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Review: Callaway MD3 Milled wedges

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Pros: Options are plentiful with the MD3 Milled wedges. There are three different sole grinds, two finishes and a wide range of lofts (46-60 degrees). Low-lofted, mid-lofted and high-lofted wedges are each equipped with a distinct groove design that’s tailored to shot-specific needs. 

Cons: Wedge heads are not able to be customized with stampings, engravings or paint fill. Unlike Callaway’s Mack Daddy 2 wedges, the MD3 Milled are not forged. 

Who they’re for: Anyone can play the MD3 Milled wedges, especially with the addition of the wider-soled “W Grind.”

The Review

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  • Lofts available: 46, 48, 50, 52, 54, 56, 58 and 60 degrees
  • Grinds: S Grind (46-60), W Grind (54-60), C Grind (56-60)
  • Finishes: Matte Black (46-60) and Satin Chrome (46-60)
  • Price: $129.99
  • Stock Shaft: True Temper Dynamic Gold S300

New and improved are popular terms in the golf equipment world, but generally there’s more emphasis on the “new” part than the “improved” part. Fortunately, what’s new about Callaway’s MD3 Milled wedges also offers noticeable improvements over previous models from the company.

So what’s new and improved about the MD3 Milled wedges? Here are five things to know about them.

Throwing weight around

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Each MD3 Milled wedge has four colored ports in its rear cavity. Weight was removed from those areas to give the wedges a higher-toe design that moves the center of gravity (CG) higher for a slightly lower launch and more spin — exactly what the best golfers want from their wedge shots.

For me, it wasn’t the fact I could hit the 58.9 S Grind with as much spin as I wanted; it was the ease with which I was able to alter the trajectory. With the 54.12 W Grind, I had no problem hitting the ball high to front pin locations, or flighting shots that minimized the effect of the wind.  

Shot-specific grooves

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All 54- and 56-degree (pictured) MD3 Wedges have Callaway’s 20V grooves.

With the MD3 Milled, Callaway offers three specific groove patterns to optimize launch and spin based on the loft of the wedge. Pitching and gap wedges (46-52 degrees) have Callaway’s 30V grooves, which have 30-degree side walls that perform best on the more aggressive, downward strikes that are common with the clubs. Mid-lofted wedges (54-56 degrees) use Callaway’s 20V grooves, which have 20-degree side walls that excel on bunker shots and full swings. Lob wedges (58-60 degrees) have Callaway’s 5V grooves, which create maximum spin on shots around the green.

In testing, I was most impressed with the 5V groove, which does a remarkable job moving additional moisture and debris away from the ball. That came in quite handy when navigating juicy lies around the green. 

More refined grinds

The MD3 wedges are available in three distinct sole grinds: S Grind, C Grind and W Grind. My thoughts on each are below.

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S Grind: The “S” is the most versatile of the three available grinds. I’m tempted to say that S stands for “Swiss Army Knife,” as there was no shot I couldn’t hit with the grind. It was the most consistent grind on full swings from the fairway and tight lies, and more than held its own out of both light and deep rough. There’s no doubt that the S Grind will fit the majority players, and there’s absolutely nothing wrong with bagging the S Grind in two, three or four different wedges, depending on your bag setup.

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C Grind: This grind offers more heel and toe relief than the S Grind, creating an effectively thinner sole that excels in firmer conditions. While it doesn’t play nice with steep angles of attack, the additional relief in both the heel and toe did keep the head moving through the rough and allowed the leading edge to sit nicely under the ball at address — especially on open-faced shots. That adds versatility for golfers who hit a lot of specialty shots around the green.

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W Grind: The W Grind is ideal for bunker play, messy lies and players with steep attack angles. It was my favorite grind, because it seemed to get better the closer I got to the hole. Out of both light and deep rough, the W Grind operated like one of those old ginsu knives, but without the lame sales pitch. Getting up and down from gnarly lies around the green felt entirely too easy. And if the lie was clean and the turf was on the softer side, I had no problem hitting aggressive shots with a square or opened club face because I knew the wider sole would resist digging. Especially on less-than-full shots from inside 100 yards, the W Grind quickly earned the go-to spot in my bag.

Two finishes

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The MD3 Milled’s Matte Black finish (above) will wear and rust over time, while the Satin Chrome, which is plated, will show less wear but produce slightly more glare on sunny days.

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Although the MD3 Milled wedges aren’t forged — they’re cast from 8620 steel — both finishes felt fantastic with an edge in softness going to the Matte Black.

Looks to get emotional about

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At Address: A 58-degree S Grind.

Last but not least, the MD3 Milled are an awesome choice if you favor a teardrop shape at address. In that regard, the MD3 Milled approaches aesthetic perfection. The slightly raised toe and marginally straighter leading edge, compared to previous models, gives the wedge a clean look that balances angular lines with subtle curves.

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Notice the added sole curvature visible at address in this 56-degree wedge, which is a result of its C Grind.

For all the time we spend looking at the face of the wedge, many golfers are concerned about the appearance of the club as it sits in the bag. Some will call the cavity of the MD3 Milled is a bit gaudy, but others will see the four luminescent ports and green accents as fun and recognizable. 

The Takeaway

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The W Grind will work best for golfers who play golf in soft conditions, as well as those looking for improved sand play.

The MD3 Milled are the best production wedges Callaway has released in the past decade for a variety of reasons. At $129.99, the three distinct grinds and two finish options should cover the needs of most interested golfers. The shaping of the wedges is also so beautiful at address, and I found them to look and feel as good as leading wedge models.

The lack of custom options — stampings, paintfill, etc — isn’t a deal breaker, but does leave some room for improvement. At the end of the day, however, wedges should judged on how they perform. With an improved weighting scheme and loft-specific grooves, Callaway put performance first with the MD3 Milled and it won’t go unnoticed.

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I didn't grow up playing golf. I wasn't that lucky. But somehow the game found me and I've been smitten ever since. Like many of you, I'm a bit enthusiastic for all things golf and have a spouse which finds this "enthusiasm" borderline ridiculous. I've been told golf requires someone who strives for perfection, but realizes the futility of this approach. You have to love the journey more than the result and relish in frustration and imperfection. As a teacher and coach, I spend my days working with amazing middle school and high school student athletes teaching them to think, dream and hope. And just when they start to feel really good about themselves, I hand them a golf club!

30 Comments

30 Comments

  1. Matt Wiseley

    Sep 11, 2015 at 7:25 pm

    Great review Chris. I have the Mack Daddy wedges (54 and 58) and I hated them in the beginning. I had Ping wedges last season and these certainly are smaller. After a couple rounds I really began to love these wedges. So….if you don’t like them at first, wait and they will grow on you.

    My one complaint, full shots with the 54 spin way to much. Seriously, hard to keep on green sometimes…I have to flight it down to get it to stop where it hits. Anyway- great review as usual.

  2. Laurence of Arizona

    Sep 11, 2015 at 12:45 pm

    Have not hit the new MD3s, but I’ll stick with the forged MD2s as I love the forged feel. Had Voleys for years, very nice wedges just always felt real head heavy to me. Prior to MD2s I used the Taylor made xFT TPs which I really liked! Maybe it’s the KBS tour shafts that make the difference for me!

    • Wayne

      Jun 25, 2018 at 8:10 pm

      You have not hit them, we dont care about anything after that thanks

  3. other paul

    Sep 9, 2015 at 2:28 pm

    When I showed my wedge to my golf instructor he said “What is that? Its not even forged” I holed out with that club more times then I have with all other clubs combined in twice as much time. And my short game is better now. I wish I had kept that thing. A shot on the sweet spot has felt the same with my md2, and vokey.

  4. Charlie

    Sep 8, 2015 at 2:57 pm

    Want that head more upright or flat? Nope.

    Want that head bent a couple degrees to match your set? Nope.

    Want a bit better feel around the greens. Nope.

    On other words…nope.

    • Joe

      Sep 8, 2015 at 8:53 pm

      did you post the same thing in the vokey thread? Because my 54* SM5 is bent to 55*. You’re simply off base. Is the hood of your car forged? Because I can bend it.

  5. Martin

    Sep 7, 2015 at 10:04 pm

    None of the big wedges are forged.

    I looked at these the other day in Golftown, I suspect one will find it’s way into my bag. I love my original MackDaddy 11 60.

  6. Stephen

    Sep 7, 2015 at 5:26 pm

    The only major oem that still forge wedges is mizuno, vokey wedges are cast just like most others now.

  7. Joe

    Sep 7, 2015 at 3:50 pm

    I REALLY wanted to love these. No hating. I hit them next to my SM5’s and they simply didn’t feel good. Matter of fact I thought they felt bad. Maybe ill give them another test later but I really didn’t care for them in my first test. Anyone else? I was on green grass for my test. Maybe just an off day or simply “not what i was expecting”.

  8. John

    Sep 7, 2015 at 2:11 pm

    Going to be a hard sell because they’re not forged. Price makes up for it though.

    • BcavWecllh

      Sep 7, 2015 at 11:20 pm

      Most wedges aren’t forged these days. Hasn’t hurt Vokey!

  9. lou

    Sep 7, 2015 at 1:15 pm

    Not forged?? Then no thanks.

    • Brian

      Sep 7, 2015 at 5:15 pm

      You average an extra 15 feet from the pin if your wedges aren’t forged. That’s just science.

      Actually I bet most people couldn’t tell the difference if WRX didn’t point it out.

    • john

      Sep 7, 2015 at 10:31 pm

      i bet you play cast Vokey’s thinking they’r forged lol

      • lou

        Sep 7, 2015 at 11:16 pm

        I recently purchased one of the MD2 wedges and can totally tell. If you go to the range for a few hours 3-4 times a week and practice wedge shots 60% of the time you can tell. If you are a weekend player you can’t. I can tell and forged matters. Problem is their price point is already so high, to manufacture them forged would put them outside the competition’s range. That’s the problem when you are paying Cleveland a dump load for marketing. Wedge design hasn’t changed, but minimally, in decades. There is no reason to have his name on the brand except for marketing.

    • Chris Nickel

      Sep 7, 2015 at 10:38 pm

      I don’t fully understand this perspective…How many major OEM’s have forged wedges? Moreover, how much more would you pay for a forged MD3 wedge?

      • BcavWecllh

        Sep 7, 2015 at 11:18 pm

        i think only Mizuno wedges are forged .

        • Mike

          May 26, 2016 at 8:48 am

          Bridgestone wedges are forged and they are not expensive. IMO – most underrated OEM club maker.

      • lou

        Sep 7, 2015 at 11:30 pm

        The MD2s are forged but the PM MD wedge is cast. I’m going to guess if you are drilling holes in the back of the club a cast process is cheaper.

        There is a major difference in feel between the two. Manufacturers are going cheaper and keeping their prices the same. This is about dollars and profits. The $150 price point is a wall they don’t want to cross as it chases most people away. So, like every other industry, the product quality goes down the toilet while the price stays the same.

      • Simon Jones

        Sep 8, 2015 at 7:26 am

        I pay around US$ 250 for Miura forged wedges, hand finished by Miura-san and his team in Japan. They’re perfect and, with the right shaft set up, deadly accurate.

        Cast clubs, including Vokeys, feel like shovels by comparison. If you really can’t feel the difference then you’re simply not a good ball striker

        • Chris Nickel

          Sep 8, 2015 at 12:49 pm

          I’ve found very little, if any difference, between cast and forged – Given that the wedge (loft, lie, length, shaft flex, bounce/grind) are fit to the player. The fact Vokey is #1 on the PGA Tour and Callaway is #2, I believe is testament to this.
          In fact, I’d argue the better ball striker you are, the less of a difference you’ll notice – the sweet spot tends to feel pretty pure on every club, when correctly fitted. But I guess if you’re paying twice as much per wedge, it’s important you feel there is some benefit. Thanks for the comments!

          • lou

            Sep 8, 2015 at 9:12 pm

            Seriously? The PGA Tour Pros have sold their soul for millions. They play those clubs because that is their contract. Only a handful of the best of the best can tell their contracted manufacturer, “to go pound sand they are playing something else.”

            • Chris Nickel

              Sep 8, 2015 at 10:32 pm

              Maybe this is a better debate for the forums – but I think there’s a great conversation here b/c you’re absolutely correct in that “pay for play” does impact player choice, but how long can a player stick around if their equipment doesn’t allow them to perform at an elite level?

            • Mike

              May 26, 2016 at 8:51 am

              That is a bullcrap comment. I see a lot of major OEM players using something other than the OEM they are signed up with. Vokey is #1 on tour but Titleist is NOT the number 1 iron on tour. Interesting?

              Just get off the forge vs. cast debate and just play golf.

          • Philip

            Sep 10, 2015 at 12:13 am

            Can I feel the difference between cast and forged – depends on the forging and the metal used. I have a forged Nike that feels cast, a cast Ben Hogan that feels forged, and a forged Callaway that feels forged (as well as my Mizunos). I agree that a strike from the sweet spot is pretty darn similar between all clubs, metals and designs – of course, at this point we “all” know that the feeling of a club is based mainly on the sound and I would argue the shaft too as the vibration goes up to your hands. I know some people speak of cast clubs grooves lasting longer, but based on my worn out Mizuno T11s the verdict is still out on that one for myself. Now a scratch golfer – that is another level. Personally I don’t like the bling direction, but I understand why.

        • scott

          Sep 10, 2015 at 6:50 pm

          YEAH…. Thats why ALL the PGA palyers are rockin Miura wedges….oh wait, they aren’t….they play Vokeys…NM

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Equipment

WRX Spotlight Review: UST Mamiya Attas 11 shaft

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Product: UST Mamiya Attas 11 shaft

Pitch: From UST: “A revolutionary combination of innovative shaft design and advanced carbon fiber materials. We combined aerospace grade M40X Carbon Fiber with a new constant taper design. Designed for a higher launch, high performance shaft offering optimum flex and torque characteristics with feel. The ATTAS line has been a successful staple in UST’s offerings, and with the introduction of ATTAS 11 or “Jack,” this will be no exception. Designed to improve launch, but keep the stability the line is known for, this rendition enhances the line with better materials, better energy transfer, and an unforgettable feeling swing experience.”

You can find more info in our launch piece here.

UST Mamiya Attas 11 shaft

Our take on the 2020 UST Mamiya Attas 11 shaft

I was provided the Attas 11 6S weighing in at a raw weight of 66 grams, 3.8 degrees of torque, and profile promoting mid-spin with a mid to high launch. This shaft was placed in a Wilson Staff Cortex head playing 11 degrees with the weights in the neutral position and the sliding weight in the middle front location. The shaft was placed up against another UST offering: the Helium, which is a shaft that has been very popular and notable for its lightweight, but super stable design. I was also able to hit it against the Fujikura Atmos Blue Tour Spec 6S.

On course testing went right along with claims from UST. I experienced a good mid flight with notable lower spin than the Helium. The Attas 11 felt much stiffer than the Helium but not in a negative way. After a few rounds with “Jack,” I was impressed with the consistency I was getting in flight, control, and distance. My miss was predictable and controllable, whereas I have been having more of a two-way miss with the lighter Helium.

Review-UST Mamiya Attas 11 shaft

During an analysis at David Ayers’ Low Country Custom Golf with fitter and club guru Kristian Barker, we discussed shaft profiles and recorded some numbers to see how they compared. The first round was very subpar in terms of swing and after a round with all the shafts and a little guidance from Kristian, the second round was much better. I was very happy to be able to have a testing day where I can see how the equipment performed with bad and good swings.

ust-mamiya-attas-11-review

The Helium was the distance winner, but even though the offline number portrays better accuracy, I was having my typical two-way miss with both left and right big misses. The “Jack,” while a little shorter, gave me a consistent ball flight that was more likened to how I hit when I’m playing well. Also, though the Helium was a bit longer, that can easily be attributed to the fact that it is much lighter, and after the session, I measured it at 45.5 inches playing length whereas I had the Attas 11 cut to 45.

Overall, the Attas 11 is certainly a premium shaft that caters to those who would like a little higher launch without worrying about the spin getting too high or feeling overly stiff. On course and the launch monitor, this shaft performs and is every bit of what UST has marketed it to be in terms of launch, spin, and feel.

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Equipment

WRX Spotlight: EV3D putters

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We hear the buzz words “3D printed” all the time these days. It’s a newer technology that has shown to have lots of applications in other industries, but golf hasn’t been one of those until now. 3D printing a putter is a pretty new adventure, but EV3D Golf is showing that it is going to be much more common very soon.

EV3D Golf is bringing new putter designs to us golfers that CANNOT be made through traditional casting or milling. 3D printing is the process of creating a putter layer-by-layer, allowing any supported shape you can think of. Even hollow designs like EV3D’s signature lattice features!

This gives EV3D engineers the ability to create putters that push the limits of MOI, feel, and of course look. The intricate lattice design does more than just look really cool, it also helps move weight to the outside and rear of the putter, increasing MOI in all models. All EV3D putters are printed from a combination of 420 stainless steel and bronze. This alloy gives the putter its responsive feel, excellent durability, and the ability to offer 3 finishes. They also offer a ton of different hosel designs to fit your eye and putting stroke, all are 3D printed as well. EV3D even adds custom touches like text in the cavity, different site lines, and paint fill to make it your own. Right now they offer 6 different head shapes, but if none of those are what you are looking for, they will work with you to print your dream putter from scratch!

We got our hands on 2 models, the EV3D Golf Ares X and Hades, to take out to the course and putt with. In hand the first thing that grabs your eye’s attention is the intricate lattice work on the putters.

All you want to do is hold the putter closer to your face and see how the heck they did it. At the right angles you can actually see through that lattice structure, but we were told that debris getting stuck in there isn’t an issue. The next thing you will notice is the rough texture of the head. This is created by the process of 3D printing the head, showing off the layers of material used to build the shape of the head. I don’t know if was intended but that rough texture does help with reducing glare, making the putters easy on the eyes even in the brightest conditions.

I personally really like the Antique Bronze finish, but EV3D does offer a Natural and Slate Black finish to suit your personal taste. Out on the putting green the Ev3D putters performed really well, offering a hefty dose of forgiveness and a crisp feel and sound. Traditionally modes like the Hades don’t offer much in the way of forgiveness compared to mallets, but the Hades shocked me with its off-center putts. Putts hit off the heel or toe stayed on line much better and I even made a couple that had no business even being close to the hole.

Distance loss on those mishits is about what you would expect, coming up a little short, but defiantly not a drastic difference. Since the EV3D line doesn’t have any fancy face milling, I was a little worried about the initial roll and if the ball would hop or skid. Initial contact was great, only met with a tiny bit of skid before rolling out. Nothing that I think effected even my longest putts. The feel off the face is something that reminds you of a quieter classic Ping BeCu putter, crisp with an audible click. If you are looking for a silent impact, like an Odyssey Microhinge, then the EV3D line might not be your cup of tea. If you are on a quest for exceptional responsiveness on well struck and mishit putts then you should be very pleased with any of the EV3D putter models. The feel of impact is a little firmer than I think we are all used to these days with so many inserts and deep milling. The crisp feel and slightly more audible EV3D is somewhat refreshing and mishit putts are extremely easy to recognize.

Overall, the EV3D putters are a solid offering from a new company utilizing a new technology in the golf club space. With all the combinations of putter heads, site lines, and hosels, I can’t see you not being able to find a putter that fits your eye. Looks for any putter are going to be subjective, but there is no denying that EV3D is pushing the limits at a time where we see a lot of similar putter designs from all manufacturers. And if you are the type of person who wants to create an original design of your own that has never been done, EV3D is waiting for that call to help you take your idea from thought to printed putter head! Check the entire EV3D putter line at the company website.

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Apparel Reviews

WRX Spotlight: Adidas TOUR360 XT Twin Boa Golf Shoe

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The Product

The new Adidas TOUR360 XT Twin Boa, available in North America now, selling for $250 at adidas.com (only available on Adidas’ website, this shoe will not be at retail).

The Pitch

From Adidas: “The adidas TOUR360 XT Twin Boa® is the epitome of performance golf footwear, designed to offer micro-adjustability in two separate zones. The first is the independent main dial with high strength Boa lace that when combined with the forged 360 wrap creates unparalleled power for your swing by locking the area between your midfoot and forefoot. The second provides micro-adjustability from the middle to bottom instep for a customized fit, feel, and support. The Boa Fit System activates both zones to deliver the ultimate in power, stability, and performance.”

Our take on Adidas TOUR360 XT Twin Boa

BOA technology, a ratcheting cable system that replaces laces for securing the shoe, has been around for a while now. It was a radical departure when it first hit the market and traditionalists viewed it with some skepticism, but those who tried shoes using the system became hooked on the ease of use, secure feel, and reliability of the system. I have had to replace shoelaces, but I have never had a cable fail in a pair of shoes with Boa technology.

With the TOUR360 XT Twin Boa, Adidas has introduced the next step on Boa technology (pun intended). The shoe has a sleek, technology-forward look that is associated with Adidas products. It even looks good in the size 13 that I sport. The color selection is limited, to say the least. You can choose from white with green trim or white without green trim. But the star of the show is the Boa technology, which is implemented in two dials located on the outside of each shoe, replacing the one dial on previous iterations.

Each dial controls the fit for a different part of the shoe, and the ratcheting dial gives the wearer the most precise fit available. The real advantage over laces is that the Boa system stays secure longer and is easier to tighten than re-tying shoelaces. It’s so easy to reach down and give a couple of clicks that it became routine for me to check on each tee box to make sure I had a good fit before teeing off. Equally pleasing is the quick release on each dial that gets you out of your shoes at the end of a round without the terror of facing a wet double-knot.

The shoe is waterproof leather, and it is light and comfortable enough to walk 18 on hilly tracks. I personally would have preferred a slightly wider toe box, but that is nit-picking.

Overall, the Adidas TOUR360 XT Twin Boa is a performance shoe that promises, fit, comfort and stability, and it delivers on all fronts. Not everyone has $250 to drop on a pair of golf shoes, but if you want the tech on your feet to match the tech in your bag, then the Adidas TOUR360 XT Twin Boa is perfect for you.

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