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Review: FlagHi App

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Pros: An easy-to-use app that incorporate elevation, humidity and temperature into yardage to give golfers accurate distance measurements.

Cons: As with any product release, there are a couple small functionality issues that need to be addressed to improve user experience. Available for iPhone only.

The Bottom Line: This is a simple and logical app. At a reasonable price point, it will likely attract a wide clientele and will likely be more popular with competitive amateur and professional players.

Overview

Knowing how far you hit each club is integral to scoring. Most serious golfers are aware that changes in elevation increase or decrease carry distances by approximately 10 percent for every 5000 feet of elevation. That said, it’s doubtful avid golfers (competitive amateurs and pros included) have a working knowledge of the role temperature and humidity play in determining the flight of a golf ball. This app attempts to bring clarity to this relationship.

Common sense tells you that knowing how far you hit each club is important. Tiger Woods has been quoted as asserting the secret to golf is “being pin high.” Knowing how far you hit each club in your bag is absolutely critical to playing golf well, at any level. Need more? Bill Murchison of PGA.com said the biggest difference between tour pros and average golfers “is the ability to control their distances with their scoring clubs — in particular, their wedges.” If you want to make more putts, hit it closer. If you want to hit it closer, know exactly how far you hit each club!

Anyone can make something complicated. A true genius takes something complicated and makes it simple. Or so goes the thought process of FlagHi co-designers Mark Stratz and Nate Regimbal. After a golf outing to Bandon Dunes and 7&6 drubbing, Stratz couldn’t put his finger on exactly why he had played so poorly, but his distances were consistently inconsistent. One iron flew too far and then next came up well short.

Had Stratz played well that day he might not have woken up at 2 a.m. in a cold sweat screaming, “Eureka.” Okay, that didn’t really happen, but Stratz’s frustration did lead to some late night thinking and eventually the “aha” that it’s not simply elevation that impacts how far a ball flies. If you really want to understand what’s happening to your ball you have to account for temperature and humidity as well.

Fortunately, Stratz knew someone who could take this concept and turn it into something palatable and perhaps profitable. Enter Nate Regimbal. Regimbal used his expertise from his days as an IBM software designer to build out a user interface and to develop algorithms that utilize condition differentials (and a bunch of other NASA type gobbledygook), which eventually resulted in the FlagHi app.

photo 2

The FlagHi App sells for $4.99 and the “Pro” version, which has the company’s patent-pending “PlaysAs” function, sells for $9.99. Both are available for iPhone in the Apple App Store. According to the company’s, an Android version is in the works.

The Review

Even if you aren’t the most tech savvy individual, this app is super easy to use. The first step is to input the “baseline” temperature, elevation and percent-humidity conditions for your home course. The average temperature and percent-humidity information can be found on any website that tracks historical weather data. For the elevation of your home course, you can also look it up online – or there are a variety of free apps you can download that allow you to measure the elevation yourself right at the course. From there, enter the specific carry distance for each club in your bag. You have now finished with configurations and are ready to go. As conditions change, simply input the new temperature, elevation or percent-humidity, and the app shows you the adjusted carry distance for each club. Once the app was set up it took me about 5 minutes to get comfortable moving between screens and features.

photo 4

That said, there are two tweaks I believe would enhance app usability.

  1. Prior to using the “PlaysAs” screen (the interface in FlagHi Pro where you enter the distance of a shot and the app then tells you the distance that it actually plays), the app requires the user to first input current condition data on the “Current Distances” interface, which doesn’t allow the “PlaysAs” feature to be used right away independently. I would recommend that the PlaysAs interface allow the user to enter the current playing conditions directly as to streamline this experience. 
  2. When you are on the “Current Distances” interface, if you change any of the current playing condition parameters, the app refreshes the screen and reverts to the default sort order – showing your longest club (probably your Driver). My preference would be to persist the displayed club when making changes, so that the effects of your tweaks to the current conditions can be seen immediately for the club you have displayed. This would allow you to more easily “play around” with the app and see how the playing conditions actually affect the carry distances of that club.

photo 3

If you’re trying to make a decision between the basic and pro version, and wondering whether or not the $10 is worth it, I’d suggest you pony up the $10. The “PlaysAs” feature is probably the most unique piece of this app and is only available on the Pro version. My hunch is that some of the usability issues will be addressed in the near future and for a one time cost of $10, the pro version will offer the user a more robust experience.

The Takeaway

The chief benefit for this type of app is clear to the competitive amateur, collegiate, mini-tour and professional golfer. However, if you’ve ever come up a yard short of carrying a hazard or flew a green and you claimed to have “over-pured it,” my hunch is this app has a lot of benefit for you. You might find yourself saying, “I’m not good enough to care whether my 9 iron goes 137 or 139.” It’s funny how much more people start caring when they know how far they actually hit each club. Golf is a game of inches, for everyone.

Moving forward,  I don’t think we’re far off from a synchronized GPS/laser rangefinder that incorporates this type of data to give players a true measure of both visual and theoretical distance in one device. I can see college teams, touring pros and competitive amateurs using this data as a means to prepare for particular courses, conditions and events. To that end, we’ve already seen players hire and invest is statistical breakdowns of particular segments of their games as a means to diagnose and improve. In this case, information is good. And you can’t get too much of a good thing, right?

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I didn't grow up playing golf. I wasn't that lucky. But somehow the game found me and I've been smitten ever since. Like many of you, I'm a bit enthusiastic for all things golf and have a spouse which finds this "enthusiasm" borderline ridiculous. I've been told golf requires someone who strives for perfection, but realizes the futility of this approach. You have to love the journey more than the result and relish in frustration and imperfection. As a teacher and coach, I spend my days working with amazing middle school and high school student athletes teaching them to think, dream and hope. And just when they start to feel really good about themselves, I hand them a golf club!

15 Comments

15 Comments

  1. Mike McLean

    Feb 18, 2014 at 12:19 pm

    To all golf enthusiasts, weekend rounders, golf tinkerer’s, and aspiring tour players: I finally had the opportunity to play two rounds with the FlagHi App this weekend. I saw an immediate improvement in my distance accuracy and felt more confident over every shot. The benefits became obvious on the greens as I rarely found my ball resting more or less than 5 yards away from the flag. As noted in some of the earlier comments, there is a little room to improve the user experience but even “As Is”, the FlagHi App brings a lot of useful information to your game.

  2. Josh

    Feb 12, 2014 at 12:25 pm

    This would be great if it could pull from the weather channel or a similar weather app. Then there would be no need to have to manually enter the information. Just open the app and it updates based on your GPS location. Just an idea. Neat idea though.

    • Nate

      Mar 2, 2014 at 12:05 am

      The roadmap includes APIs to feed the conditions directly into the FlagHi formulas – resulting in real-time condition-affected carry distance adjustments. Of course there will still need to be manual mode for those who are punching in the next day’s forecast and updating their yardage books prior to the round. Per my other comment and as Philip indicated below – the approach of entering in the conditions prior to the round and making note of updated carry distances is how several pros (and now several college players) are using the app.

      Thank you for sharing your thoughts on this – we assure you we are listening.

      Nate

  3. Steve Stratz

    Feb 10, 2014 at 12:36 pm

    Disclosure, Mark Stratz is my brother and I’ve helped him, Nate and FlagHi on the PR-front. However, that being said, I’m a 6.3 handicap and the app is just great data. I did a track man session at my home course for average carry distances and have been using it there. While, at this point, the distances don’t change much due to winter conditions, the PlayAs feature is like having a caddie tell you which club to pull. In my last two rounds (the first I’ve used PlayAs), I’ve had 22 holes where I could use it (full shot into the green) and I was FlagHi 20 of 22 times. Not always on the green — lefts or right — but the club it told me to pull worked! I’m headed to Vegas in less than 2 weeks and can’t wait to use it, as temperature should be at least 20 degrees warmer, elevation will go from 231 feet to 2,000 and I know I won’t be guessing which club to pull!

  4. MJ

    Feb 9, 2014 at 12:47 pm

    Well obviously this can’t be used during an actual tournament round, but when you are playing with your buddies and on your own in a non sanctioned round, it is fine. This is of course that your buddies don’t mind. I think it would be very beneficial to have this info on my home course, so I would know how far I hit each club. Has anyone used this? Is it worth messing with?

  5. Brandel Chamblee

    Feb 8, 2014 at 1:06 pm

    If you play golf in different areas the information provided is invaluable but you don’t need pay for an app to figure it out. All you need to do is figure out density altitude for wherever you are playing. For example, my distances are all calibrated in Palm Springs, where I live, during early summer when the temperature is around 100. There are many free apps to figure out density altitude and the one I use will automatically calculate based off the phones gps location and local weather. Even though Palm Springs is at 480 ft elevation my distances are all calibrated for 2500 ft density altitude which takes temp, humidity, elevation, and pressure alitude into consideration. Simply add or subtract 2% off your normal distances for every 1000ft of density altitude change. If I go play in monterey the density altitudes can be down around minus 500 ft even though it’s around sea level depending on the course. So for me that’s a 3000 ft change so I have to add 6 percent to my distance. At 200yds i need to play the shot like its 212 yds. Simply figure out the density altitude before a round and do the math on the fly.

    • Nate

      Feb 9, 2014 at 3:12 pm

      It is not entirely correct that the Density Altitude calculation factors in Humidity. Both the official formula, as well as the NWS approximation, assume “dry air”; humidity is not a part of the equation.

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Density_altitude

      But we note that the patent-pending FlagHi methodology takes the environmental factors into account to generate the relative distances, and any calculation of “density altitude” is just an intermediate step in the process.

      When designing the app and selecting which of the myriad “condition parameters” to incorporate into the 1.0 formulas, it was our belief that because Humidity is such an immediately observed and “felt” condition, that our customers would wonder why we had left it out had we gone with the Home/Away Density Altitude differential approach.

      And as you know, even though humidity changes do not have a large affect on ball carry, it still has an effect.

      Most of the golfers out there (and certainly ALL of Chris’s GolfWRX readers) could look up the numbers and put pencil to paper themselves.

      But we believe Nike absolutely nailed it with their “Play in the now” campaign.

      So from a convenience perspective, and leveraging technology, we believe people would rather just swipe their finger across the screen.

      You of course may continue with the pencil and paper approach. So…for those who choose to emulate you: Where exactly do you get paper made from Persimmons wood? 🙂

      BTW I was at PGA West playing in the member-guest just prior to the crowds showing up at the Humana. Conditions netted out to be essentially the same as San Diego EXCEPT as the temperature went from 45 – 75 I saw a six yard swing in my 8-iron from hole 1 to hole 18. Again we believe it’s all about this critical data but also the convenience.

      Cheers,

      Nate

  6. Nate

    Feb 7, 2014 at 4:16 pm

    Hi everyone, this is Nate from FlagHi.

    Huge thanks to Chris and GolfWRX for posting the review. And thank you all for your consideration.

    We are pleased to join in the discussion – we knew rules would come up!

    First of all, we note that we have at least three touring professionals who are using FlagHi regularly for tournament play. We do not believe they are using FlagHi DURING tournament play; it is used prior to the round only.

    So to be safe, FlagHi and FlagHi Pro users should not use the app DURING official tournament play, without prior consultation with the USGA or the local rules.

    However, it is our opinion that using the technology PRIOR to the round, as to make notes on the updated carry distances for your golf clubs, as well as to annotate a course distance booklet with the empathic PlaysAs distances, is entirely permissible – assuming that golfers and caddies are able to bring such “notes” on the course with them.

    This conclusion had been commented already: that players could write down the effects of the conditions, prior to the round.

    Our comments to excerpts of rule 14-3 and decisions made regarding that rule are below, and represent our thoughts on the matter. Our opinions have not been reviewed by credentialed experts on this rule or the decisions related to it. We are preparing materials to send to the USGA to get their official opinion on the matter. Since this is indeed FOAK technology, we don’t believe that current rules and decisions apply to the entirety of what FlagHi technology does.

    From https://www.usga.org/Rule-Books/Rules-of-Golf/Rule-14/

    Except as provided in the Rules, during a stipulated round the player must not use any artificial device or unusual equipment (see Appendix IV for detailed specifications and interpretations), or use any equipment in an unusual manner:
    a. That might assist him in making a stroke or in his play; or
    b. For the purpose of gauging or measuring distance or conditions that might affect his play; or
    c. That might assist him in gripping the club, except that:

    We note the following:

    Per USGA Decision 14-3/0.5, FlagHi, not having the automatic feeds for current conditions (like an API to a weather DaaS), would not be an instrument that measures current conditions. It only calculates the effects of the conditions as entered by a person; entered values are not validated as accurate.

    Per USGA Decision 14-3/0.7, FlagHi does not obtain distance information (like a GPS or range-finder does).

    Per USGA Decision 14-3/5, annotating a “Booklet Providing Distances Between Various Points” with the PlaysAs values for those distances, prior to the round, would not seem to be a violation of the rule since Distance booklets are annotated with this type of information already (e.g. “plays uphill” or “plays longer than it seems”).

    Per USGA Decision 14-3/5.5, the “distance calculation function” is referring to point-to-point calculation of distances. FlagHi distance calculations are not in this context of reading or recording two waypoints and then calculating the distance between them. Rather FlagHi takes a distance value and then, based on the difference between the current conditions and the golfer’s home course conditions (again as entered by the user), provides an empathic distance to the golfer – or what that distance means to them in terms of their home course conditions.

    Per USGA Decision 5-1e/2,FlagHi is not a gauge which determines conditions. It simply allows you to enter the values obtained by such a gauge, or values you enter via a guess (finger to the wind).

    So given all this, we’re not convinced FlagHi presents a clear rules violation across the board. Perhaps it would be disallowed during a round, since assurances could not be reasonably given that other mechanisms on the smartphone had been disabled.

    But we have little doubt in the viability of the use case whereby a pro golfer, or college team – or even amateurs – checks the forecast for tomorrow’s round, or the conditions immediately prior to play, and punches the numbers into FlagHi and then makes note of the effects of the conditions. We think that makes a lot of sense, and why we’re excited about the technology and eager to hear your feedback.

    For those following us on twitter, you’ll see the app provides pretty useful information: the elevation change alone, from last week’s event in Scottsdale to right now at Pebble – is knocking 5 yards off a 170 yard iron. That is a GREAT data point to have ahead of a round, is it not?

    Sincere thanks for all your considerations, and should we earn your business we thank you for that as well.

    Cheers,

    Nate

  7. Philip

    Feb 7, 2014 at 2:39 pm

    Using the app during a handicap round may be illegal, however, who says you have to. Enter the parameters before your round, note the adjustments for the day in your notebook, turn off your phone and play. You can even put in a few estimations based on average data if you are playing mid-morning to afternoon to account for the temperature changes.

    Of course, the usefulness of this information depends greatly on a players ability to play close to their yardages – this will not help a hacker.

  8. Zak Kozuchowski

    Feb 7, 2014 at 12:38 pm

    Most tournament players play far more recreational and practice rounds than they do tournament rounds. Understanding how much farther or shorter a ball might fly in different regions is huge for them.

  9. JHT

    Feb 7, 2014 at 12:30 pm

    “At a reasonable price point, it will likely attract a wide clientele and will likely be more popular with competitive amateur and professional players.”

    Why would you leave out the part where an app like this would be in clear violation of the rules? Even local rules allowing rangefinders or gps use *ALWAYS* stipulate that it can show distance only – thats why slope features are not tournament legal.

    Clearly against the rules yet you think it will be popular with tournament players?

    • JCorona

      Feb 7, 2014 at 1:27 pm

      but it is not illegal to use in practice…. see Zak’s comment above where he emphasizes REC and PRACTICE rounds……

      and that is why it will be popular with them… but alas, there is always someone who goes against the grain….

    • Chris Nickel

      Feb 7, 2014 at 3:23 pm

      Yes, please see Zak’s comments above – I didn’t think it was important to discuss the current rules as it would be understood that players would use this for tournament prep, practice rounds or novelty –

  10. Mat

    Feb 7, 2014 at 12:22 pm

    Can’t get too much of a good thing? This app is a clear rules violation. I am all for using distance measurements on a phone, which is also illegal in tournament play, but weather instruments are clearly banned. That you left this out of the article surprises me.

    • JCorona

      Feb 7, 2014 at 1:31 pm

      Yes, they should not have left it out but for the people who will use this app their common sense prevails…. I mean even YOU knew it was against the rules… do you really think tourney players would try and play the ignorant card???
      This will be a great tool in PRACTICE…. Most players don’t spend time practicing… they play… to which this app will simply be a waste of money or just a tool to show their buddies… but, if a serious player uses this app in practice it could help them in tournament play. Confidence is key….. so is reading comprehension.

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Equipment

WRX Spotlight: Adidas Crossknit 3.0

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Product: Adidas Crossknit 3.0

Pitch: From Adidas “Get outstanding energy return on every swing with these men’s golf shoes. The spikeless outsole flexes with your foot and is durable enough for everyday play, while a lightweight and water-repellent textile upper keeps your feet dry for all 18 holes. A TPU heel counter and polyurethane welds in the forefoot give you the stability you need to go long off the tee.”

Our take on the Adidas Crossknit 3.0 shoe

The Adidas Crossknit 3.0 is for golfers that love a modern looking golf shoe. These may not be for classicists, and not targeted towards an older clientele, but they are currently very popular with the younger generation, and it’s hardly surprising considering the sleek, trainer-like style.

Not only in the looks department, but the feel of these golf shoes is also unlike the majority of other options on the market. The Crossknit 3.0 is extremely lightweight, which adds to the trainer feel, and the comfort level of the shoes is fabulous. Much of that comfort has to do with the enhanced cushioning that Adidas has provided through their boost midsole. Billed as the companies “most responsive cushioning ever,” the Crossknit 3.0 will offer you as comfortable an 18-hole walk as is possible.

Performance wise, the puremotion outsole of the shoe offers excellent flexibility which adds to the comfort of the shoe, while also delivering superb traction.  Adiwear lugs, forefoot stability welds, TPU stability heel counter and a Torsion system stability bar are the technologies which Adidas has merged to create a spikeless golf shoe which rivals any other shoes turf interaction performance.

The Adiwear outsole adds to the durability of the shoe, and the breathablility, as well as the waterproof element, creates a beautiful blend of resistance and comfort.

The shoes come in five colors:  Dark Blue, Core Black, Night Met and Core Black, Grey Five, and Active Green.

At $150, Adidas has created an extremely flexible and unique looking golf shoe. The Crossknit 3.0 will be popular on the course as well as off it, thanks to the spikeless nature as well as the sneaker look and feel. Fashionable, current, excellent performance-wise (turf interaction in particular), and unrivaled in the comfort department, the Crossknit 3.0 is a shoe which won’t disappoint its target market in any way.

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Accessory Reviews

WRX Spotlight: Swag ball markers and divot tool

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Product: Swag ball markers and divot tool

Pitch:  From Swag: “Swag is the brand that isn’t scared to push the limits in a conservative sport that isn’t evolving to meet changing styles. We like to listen to music on the course, we want to be bold, we love having fun, we love golf, and we’re going to express that both on and off the course. We aren’t going to try to sell you on how great our proprietary materials are and we don’t need to rely on clever marketing to sell more. We’re a no BS company. What matters is that our putters feel good and in turn make you feel good when putting. We have some crazy ideas, we love to tinker, and we experiment on how to perfect everything we do.”

Our take on Swag’s ball markers and divot tool

Swag Golf is creating some of the most sought after products on the market right now, with their funky headcovers and putters all being in high demand. Well, the companies ball markers and divot tool are no different, both of which are easily identifiable as coming from this emerging company who create high-quality products.

The Skull is the companies flagship symbol, and their Stainless Steel Skull Marker their most recognizable marker. The skull marker features black and fluorescent paint, with the bright sunglasses on the marker giving it a vibrant look. 100% CNC milled, the tool contains the companies name engraved on the back of the marker.

A variation on the Skull Marker is the companies Rainbow Skull Marker. Just in case the black and fluorescent paint job on the former wasn’t flashy enough for you, Swag’s Rainbow Skull Marker will make sure to get you noticed, containing the same features as their Skull Marker with a Rainbow PVD finish.

Moving away from their Skull Marker’s, Swag’s St Paddy’s Day Cap Marker is more than worthy of a mention. Identical in size to a bottle cap, the St Paddy’s Day inspired marker features a hand polished golden finish, with the word Swag in green written on the front, while on the back the words “Swag Golf Co.” as well as the company’s philosophy “Don’t give a putt” featured.

The company describe their bottle cap/marker as not being the first bottle cap/marker on the market but “the best one” out there. While I can’t confirm how true that statement is, I can certainly say it is an excellent one.

Swag’s first divot tool is the DTF Divot Tool. Get your head out of the gutter, that stands for “Down To Fix”. The device comes in a black and lime paint job, and an impressive weight of 49 Grams which should ensure that it doesn’t go missing on you.

The divot tool, like their ball markers, is 100% CNC milled and made from 303 Stainless Steel. For a Swag product, the writing and branding on the tool is quite minimalist, and it is as clean and sharp looking a divot tool as I’ve seen from the 2019 releases.

As always with Swag products, the only issue is the limited releases and how quickly the items go, which is no surprise considering the unique products as well as the quality provided. They are, however, continuing to create and release more and more products and their website, as well as their social media sites, are all well worth keeping a close eye on if you’re looking to snag some of the companies top gear in the future.

 

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Apparel Reviews

WRX Spotlight: Etonic Stabi-Loud shoes

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Product: Etonic Stabi-Loud shoes

Pitch: From Etonic: “Throughout the years Etonic continued to achieve recognition for its footwear throughout the entire sports industry. From partnering with tennis legend Fred Perry to releasing the signature shoes of NBA All-Star Hakeem Olajuwon, Etonic has shown a passion and dedication to supplying athletes everywhere with the highest quality athletic shoes. Etonic continues to follow its commitment to athletes around the world by producing industry-leading activewear that allows you to achieve your best while feeling your best.”

Our take on the Etonic Stabi-Loud shoe

If you were to think of one Tour player which you would expect to wear the Etonic Stabi-Loud shoe, then who would you pick? I’m confident you all got it right. John Daly is partnered with both Etonic and Loudmouth who collaborated on this shoe, and you’d be hard pressed to find a golf shoe which represented his flamboyant style more than the Etonic Stabi-Loud shoe does.

Looking to create the loudest shoe in golf, Etonic did just that, with bold colors in a zebra style pattern. According to John Holst, VP of Sales for Etonic Golf,

 “The Stabi-Loud shoe is truly one of a kind. If you’re looking for an ultra-comfortable, high performance shoe that will stand out on the course, then look no further!”

What’s more, the color sequences they’ve paired together work excellently. The classic zebra look, the black and orange and particularly the companies deep red and black pattern which looks electric.

The shoes come in four different color schemes and are fully waterproof. The shoe also features a microfiber material which makes the shoe extremely comfortable as well as durable.

The shoe hits the retail market in May, and for those who admire the styles of John Daly, Ian Poulter etc. then you’re likely to love Etonic’s Stabi-Loud Shoe. It covers all the bases in terms of comfort, and if you’re looking to stand out on the course, this shoe will undoubtedly help you achieve that.

 

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