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The best golf clubs for the money

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What are the best golf clubs for the money?

It’s a common question golfers ask, and depending on your skill level and budget, the answer can vary greatly. So, to help you figure out what the best clubs for you are, we’ve broken it down into a few categories to help you in the decision making process.

Best golf clubs for the money

Beginner Golfer – Entry-level budget

Getting your first set of clubs is all about maximizing value to get enjoyment out of going to the course or the range and most often involves buying a complete package set. Could you go directly to a high-end fitter to have them set you up with thousands of dollars would of gear? Of course, but it would be like getting handed the keys to a supercar without ever having a driver’s license—drive over a few curbs with a starter car before taking those skills to a four-lane highway.

Now just because you’re looking at a box set doesn’t mean you don’t have options. Wilson, for example, offers various sized sets for golfers based on static height measurements—which is a perfect starting point. It’s important for you to start off on the right foot, and even if they aren’t a perfect fit, the closer you are to the ideal set will make getting started a lot easier and a lot more fun.

The other option is to buy used, and with so many resources available online including used specialty sites like GolfAvenue.ca, you can find clubs in the 5-plus-year-old category that are going to offer tremendous value if you know where to look. This way of shopping for clubs often requires a bit more research to make sure you are buying the best clubs suited for your game, but depending on what you buy, you could get many years out of clubs purchased this way.

Check out the podcast link below for the GolfWRX, On Spec Episode- Building a $500 golf bag:

Play a lot of golf, and looking for value

This is where I believe most golfers tend to fit in, and it is also where you have the greatest number of options when looking for equipment. The idea of value will mean different things to different people, but when looking to get the most out of your equipment, getting fit is going to offer the best long term value for your game.

Depending on where you are buying your equipment, you can still buy “new” but purchase a previous generation model to save sometimes up to 30 percent, and if you are one of the lucky ones that happen to fit into “off the rack” irons and wedges, minus a grip or lie adjustment, then you can once again shop for previous-generation gear and see huge savings while still getting the best equipment for you.

The other option of getting great value and great quality equipment is shopping DTC—direct to consumer. There are a number of brands that have forgone the traditional selling channels and allow you to purchase custom-fit clubs direct for up to half the cost of traditional manufacturers including Ben Hogan, New Level, and Sub 70. These brands offer top-of-the-line gear, but thanks to their marketing approach and streamlined operations you can get fantastic value and high-quality gear built just for you.

Play a lot of golf – spare no expense

If you fit into this category, you are going to have the greatest number of options when it comes to finding equipment. Just like with any consumer product/experience, this approach is the most expensive, but it also puts the highest value on maximizing performance over anything else.

The most common scenario is working with a brand agnostic club fitter and if you are looking for one near you, check out our GolfWRX best drivers of 2020 article for our list of some of the best club fitters and facilities in North America.  Brand-agnostic fitters won’t limit your set by brand and will instead go through every option within your fitting parameters to make sure you are getting the most out of your clubs.

The best golf clubs for the money but will ultimately be based on your budget but the price doesn’t have to be a reflection of the amount of fun you can have playing golf.

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Ryan Barath is a club-fitter & master club builder with more than 17 years of experience working with golfers of all skill levels, including PGA Tour players. He is the former Build Shop Manager & Social Media Coordinator for Modern Golf. He now works independently from his home shop and is a member of advisory panels to a select number of golf equipment manufacturers. You can find Ryan on Twitter and Instagram where he's always willing to chat golf, and share his passion for club building, course architecture and wedge grinding.

4 Comments

4 Comments

  1. Steve

    Jul 3, 2020 at 11:16 pm

    Agree…totally useless.

  2. Al

    Jul 3, 2020 at 6:20 pm

    I usually enjoy Ryan’s insight
    This article has no information this time , tho

  3. jay hall

    Jul 2, 2020 at 10:23 am

    What a totally pointless article. Useless, lets bin this writer.

    • Doug Hart

      Jul 3, 2020 at 10:49 am

      Agreed. Pure clickbait. GolfWRX forums are good. Most articles are worthless.

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Equipment

Blade vs cavity back style wedges – GolfWRXers discuss

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In our forums, our members have been discussing wedge style preferences. WRXer ‘Jjfcpa’ is curious to see what style is used by the majority of members and why, and WRXers have been sharing their thoughts on both types.

Here are a few posts from the thread, but make sure to check out the entire discussion and have your say at the link below.

  • cwik: “I play blade wedges personally. I don’t see any benefit from CB style wedges around the green or on partial wedge shots. I guess they could provide some help on full swing mis-hits, but I’ve never seen an improvement in overall scores when playing CB’s throughout the bag. The addition of CB wedges is unlikely to produce any scoring benefits for me over time as well.”
  • aaronpoling: “I played SM7’s, then went to MD 4’s, and have settled on CBX 2’s. I play G25’s so going with a CB wedge made sense to me. Both the SM7’s and MD 4’s were great feeling, but I needed something more forgiving, and while they don’t feel as great as the other, they are good!”
  • cactusgolf: “I can shank, thin, or fat any wedge. I’m just that good. I’ve played both CB wedges (CBX-type) and now my Callaway MD3s since they came out. I really haven’t noticed a noticeable benefit to playing one over the other as long as the bounce is right for the type of course and how I deliver the club to the ball.”
  • texas_tom: “I was just looking into this. I settled on a 50 degree GW CBX2 for pitch shots and bump and run and heavy grass. I have Vokey 54/58 for the “finesse” Lob and high soft shots. Of course, I blade the crap out of most of those, so I use my cbx more and more. I think the CBX has a higher swingweight? It definitely feels like it, I don’t feel as flippy with it.”

Entire Thread: “Blade vs cavity back style wedges”

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Equipment

Coolest thing for sale in the GolfWRX Classifieds (07/2/21): (Made for Tony Finau) Piretti Handstamped Matera Elite putter

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At GolfWRX, we love golf, plain and simple.

We are a community of like-minded individuals that all experience and express our enjoyment of the game in many ways. It’s that sense of community that drives day-to-day interactions in the forums on topics that range from best driver to what marker you use to mark your ball. It even allows us to share another thing we all love – buy and selling equipment.

Currently, in our GolfWRX buy/sell/trade (BST) forum, there is a listing for a 1 of 1 (Made for Tony Finau) Piretti Handstamped Matera Elite putter.

 

From the seller: (@Kaexo): “For sale only, no trades. I wanted to like it and use it for awhile but just can’t putt with it. It was originally made for Tony Finau and can be confirmed by Mike the owner of Piretti. Very light wear on the sole but Overall excellent condition. Only weight set is the blank aluminum which makes it 355g. 34″. 355g. 70? Lie. 2.5? loft. Black Piretti standard grip Full disclosure: I am out of town and won’t be able to ship until likely Friday next week but will try to do it sooner. $1200 OBO fedex insured.”

To check out the full listing in our BST forum, head through the link: 1 of 1 (Made for Tony Finau) Piretti Handstamped Matera Elite putter.

This is the most impressive current listing from the GolfWRX BST, and if you are curious about the rules to participate in the BST Forum you can check them out here: GolfWRX BST Rules

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Driver Reviews

GolfWRX Spotlight: Tour Edge Exotics C721 driver

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Tour Edge’s Exotics line of high-end golf clubs has been known for excellent fairway wood and hybrid performance over the years. The Chicago-based company has been consistently putting out high-quality products, and golfers are really taking notice. The new line of C721 drivers, fairway woods, and hybrids take yet another big leap forward from last year’s EXS line. 

The new C721 driver takes a lot of technology from the 2020 EXS line and further refines and expands on it. I know it is a little cliche when companies say every model is their best ever, but Tour Edge is 100 percent right this time.

When unboxing the C721 the first thing I noticed was the much-improved looks and shape over the previous Tour Edge drivers. The biggest change to my eye is the added bulge, giving a more rounded and softened topline.

The overall shape of the C721 is slightly stretched from front to back, giving it just a hint of a triangular look. The Ridgeback is a titanium spine flanked by two carbon fiber wings that add stability and forgiveness to the head, but they can also work together and an additional aiming device to ensure you are lined up down the center of the fairway. 

Getting the C721 out on the course is where you really start to appreciate all the technology that went into this driver. Well-struck shots are very long, very boring, and will hang with anything out on the market today. Center contact is rewarded with a long and very low spin shot that is just fun to hit.

The sound and feel are very solid, you can really feel the ball compress on the face as it leaves at high speed. The sound is more of a muted crack and much quieter than I anticipated. If you practice on an enclosed range your ears will thank you for your choice in drivers. Shots hit away from the center of the face retain a lot of ball speed and stay online really well.

My miss is low on the heel and those misses stayed in the air fairly well and went a good ways. Shots hit down on the heel or higher on the toe side still stay online really well due to the Ridgeback spine and rear weight. The C721 is just slightly higher than mid-launch for me, but the low spinning head never allowed my shots to balloon or rise even into the wind. I do wish the face was just a touch deeper as I had to play with my tee height in order to find the optimal setup. The better players will enjoy the neutral weighting and there seems to be very minimal draw built into the driver.

Overall, the Tour Edge Exotics C721 driver is a great club that will probably be overlooked by too many golfers. If you are looking for added distance, a lot of forgiveness and want to keep some money in your pocket, then you should seriously take a look at Tour Edge.

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