey_SM6_Specifications

full-chart

  • If you struggle from the sand, try the K Grind (available in 58, 60). It has the widest sole of any Vokey wedge, and can work well for golfers with steep attack angles. Compared to SM5 K Grind wedges, it has 1-degree more effective bounce to help the wedge better resist digging on square-face shots.
  • If you play courses with extremely firm turf conditions, try the L Grind (available in 58, 60). It has the lowest effective bounce (4 degrees), and slightly more camber than SM5 models to goflers resist digging.
  • The M Grind (available in 54, 56, 58, 60, 62) will work best for golfers who like to manipulate the face open or closed, while the S Grind (available in 54, 56, 58, 60, 62) is better for golfers who tend to play more square-faced shots. The 58 and 60-degree S Grind wedges have 3-degrees more bounce than SM5 models.

Vokey Custom Options

As noted above, I don’t use a standard SM5 wedge. At Oceanside, Vokey fit me for a V-Grind that’s offered through the company’s Hand Ground Program. According to Titleist representatives, Hand Ground SM6 wedges, which make available Tour-only grinds and enhanced customization options — will be released to the public at a later date.

Do I really need a V-Grind wedge? I must admit, with a little practice I could probably use the SM6 M Grind and hit all the shots I need to hit. But I liked the performance V Grind enough to pay the extra money for it (Hand Ground wedges start at $350 each).

For golfers not willing to pay that much for a completely custom wedge, Vokey offers more affordable custom options to standard SM6 wedges through its WedgeWorks Services. Through the program, golfers can customize the shafts, grips, shaft bands, ferrules, stampings and paintfill of their wedges. I’ve had several wedges customized through WedgeWorks, and the work is always A++.

Should you Upgrade?

Vokey_SM6_Featured_3

If you’re currently using a set of properly fit SM5 wedges, your transition from them to the SM6 models should be an easy one. Many golfers will see certain benefits from the newer wedges, as I did, but they may or may not warrant an immediate upgrade, especially if their grooves are still fresh.

An aside about buying wedges: Many tournament players purchase two sets of wedges at a time. They practice with one set and use another on the golf course, which keeps their grooves as fresh as possible for tournaments. While it doubles cost, it helps their gamer wedges last longer and adds peace of mind that they’re getting the best possible performance from their wedges on the course.

More questions?

Vokey_SM6_Featued_1

What else do you want to know? I’ll do my best to answer your questions in the comments section.

[wrx_retail_links productid=”80″]

Your Reaction?
  • 288
  • LEGIT23
  • WOW11
  • LOL2
  • IDHT1
  • FLOP7
  • OB4
  • SHANK22

46 Comments

46 Comments

  1. SirBigSpur

    Jun 1, 2016 at 2:37 pm

    Ok so two questions for the Author:

    (1) I’m a 14hcp and I’m looking to replace my 60 degree. I currently have a 52 and 56 Titleist SM5 and SM4, respectively, and my 60 is an older Nike VR Pro Dual-sole (which I really like). I see value in having wedges all be from the same manufacturer, so I’m looking at switching to Titleist. I really like my SM5 52 and was thinking of getting that as a 60 (on sale for $110), but reading this article is making me consider the SM6, even though it’s $40 more. Do you REALLY think I’ll see enough additional benefit from the SM6 to justify the extra $?

    (2) As I noted, my current 60 is of the dual-sole variety and has only 4 deg bounce, which looks to be a lot like the M grind. I rarely use my 60 out of sand or manipulate the face for chips/pitches. I’d say I hit about 40% full shots with it and it’s pretty much the only club I use around the green, regardless of the shot. I have a bit of a steep/digging swing so I’ve found that the low bounce is great if I hit is clean, but is devastating if I hit it even an few millimeters fat. I’m thinking about going with the K grind as it has the most bounce but still allows you to open the face if you need to for a particular shot. What are your thoughts on the bounce options and what should work best?

    Thank you!

    • Zak Kozuchowski

      Jun 1, 2016 at 3:28 pm

      K Grind sounds like a great option for you. It’s hard to value the SM5 v. the SM6 for everyone. For some, $40 is a small price to pay for the latest technology. For others, it’s a lot of money. I’m still using the SM5’s, and will until the grooves wear out.

      • SirBigSpur

        Jun 2, 2016 at 9:14 am

        Thanks for the quick response Zak! One other thing I like about the SM5s is the gold finish… I REALLY wish the SM6s had that option.

  2. Mark

    Mar 29, 2016 at 3:30 pm

    Bit the bullet. Our local store is selling them as same price as SM5s so not sure they have got the invoice yet…..58.10. S Grind. Plenty of grip and easy to knock down. Sole works well off wet soil and in sand. However the feel is the same as the SM5 and SM4. Harsh. Not a patch on my 588s or old MacDaddy 2…..absolutely no reason for the massive price hike. 7/10.

  3. (KCCO) is this.....

    Mar 20, 2016 at 12:09 pm

    Is this not one of his old designs (curve cut on back) he did in a limited release I have in indigo blue? I know they’re weren’t as many grind options, but the actually cast appears the same, so kinda just seems like a print dug up from fairly recent past. If I could post a pic, I would…I’m sure someone else on here has them as well.

    As for a forged wedge, may just be me….but having one jdm forged wedge in mix sometimes, after hitting thousands of balls, I’ve found (and may just be the material, and can’t say they were hit exactly the same amount of times, but literally a few thousand balls practicing around green) but wore a little faster than a cast wedge. And also agree, why no raw? Or even somehow allow groove/face to rust.
    ***i go through a wedge every 2 seasons, before its grooves look melted/dent in face, just to give an idea of wear per my wedges

  4. jgpl001

    Mar 14, 2016 at 6:02 pm

    WHY WHY WHY no RAW option???????

    Do we have to get to the SM10 before Titleist listen??????

  5. matt_bear

    Mar 13, 2016 at 3:00 pm

    Question for the author- what is your relationship with Titleis? I feel like some disclosure is needed. It’s the same exact author reviewing every Titleist product. Every review is 5 stars and go buy….now it’s go buy 2 sets. I’m a full bag Titleist user, but even I can read thru this a bit. It’s a nice comparison picture collection though. I do appreciate that.

    • Zak Kozuchowski

      Mar 14, 2016 at 8:22 am

      Matt,

      Thank you for reading and taking the time to comment. I’m glad to hear that you enjoyed our in-hand comparison photos, as well.

      I am the reviewer of the SM6 wedges, and the editor of GolfWRX. I have no affiliation with Titleist or any other equipment brand. Our readers have made it clear through the years that they want detailed Titleist equipment reviews, and in-depth reviews are my specialty. That’s why you’ve seen my name on so many Titleist review stories.

      No GolfWRX reviewer, whether it be an editor, staff writer or contributor, solely determines the score a product receives. All of our equipment editors meet to decide if a product receives a 5-star rating, and it has to be unanimous for a product to earn the rating. If you visit our review page — http://www.golfwrx.com/category/equipment/reviews/ — you’ll see that the distinction is only awarded to the top-performing products we test.

      You’re not the only one who has expressed confusion over our reviews, however, and we’re going to do a better job of explaining the process going forward. That’s why I appreciate feedback such as yours. It helps us get better.

  6. Bogeypro

    Mar 12, 2016 at 11:04 pm

    Is Vokey taking lessons from Scotty on how to market products? 150 for a cast wedge that is already at the limit of the groove rule is stupid.

  7. DTrump

    Mar 12, 2016 at 6:03 pm

    $149 for non-forged wedges with a design ripped off from somebody else. You can get a Mizzy forged wedge for $129. I don’t see the justification by Titleist.

    • Marcus Rogers

      Mar 13, 2016 at 10:19 am

      Who wants a forged wedge?

    • SirBigSpur

      Jun 1, 2016 at 10:44 am

      No one wants a forged wedge unless you plan to replace them twice a season. Forged metal, by its nature, is softer, and of course may feel better to some people. But that same softness is what makes it not a great choice for a wedge… the grooves will wear out much quicker, which when talking wedges, is a big deal. I would definitely recommend forged irons if you can find a set that fits your skill level (i.e. don’t go buy Mizzy blades if you’re a 20hcp, just b/c they FEEL good), but for wedges, I’d stick to cast for durability. This is especially true if you’re going to be dropping $150 for a brand new one! There’s a reason Titleist always has one of if not the best performing wedges out there… if being cast was a bad thing, that wouldn’t be the case.

  8. Double Mocha Man

    Mar 12, 2016 at 1:19 pm

    Only the price of gas goes down.

  9. Other Paul

    Mar 11, 2016 at 9:01 pm

    “We would rather have a 6′ then a 9′ putt”… What if instead of landing 6′ past you know landed 9′ past. Your logic.

  10. Marcus Rogers

    Mar 11, 2016 at 8:34 pm

    Ripoff. Thanks PXG. Titleist charges this much because they know they can. Titleist fans are loyal…just check the witb section of the forum. And now with spieth’s and Scott’s success…they are back on the map. I’m playing PING wedges now and have no plans of changing for a couple years. However if I were to get new wedges id go with the poor man’s titleist….Nike, or mizuno if I found a deal.

    • John doe

      Mar 11, 2016 at 8:45 pm

      “Back on the map”?

      When was Titleist off the map?

      • Marcus Rogers

        Mar 12, 2016 at 3:59 pm

        You are right they were never off the map, however for a brief stretch the lacked some presence with the top players in the world, especially after Rory switched to Nike.

  11. Joshuaplaysgolf

    Mar 11, 2016 at 7:06 pm

    I highly appreciated this review…the detail about spin rate differences is valuable to me, and is what I found during my fitting last week between the 6’s and 5’s. I appreciate the attention to detail that is put in. A lot of people get upset because it isn’t tailored to the ‘average golfer’, but as it clearly states, the differences are somewhat minimal between models, and good players who are playing/practicing daily and competing regularly are looking for these minimal improvements that help them take their game just a little further. If you only hit your wedges 5 times on the range before you play your once a week round, you can probably stick to the 5, get similar results, save some money, and stop complaining to all of us about how expensive golf clubs are.

  12. SB

    Mar 11, 2016 at 4:20 pm

    S or F for my 56… That is a though question

  13. M

    Mar 11, 2016 at 3:38 pm

    Zak,

    Any word on when Raw SM6 will be available on WedgeWorks and will they have all of the lofts and grinds this year unlike the SM5 only starting at 54*
    and any further info into what hand grind options there will be?
    Thanks

    • Zak Kozuchowski

      Mar 11, 2016 at 6:08 pm

      No update on this, M. We’ll post a story when we know more.

  14. Shawn

    Mar 11, 2016 at 3:25 pm

    Elaborate on different finish options.

    • Zak Kozuchowski

      Mar 11, 2016 at 6:10 pm

      Both the Tour Chrome and Steel Grey are plated, so they’ll look new the longest. The Jet Black finish is a QPQ, so it will wear the fastest. The finish will fade to silver on the club face and sole, and those areas will rust over time. Some people strip the finish to get a raw, rusty look.

  15. Golfinggal

    Mar 11, 2016 at 3:18 pm

    I believe the SM5 brochure recommend players change their wedges every 70 rounds. I would like to think they figured you would practice a bit between and before rounds . I play 70 rounds in about 3 1/2 months. I think your suggestion of two sets and theirs of changing them so often is just to sell more wedges. Maybe they need to come up with a more durable metal that keeps it’s groves sharp for many more rounds especially as the price keeps increasing.

  16. RL(Nihonsei)

    Mar 11, 2016 at 2:58 pm

    Great review! I didn’t hear a single thing about loft, lie, CG, or who pays for them in last night’s GOP debate? Oh, ask Bernie? I’ll get right on that, 2 wedge sets for All!!!

  17. Sam

    Mar 11, 2016 at 12:38 pm

    I wonder why they didn’t have oil can finish as an option? Miss those wedges that rust.

  18. RG

    Mar 11, 2016 at 12:15 pm

    Everything reviewed on this site gets 5 stars.

  19. Bryan K

    Mar 11, 2016 at 11:28 am

    149 for cast wedges is pretty high. Forged feel way better. Vokey has forged wedges for the Japanese market.

  20. Weekend Duffer

    Mar 11, 2016 at 11:04 am

    $450 drivers, $300 3 wood…now $150 for a wedge cmon. Guess us poor folk will have to stick to the used rack.

    • scott

      Mar 11, 2016 at 4:19 pm

      As long as it is the used wedge rack under 70 rounds.

  21. Leon

    Mar 11, 2016 at 10:15 am

    I have several Vokey SM4 and SM5. They are OK wedges. Perform as expected but feel just so so. I am bagging a few bridgestone J33 wedges (11 years old…) which perform extremely well with much softer feel. They are forged wedges with a more affordable price ($30 each). But if you are looking for some new wedges, give Mizuno and Bridgestone a shot. Their wedges are forged and feel way better, plus a more reasonable price. Vokey and Scotty Cameron are over priced for sure. But it is your call

  22. Ryan

    Mar 11, 2016 at 10:03 am

    I thought that I heard, from our Titleist Rep, that SM6 was not going to be available through wedge works. He said that SM5 was still available but that the SM6 was not going to be offered. Can anyone confirm or deny that?

    • Zak Kozuchowski

      Mar 11, 2016 at 6:13 pm

      SM6 wedges are available through WedgeWorks. At this time, they are not available through Vokey’s Hand Ground Program, but they will be. We will post an update as soon as we hear when.

  23. LB

    Mar 11, 2016 at 9:17 am

    Great job Zak. Best reviewer in the industry.

    • Zak Kozuchowski

      Mar 11, 2016 at 9:26 am

      Thanks so much, LB. This was a fun review to tackle, and I’m glad you enjoyed it.

  24. killerbgolfer

    Mar 11, 2016 at 9:04 am

    These look like great wedges. I doubt the accuracy of one of your last statements though, regarding “many” tournament players that but two sets of wedges, one for the bag and one for practice. I’ve played in tournaments from local clubs up to state ams for 20 years and have never heard of a player purchasing a separate set of wedges just to practice with. That might work for the pros who don’t pay for them, but it erodes the authenticity of the review and makes it read more like an elaborate advertisement. Appreciate what you do though I know many of us look to this site regularly for more information on all the new equipment.

    • Zak Kozuchowski

      Mar 11, 2016 at 9:25 am

      killerb,

      I was also put off the first time a fitter recommended I buy two sets of wedges, but the more I thought about it the more it made sense to me. And I’ve gotten the same advice from several fitters and top instructors since. If you’re really serious about short-game performance and practice a lot, why would you beat up your gamer wedge week after week in the practice bunker?

      I went back and forth about adding this into the review, but decided that it could be valuable for someone out there who may not hear it otherwise. The key is making sure you’re properly fit for your wedges and comfortable with them on the course before you splurge on on back-up set.

  25. Tom

    Mar 11, 2016 at 8:59 am

    Which wedge is the one that rusts this year?

  26. 2Short

    Mar 11, 2016 at 8:46 am

    Gee another 5 star review, go figure.

  27. Dj

    Mar 11, 2016 at 8:35 am

    149? It’s a wedge. They’ve increased their prices on everything this year

    • David Camp

      Mar 11, 2016 at 12:23 pm

      Hey it’s getting a lot more expensive to operate in California these days.

    • DatSliceDoe

      Mar 11, 2016 at 7:35 pm

      total rip off. No reason for that kind of increase given the SM line is the high water mark in wedge pricing as is…except the failed TM TP EF Spin Groove…that’s a mouthful.

      Anyhow, these look great, and if I get can get them for $70 used after a few hits by a fool who played them for two rounds like I got my SM5, maybe I’ll be a taker.

      • Double Mocha Man

        Mar 12, 2016 at 1:20 pm

        Only the price of gas goes down.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Equipment

WRX Spotlight Review: UST Mamiya Attas 11 shaft

Published

on

Product: UST Mamiya Attas 11 shaft

Pitch: From UST: “A revolutionary combination of innovative shaft design and advanced carbon fiber materials. We combined aerospace grade M40X Carbon Fiber with a new constant taper design. Designed for a higher launch, high performance shaft offering optimum flex and torque characteristics with feel. The ATTAS line has been a successful staple in UST’s offerings, and with the introduction of ATTAS 11 or “Jack,” this will be no exception. Designed to improve launch, but keep the stability the line is known for, this rendition enhances the line with better materials, better energy transfer, and an unforgettable feeling swing experience.”

You can find more info in our launch piece here.

UST Mamiya Attas 11 shaft

Our take on the 2020 UST Mamiya Attas 11 shaft

I was provided the Attas 11 6S weighing in at a raw weight of 66 grams, 3.8 degrees of torque, and profile promoting mid-spin with a mid to high launch. This shaft was placed in a Wilson Staff Cortex head playing 11 degrees with the weights in the neutral position and the sliding weight in the middle front location. The shaft was placed up against another UST offering: the Helium, which is a shaft that has been very popular and notable for its lightweight, but super stable design. I was also able to hit it against the Fujikura Atmos Blue Tour Spec 6S.

On course testing went right along with claims from UST. I experienced a good mid flight with notable lower spin than the Helium. The Attas 11 felt much stiffer than the Helium but not in a negative way. After a few rounds with “Jack,” I was impressed with the consistency I was getting in flight, control, and distance. My miss was predictable and controllable, whereas I have been having more of a two-way miss with the lighter Helium.

Review-UST Mamiya Attas 11 shaft

During an analysis at David Ayers’ Low Country Custom Golf with fitter and club guru Kristian Barker, we discussed shaft profiles and recorded some numbers to see how they compared. The first round was very subpar in terms of swing and after a round with all the shafts and a little guidance from Kristian, the second round was much better. I was very happy to be able to have a testing day where I can see how the equipment performed with bad and good swings.

ust-mamiya-attas-11-review

The Helium was the distance winner, but even though the offline number portrays better accuracy, I was having my typical two-way miss with both left and right big misses. The “Jack,” while a little shorter, gave me a consistent ball flight that was more likened to how I hit when I’m playing well. Also, though the Helium was a bit longer, that can easily be attributed to the fact that it is much lighter, and after the session, I measured it at 45.5 inches playing length whereas I had the Attas 11 cut to 45.

Overall, the Attas 11 is certainly a premium shaft that caters to those who would like a little higher launch without worrying about the spin getting too high or feeling overly stiff. On course and the launch monitor, this shaft performs and is every bit of what UST has marketed it to be in terms of launch, spin, and feel.

Your Reaction?
  • 8
  • LEGIT5
  • WOW0
  • LOL0
  • IDHT0
  • FLOP1
  • OB0
  • SHANK6

Continue Reading

Equipment

WRX Spotlight: EV3D putters

Published

on

We hear the buzz words “3D printed” all the time these days. It’s a newer technology that has shown to have lots of applications in other industries, but golf hasn’t been one of those until now. 3D printing a putter is a pretty new adventure, but EV3D Golf is showing that it is going to be much more common very soon.

EV3D Golf is bringing new putter designs to us golfers that CANNOT be made through traditional casting or milling. 3D printing is the process of creating a putter layer-by-layer, allowing any supported shape you can think of. Even hollow designs like EV3D’s signature lattice features!

This gives EV3D engineers the ability to create putters that push the limits of MOI, feel, and of course look. The intricate lattice design does more than just look really cool, it also helps move weight to the outside and rear of the putter, increasing MOI in all models. All EV3D putters are printed from a combination of 420 stainless steel and bronze. This alloy gives the putter its responsive feel, excellent durability, and the ability to offer 3 finishes. They also offer a ton of different hosel designs to fit your eye and putting stroke, all are 3D printed as well. EV3D even adds custom touches like text in the cavity, different site lines, and paint fill to make it your own. Right now they offer 6 different head shapes, but if none of those are what you are looking for, they will work with you to print your dream putter from scratch!

We got our hands on 2 models, the EV3D Golf Ares X and Hades, to take out to the course and putt with. In hand the first thing that grabs your eye’s attention is the intricate lattice work on the putters.

All you want to do is hold the putter closer to your face and see how the heck they did it. At the right angles you can actually see through that lattice structure, but we were told that debris getting stuck in there isn’t an issue. The next thing you will notice is the rough texture of the head. This is created by the process of 3D printing the head, showing off the layers of material used to build the shape of the head. I don’t know if was intended but that rough texture does help with reducing glare, making the putters easy on the eyes even in the brightest conditions.

I personally really like the Antique Bronze finish, but EV3D does offer a Natural and Slate Black finish to suit your personal taste. Out on the putting green the Ev3D putters performed really well, offering a hefty dose of forgiveness and a crisp feel and sound. Traditionally modes like the Hades don’t offer much in the way of forgiveness compared to mallets, but the Hades shocked me with its off-center putts. Putts hit off the heel or toe stayed on line much better and I even made a couple that had no business even being close to the hole.

Distance loss on those mishits is about what you would expect, coming up a little short, but defiantly not a drastic difference. Since the EV3D line doesn’t have any fancy face milling, I was a little worried about the initial roll and if the ball would hop or skid. Initial contact was great, only met with a tiny bit of skid before rolling out. Nothing that I think effected even my longest putts. The feel off the face is something that reminds you of a quieter classic Ping BeCu putter, crisp with an audible click. If you are looking for a silent impact, like an Odyssey Microhinge, then the EV3D line might not be your cup of tea. If you are on a quest for exceptional responsiveness on well struck and mishit putts then you should be very pleased with any of the EV3D putter models. The feel of impact is a little firmer than I think we are all used to these days with so many inserts and deep milling. The crisp feel and slightly more audible EV3D is somewhat refreshing and mishit putts are extremely easy to recognize.

Overall, the EV3D putters are a solid offering from a new company utilizing a new technology in the golf club space. With all the combinations of putter heads, site lines, and hosels, I can’t see you not being able to find a putter that fits your eye. Looks for any putter are going to be subjective, but there is no denying that EV3D is pushing the limits at a time where we see a lot of similar putter designs from all manufacturers. And if you are the type of person who wants to create an original design of your own that has never been done, EV3D is waiting for that call to help you take your idea from thought to printed putter head! Check the entire EV3D putter line at the company website.

Your Reaction?
  • 106
  • LEGIT22
  • WOW16
  • LOL8
  • IDHT1
  • FLOP10
  • OB3
  • SHANK58

Continue Reading

Apparel Reviews

WRX Spotlight: Adidas TOUR360 XT Twin Boa Golf Shoe

Published

on

The Product

The new Adidas TOUR360 XT Twin Boa, available in North America now, selling for $250 at adidas.com (only available on Adidas’ website, this shoe will not be at retail).

The Pitch

From Adidas: “The adidas TOUR360 XT Twin Boa® is the epitome of performance golf footwear, designed to offer micro-adjustability in two separate zones. The first is the independent main dial with high strength Boa lace that when combined with the forged 360 wrap creates unparalleled power for your swing by locking the area between your midfoot and forefoot. The second provides micro-adjustability from the middle to bottom instep for a customized fit, feel, and support. The Boa Fit System activates both zones to deliver the ultimate in power, stability, and performance.”

Our take on Adidas TOUR360 XT Twin Boa

BOA technology, a ratcheting cable system that replaces laces for securing the shoe, has been around for a while now. It was a radical departure when it first hit the market and traditionalists viewed it with some skepticism, but those who tried shoes using the system became hooked on the ease of use, secure feel, and reliability of the system. I have had to replace shoelaces, but I have never had a cable fail in a pair of shoes with Boa technology.

With the TOUR360 XT Twin Boa, Adidas has introduced the next step on Boa technology (pun intended). The shoe has a sleek, technology-forward look that is associated with Adidas products. It even looks good in the size 13 that I sport. The color selection is limited, to say the least. You can choose from white with green trim or white without green trim. But the star of the show is the Boa technology, which is implemented in two dials located on the outside of each shoe, replacing the one dial on previous iterations.

Each dial controls the fit for a different part of the shoe, and the ratcheting dial gives the wearer the most precise fit available. The real advantage over laces is that the Boa system stays secure longer and is easier to tighten than re-tying shoelaces. It’s so easy to reach down and give a couple of clicks that it became routine for me to check on each tee box to make sure I had a good fit before teeing off. Equally pleasing is the quick release on each dial that gets you out of your shoes at the end of a round without the terror of facing a wet double-knot.

The shoe is waterproof leather, and it is light and comfortable enough to walk 18 on hilly tracks. I personally would have preferred a slightly wider toe box, but that is nit-picking.

Overall, the Adidas TOUR360 XT Twin Boa is a performance shoe that promises, fit, comfort and stability, and it delivers on all fronts. Not everyone has $250 to drop on a pair of golf shoes, but if you want the tech on your feet to match the tech in your bag, then the Adidas TOUR360 XT Twin Boa is perfect for you.

Your Reaction?
  • 9
  • LEGIT2
  • WOW0
  • LOL0
  • IDHT0
  • FLOP1
  • OB4
  • SHANK47

Continue Reading

19th Hole

Facebook

Trending