Connect with us

Equipment

Ping G Fairway Woods, Hybrids and new Crossover

Published

on

For most golfers, fairway woods and hybrids play a relatively limited role during a round of golf. But when they are called upon, golfers expect those clubs to be more versatile than any other in their bag.

Take Ping’s G drivers, for example. They’re designed exclusively to help golfers hit their tee shots as far as possible. Ping’s G irons also share a singular focus; they’re made to help golfers hit their iron shots as close to the pin as possible.

Fairway woods and hybrids aren’t so simple, though. Sometimes golfers need to hit them as far as possible, while other times the clubs are called on for finesse shots, or to help a golfer advance a ball from a nasty lie in the rough.

With its line of G fairway woods, hybrids and a new club Ping is calling a “Crossover,” the company is offering golfers a smorgasbord of options that aim to help them find the club or combination of clubs that will best fill the distance gap between their driver and longest iron.

The G fairway woods, hybrids and Crossover will be in stores February 11. 

Ping G Fairway Woods ($287.50 MSRP) 

4376190cfacec877895ae293d300c3ae

  • Lofts: 15 (3 wood), 17.5 (5 wood) and 20.5 (7 wood)
  • Size: 167 cubic centimeters
  • Stock Shafts: Ping Alta 65, Ping Tour (65, 80)
  • Length: 43 (3 wood), 42.5 (5 wood), 42 (7 wood)
  • Swing Weight: D1

Calling a modern day fairway wood a “little driver” is a fair assessment given how far today’s fairway woods fly. Unlike drivers, however, most golfers want to be able to hit their fairway woods from all sorts of lies, making head size and shape crucial elements to their design.

Image from Ping Golf.

The G fairway woods sit lower to the ground than G30 models (Photo Credit: Ping).

Ping’s new G fairway woods are the same size as the company’s G30 fairway woods, but they have a shallower head shape and a redesigned leading edge that Ping says will help golfers contact their shots 12 percent higher on the club face when hit off the ground. The higher contact point gives golfers a higher launch angle with the clubs, adding height that makes the fairway woods more effective from long range.

a077d0c9dfec3f6782527003c6f4514d

Ping also made the new fairway woods’ club faces from a lighter, 455 carpenter steel, and returned to a Variable Face Thickness (VFT) design that is thinnest on the edge and thicker in the center to help a golfer’s bad shots fly more like their good shots.

Although the G fairway woods do not share the weight-saving, Dragonfly-inspired crowns used on the G drivers (insert link), their crowns are impressively thin. At 0.019 inches, they’re 25 percent thinner than the G30 fairway woods, which helped Ping engineers improve the shaping and internal weighting of the club heads.

674951f5ff1328d61acb5742010a5ae1

What the G fairway woods do share with the G drivers, however, is their high-friction face finish. Although it seems counterintuitive, the added face texture actually reduces spin rate when used on low-lofted clubs. The effect is most prominent in the 3 wood (14.5 degrees), which has four grooves, but no grooves in the center of the club face to increase the golf ball’s interaction with the rough surface at impact.

0ba53924d1cef3239554f3f35505de99

There are more grooves in the 5 wood (17.5 degrees, 5 grooves) and 7 wood (20.5 degrees, 6 grooves), which are spaced progressively closer together on the club face. According to Ping, the progressive groove design helps create more consistent launch conditions for each fairway wood.

c116a7dbba6387f4b059227b84a4f098

The G Fairway Woods are also offered in SF Tec models (16, 19 degrees). They have a center of gravity (CG) that’s located more toward the heel of the club, which adds 5-8 yards more draw bias to the fairway woods. SF Tec models also have a slightly lighter swing weight (DO) and a more rounded, larger club head (180 cubic centimeters) that’s similar to Ping’s K15 fairway woods.

Ping G Stretch Fairway Woods ($287.50 MSRP)

Ping_G_Stretch_Overall

  • Loft: 13 degrees
  • Size: 184 cubic centimeters
  • Stock Shafts: Ping Alta 65, Ping Tour (65, 80)
  • Length: 43 inches
  • Swing Weight: D2

There is a subset of golfers less concerned with the versatility of their fairway woods, and more concerned with hitting them as far as possible. For them, Ping created the G Stretch, which has 13 degrees of loft and measures 184cc, 17cc larger than the 14.5-degree G fairway wood.

Ping_G_Stretch_address

The distance-focused design uses all the same technologies as the standard G, with the exception of its slightly more forward CG, which along with its lower loft helps reduce spin.

Ping_G_Stretch_face

Compared to Ping’s Rapture fairway wood, which was released in January 2014, the Stretch is 28cc smaller, making it more playable from the turf. Whereas the Rapture was made from titanium and tungsten construction, the Stretch’s club head is made with a 17-4 stainless steel body and a 455 carpenter steel clubface. Even at its smaller size, it will perform better on off-center hits than the Rapture, with a 6 percent higher moment of inertia (MOI), a measure of forgiveness. 

Ping G Hybrids ($247.50 MSRP)

5191a833cf56ba781989a75b4f55035f

  • Lofts: 17 (2), 19 (3), 22 (4), 26 (5), 30 (6)
  • Stock Shafts: Ping Alta 70H, Ping Tour 90
  • Length: 40.75 (2), 40.25 (3), 39.75 (4), 39.25 (5), 38.75 (6)
  • Swing Weight: D1

Ping’s G Hybrids are designed to help golfers do what they might not be able to do with their long irons – hit shots high and far from a variety of lies and have them stop quickly on the green.

b766083211cf4528abfe9318136ef5cd

By not painting the center of the grooves of the fairway woods and hybrids, the clubs appear to sit lower to the ground at address, improving golfer confidence.

To make them launch higher and faster, Ping engineers gave its new hybrids the same 455 carpenter steel club faces as the G fairway woods, reduced their crown thickness by 25 percent, and added a high-friction finish to reduce spin. The new faces saved 8 grams of weight from the G30’s face design, which was used to create loft-specific CG locations (more rearward in the low lofts, more forward in the high lofts) for each of the five hybrids.

2445e541312b8fc5ace51fd00cb1c4a6

Ping fans will be happy to hear that the looks of the G hybrids were inspired by the company’s highly regarded Anser hybrid, and the flatter, boxier face profile of the Anser is evident in the G hybrid at address.

6acb814802c7e0d16b3b91d74075579a

The G hybrid (left) and G30 hybrid at address.

Compared to the G30 hybrids, the G hybrids will produce approximately 1 mph more ball speed, a 0.25-degree higher launch angle and 300 rpm less spin. That should result in about 4 yards more distance, according to Ping.

b61e63f42631071113963f3d6bb45daa

And of course, for the first time, Ping now has a hybrid with Turbulators. 

Ping G Crossover ($247.50 MSRP)

4253bddc0cd37a2ebbac53cfec390eec

  • Lofts: 18 (3), 21 (4), 24 (5)
  • Stock Shafts: Ping Alta 70H, Ping Tour 90, Ping AWT 2.0 (steel)
  • Length: 39.75 (3), 39.125 (4), 38.5 (5)
  • Swing Weight: D1

Ping’s new G Crossover clubs are designed to fill the yardage gap that’s often created when golfers transition from their longest iron to a fairway wood or hybrid.

8cd0a3bec0068a7b0f03bcf4a660aff8

The clubs look a lot like oversized irons at address, but they’ll launch significantly higher and with noticeably more ball speed thanks to their hollow-bodied construction and 455 carpenter steel face inserts.

eeb0ed6f866f1c8eb9c09a96856bc373

The Crossover clubs are available in three stock lofts – 18 degrees (3 iron), 21 degrees (4 iron) and 24 degrees (5 iron) — and their selling point is their lower-spinning trajectory when compared to Ping’s G fairway woods and hybrids.

d33dc264b3f0b116c784a8176e251c24

The clubs can also be bent to specific lofts and lies, and they have the flat-face design certain golfers prefer to hybrids and fairway woods.

4248dcd3fa6a584f5b40a5ebeafa2aef

The Crossover clubs are also much more forgiving than their iron-like looks indicate. According to Ping, they have a 31 percent higher MOI than the company’s Rapture driving iron, released in July 2013. To put the MOI difference in perspective, it’s like comparing the company’s blade-like S55 irons to its super-game-improvement G Max irons.

Related

Your Reaction?
  • 203
  • LEGIT26
  • WOW22
  • LOL0
  • IDHT4
  • FLOP9
  • OB0
  • SHANK14

34 Comments

34 Comments

  1. GG

    Apr 13, 2016 at 2:51 am

    Bought the standard G 3 Wood last month and it is awesome! I planned on getting the XR as I had hit it well before and I love my Big Bertha Alpha, but after hitting this club it was an easy decision to go with the G Wood instead. I’m not a long hitter but consistently hit it 230 with a nice easy swing. Mishits go far enough and straight enough.

  2. KK

    Feb 7, 2016 at 1:00 am

    Crossover iron? I’m guessing “driving iron” was too confusing for most golfers. I will have to look into this beast because my normal 5 iron left something to be desired and my new 5 hybrid as well.

  3. Alfredo Smith

    Jan 29, 2016 at 6:52 pm

    Ok I’m glad we got through all of that, now back to the Ping clubs. I have hit the all 3 clubs, the driver didn’t beat out my old driver for forgiveness but the 3W & Hybrid were absolutely off the charts on forgiveness with a little more distance. My fitter says and I will agree, that the fairway woods and hybrids will be popular in 2016, you gotta hit them!

  4. Fahgdat

    Jan 15, 2016 at 2:45 am

    Will there be 6 and 7 Crossover irons?

  5. cubigred

    Jan 12, 2016 at 5:56 pm

    I’m surprised Ping chose to put the club number on the bottom of the iron instead of the loft. Is 24 degrees really a 5 iron? For those that care about how clubs look at the bag drop (not me of course), do I really want the world to see my two five irons (pairing with my 26 or 27 deg 5 iron)? It seems like they are not maximizing their appeal.

    • Eric

      Jan 18, 2016 at 12:09 pm

      You’re completely missing the point. It’s not about the loft, it’s about the distance the club goes. There are so many variables that you need to consider.

  6. Will

    Jan 11, 2016 at 4:00 pm

    The crossover clubs look eerily similar to the Adams A7OS transitional hybrids, which are VERY easy clubs to hit…

  7. Poppa

    Jan 11, 2016 at 2:23 pm

    What

  8. Poppa

    Jan 11, 2016 at 2:22 pm

    Crossover looks like Rapture DI. Are those fitting cart screws in the heel?

  9. Poppa

    Jan 11, 2016 at 2:19 pm

    Are those fitting cart screws or “Parson Tungsten Screws” in the Crossover?

    • Scooter McGavin

      Jan 13, 2016 at 9:24 am

      I would guess neither. That may just be the access port where they can add hot melt to adjust the weight at the factory… Or something like that…

  10. Dlygrisse

    Jan 11, 2016 at 1:48 pm

    These are some of the most ignorant comments I have ever seen. Really? REALLY? shouldn’t be on the course till you can break 90? Tell me this hot shot…..how do you learn to break 90 till you have spent time on the course?

    Attitudes like this are what turn people off from the game. BTW, I have played with people who shoot 110 who play faster than scratch players. My guess is pro golfer is one of “those golfers”

  11. Paul b

    Jan 11, 2016 at 12:57 pm

    Fact. 95% of all golfers NEVER break 100. Of the 5% that do 95% of those never break 90. Golfers are all fisherman. Lies lies and more lies. Next time you golf with guys you have never played with , ask them what they shoot. All will say 80s,90s, none will say 100 or more. Watch
    Them move their ball for better lies. Give themselves gimmes from 4 feet etc.

  12. John

    Jan 11, 2016 at 11:41 am

    That crossover is going for a test run! I hope it is as good as it looks.

  13. Mark

    Jan 11, 2016 at 11:20 am

    Disappointed. My faithful G25 replacement won’t be anything with bumps on the top of it. And they have also ruined the clean look of the hybrids as well. They will sell but not to those of us who like our clubs to be gimmick free.

    • Bibby@aol.clm

      Feb 14, 2016 at 12:58 am

      Your g25 is a pancake. These woods are deeper (taller face). G25 were unworkable

  14. west

    Jan 11, 2016 at 11:11 am

    LOVE those little bumps on the crown…said no one ever.

  15. Keith

    Jan 11, 2016 at 9:13 am

    “For most golfers, fairway woods and hybrids play a relatively limited role during a round of golf.”

    Your definition of “most golfers” is one with which I’m not familiar.

    • Eric

      Jan 11, 2016 at 9:58 am

      Cuz most golfers suck and shouldn’t be golfing, they should be at the range.

      • Progolfer

        Jan 11, 2016 at 10:33 am

        EXACTLY. If you cannot break 90, you have no business being on a golf course.

      • Billy

        Jan 11, 2016 at 12:26 pm

        I dun think there will be anybody breaking 90 if they are new to the game?

        So u started at the 80s? Impressive

        • Progolfer

          Jan 11, 2016 at 4:46 pm

          Howiejr, I think golf is suffering in interest level because a round of golf takes WAY too long (4-5 hours or longer), and people don’t have the time to play. That’s mostly because of one thing– poor golfers. Also, a lot of poor golfers or beginners quit the game because they get so frustrated playing golf and getting bad results. I think the game would grow tremendously if golfers had to pass a skill test before ever stepping foot on a golf course (an etiquette lesson, too). People not interested would quit and that would stop wasting everyone’s time and make everyone happier. Plus, those people could just go to the driving range and have fun. Those interested who cannot break 90 yet would have something exciting to work towards, and those people would probably end up spending MORE money on the game by going to the driving range during free time, and probably make them healthier by giving them more daily exercise. Ultimately, everyone would be happier and the game would be stronger than ever!!

          • Aaron

            Jan 11, 2016 at 5:46 pm

            I was wrong when I posted on another article being the worst comment that I have ever heard. What you have just posted is by far the worst thing ever written on here and we are dumber for having read it. The fact that you refer to yourself as “Progolfer” and the demeaning way you refer to people trying to grow in the game reeks of arrogance. The world of golf is not all about you sir.

          • andy c

            Jan 11, 2016 at 8:34 pm

            yeah this just doesn’t make sense (besides the etiquette part, i think more experienced golfers should fill someone in who is not cohering to etiquette on course unknowingly). i was a beginner not to long ago, and the only way i got better was actually teeing it up and playing. the range for a beginner can only do so much, i know all i use to do was see how far i could hit it, and how fast i could tee up another ball. Breaking 90 is literally impossible for anyone who is first stepping on a course, and if some jackwagon like you is blowing his stack because the beginner in front of him is having a hard time its just makes it all the less fun for all. What I do think would help the game for beginners would be to follow the tee it up initiative or find a par 3 course to learn the fundamentals of the game on a non intimidating lay out. I played the same 9 hole crummy par 3 over and over, and it really did me well, and i was glad there wasn’t a guy pretending to be a progolfer behind me.

            • Progolfer

              Jan 12, 2016 at 12:09 am

              You people are pathetic, and that includes GolfWRX. I wrote a long response which apparently the GolfWRX editors screened and didn’t allow me to publish. I’m done with this thread and I don’t have to defend myself, especially to people like you. I’m going back to my amazing life, which was built on the pillars of honest, hard work. Have fun, because I know I will!!

              • Chris

                Jan 12, 2016 at 8:23 am

                Good riddance! The GolfWRX community will be better off without you and your arrogant attitude.

          • La

            Jan 13, 2016 at 11:48 am

            @Progolfer,
            I get the time thing, but fat lazy people are happy enough to sit through a 4 hour NFL or MLB game on a Sunday. Golf takes too long? Ha. It’s more that people are lazy, and they would rather not have to be bad at the game and embarrass themselves and prefer to sit at home and be lard

          • djdrb

            Mar 7, 2016 at 3:42 pm

            You are an idiot.

  16. Bobby Stevens

    Jan 11, 2016 at 9:01 am

    Waiting for a Tour Pro to put the Crossover in their bag. Until then, I won’t buy it.

    • cliche

      Jan 11, 2016 at 10:39 am

      since i’m not a tour pro… this looks really nice and i will try it as soon it hits the shops

    • Kevin

      Jan 11, 2016 at 12:04 pm

      Wow. I hope you are being sarcastic. Regardless, you’re in luck because I guarantee a PING staff player will game this in 2016!

    • Jay

      Jan 11, 2016 at 10:08 pm

      Because you only play what tour pros play?

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Equipment

Puma unveil new Ignite NXT Crafted footwear

Published

on

Puma Ignite NXT Crafted footwear

Puma Golf has launched its new Ignite NXT Crafted footwear – a new version of the NXT with premium leather accents.

The upper of the shoe features a premium leather saddle wrapped around Pwrframe reinforcement. The Pwrframe TPU is an ultra-thin frame that is placed in high-stress areas of the upper for lightweight in a bid to offer added support and increased stability.

Puma Ignite NXT Crafted footwear

The new additions feature Puma’s Pro-Form TPU outsole with an organically-altered traction pattern, containing over 100 strategically placed directional hexagon lugs in proper zones, designed to provide maximum stability and traction.

Puma Ignite NXT Crafted footwear

The Ignite NXT Crafted footwear contain a full-length IGNITE Foam midsole, wrapped in Soleshield in design to offer maximum durability, comfort and energy return. Soleshield is a micro-thin TPU film that is vacuum-formed around the midsole designed to make cleaning off dirt and debris effortless.

Puma Ignite NXT Crafted footwear

Speaking on the new Ignite NXT Crafted footwear, Andrew Lawson, PLM Footwear, Puma Golf said

“The Ignite NXT Crafted perfectly fuse the beauty of handcrafted shoemaking with modern development techniques to deliver optimum elegance and peak performance. With the combination of style and performance these shoes will appeal to a wide variety of golfers – those who appreciate the classic look of a leather saddle shoe and those who value modern comfort and stability technologies being a part of their game.”

Puma Ignite NXT Crafted footwear

The Ignite NXT Crafted shoes are available in 4 colorways: White-Leather Brown-Team Gold, Black-Leather Brown-Team Gold, Peacoat-Leather Brown-Team Gold and White-Hi-Rise-Team Gold) and come in sizes 7-15.

Puma Ignite NXT Crafted footwear

The shoes cost $140 per pair and are available online and at retail beginning today, June 5, 2020.

Your Reaction?
  • 15
  • LEGIT4
  • WOW1
  • LOL0
  • IDHT1
  • FLOP1
  • OB0
  • SHANK3

Continue Reading

Equipment

What GolfWRXers are saying about the best Nike driver ever

Published

on

@ukgolfclubsales

In our forums, our members have been discussing Nike drivers. WRXer ‘DixieD’ is currently building up a Nike bag and has reached out to fellow members for driver advice, and WRXers have been sharing what they feel is the best Nike driver ever made.

Here are a few posts from the thread, but make sure to check out the entire discussion and have your say at the link below.

  • Ger21: “VR Pro LE? I have two I was still playing last year.”
  • mahonie: “The STR8-Fit Tour was one of the best drivers I’ve played. Still have it the garage and take it to the range occasionally…it would possibly still be in the bag if it hadn’t developed a ‘click’ in the head which I cannot fix. Long, straight(ish) and nice sound.”
  • jackr189: “The VR_S is one of the best.”
  • Finaus_Umbrella: “I played the Vapor Fly Pro, and still do on occasion for nostalgia sake. Sound and feel are great, but it demands a good strike.”
  • PowderedToastMan: “I enjoyed the SQ Tour back in the day, the one Tiger used forever. Do I miss it? Not at all, but it was a pretty good club for its time.”

Entire Thread: “Best Nike driver?”

Your Reaction?
  • 11
  • LEGIT0
  • WOW0
  • LOL3
  • IDHT0
  • FLOP2
  • OB4
  • SHANK10

Continue Reading

Equipment

What GolfWRXers are saying about driving irons for mid-handicappers

Published

on

In our forums, our members have been discussing whether mid-handicappers can benefit from a driving iron. WRXer ‘jomatty’ says:

“I average about 230 off the tee on good drives. I can get a little more sometimes, but 230 is probably the average. I’m 42 years old and shoot in the mid to low 80’s. I do not get along with fairway woods very well, especially off the tee, and really don’t get enough extra length over my hybrid to consider using it aside from very rare situations on par 5’s (I’ve considered just going from driver to 19-degree hybrid and getting an extra wedge or something).”…

…and wants to know if he would be better served by a driving iron. Our members have been sharing their thoughts and suggestions.

Here are a few posts from the thread, but make sure to check out the entire discussion and have your say at the link below.

  • MtlJeff: “If you can shoot mid 80’s, you probably hit it well enough to hit a bunch of different clubs. Personally, I think hybrids are easier to hit….but some driving irons are quite forgiving. I use a G400 crossover that is very easy to hit and looks more iron-like. Something like that you might like. Be careful with some of them though because they aren’t always super forgiving, so you’d have to hit them first.”
  • HackerD: “G410 crossover is my version of a driving iron, feel like I hit it straighter than a hybrid. Just as easy to hit as a hybrid.”
  • hanginnwangin: “I shoot in the low 80s normally and in the 70s on my really good days. I have probably around the same or similar swing speed as you. I have been hitting my 4 iron off the tee on tight holes, and it’s been working pretty well so far. I hit it about 190-220. I have a 4 hybrid but just can’t hit it as consistently as the 4 iron, and it doesn’t even go much farther. I have a 5 wood which I only use for 220+ yard par 3s or wide-open fairways. Basically, it’s all personal preference and what you do best with. Everyone is going to be different. Try new stuff out and see what works. But if irons are the strongest part of your game (they are for me as well), I would give the 4 iron a shot. You can get a lot of roll out on the tee shots with it,”
  • Hellstrom: “Don’t laugh, but I bought a 17* hybrid with a senior flex shaft at a garage sale for $5, and I can hit it nice and easy and keep it in play without losing any distance. My driver SS is between 105 and 110 usually and swinging this thing feels like swinging a spaghetti noodle, but it works. I don’t have it in the bag all the time, but I do use it for certain courses. I take my 6 iron out and throw that in, so if I struggle with getting the ball off the tee, I just go to that.”

Entire Thread: “Driving iron for a mid-handicapper”

Your Reaction?
  • 8
  • LEGIT0
  • WOW0
  • LOL1
  • IDHT0
  • FLOP1
  • OB0
  • SHANK0

Continue Reading

WITB

Facebook

Trending