Connect with us

Opinion & Analysis

Miura’s COO, Bill Holowaty, talks signing Abraham Ancer and more

Published

on

In the wake of the news of Miura Golf signing Abraham Ancer as a brand ambassador and one of few paid staff members on any tour, our Director of Original Content, Johnny Wunder, caught up with Miura COO, Bill Holowaty, for the inside scoop.

Here is the convo.

JW: Bill, congratulations on signing Abraham, seems like a great fit for Miura and a good way to kick off 2019. What lead to formalizing this relationship with him, and was this something that had been in the works for a while?

BH: Miura Golf has never paid for play on professional tours, however, we have always made our products available to the best players. Abraham was introduced to Miura by Genaro Davila (our dealer in San Antonio) a several years ago and although he moved away from our irons for a short time, he made the decision to trust his game to Miura and for the last 2+ years, he has been playing Miura irons.

Late in 2018, we were working to expand our distribution reach around the world, and that included Mexico. From there, things moved quickly as we identified Genaro Davila and his business partner Gerardo Benavides (DSP Golf Mexico) as the right partners, and they reached out to Abraham to join their team. As the press release stated, this in really a new and special relationship we have created with Abraham.

JW: Is he required to play a certain amount of Miura clubs?

BH: Abraham has no parameters on the number of clubs he plays. But, he’s said on multiple occasions that he just wants to play the best forged irons. Miura! And we obviously have the best interests of Abraham at heart.

JW: In regards to his irons, he got fitted for the Miura MB-5005. What is it about that particular head that resonated with him? He seems to be a traditional feel player, so I’m assuming it’s not just the iron profile that caught his eye. Turf interaction? Flight windows he looks for?

BH: Yes. All those things. Abraham had previously played the CB-57s, but when testing new product, the MB-5005 ticked all the boxes. We had yet to introduce our newest model, the MC 501. Therefore, it’s understandable, given his recent success, that he would stick with the 5005s for now. But I wouldn’t be surprised to see the MC 501 in play at some point.

Ancer’s MB-5001 8-iron

JW: Will he be adding any utility clubs or wedges to the bag in the near future?

BH: The relationship we have with AA is fantastic. Although no plans to add utilities or wedges, he has been open to combining other Miura models in to his set.

JW: Does the Justin Rose Honma signing help you guys in building a bigger tour presence? Point is since they are both known as popular high-end Japanese companies, does the signing of a World No. 1 assist you guys in creating new conversations with tour players that would have been potentially difficult before? Thats form a craftsmanship/quality standpoint and leaving money out of it.

BH: Great question. Brand awareness has always been a challenge for Miura. The gear heads (a term I use affectionately) know Miura. But there are still many pros who do not. Again, this particular relationship is very unique, given Abraham’s involvement with distribution in Mexico. As far as the future is concerned, will continue to make the best forged irons available to golfers on all tours.

JW: Can we expect more signings like this in the future?

BH: Although we have no future signings in the works, the fact that we continue to receive inquiries from professionals on all the major tours suggests that you’ll be seeing more pros trusting their game to Miura in the near future.

JW: Does Abraham plan on sticking to his current set for now, or is he testing other products in the line?

BH: For now, he will be playing the 5005s, but it’s less about the model number and more about the Miura forging process. The consistency in feel and performance is what AA trusts. He has been enthusiastic about our entire line up and shown a willingness to test all our new offerings, including the CB-301, the IC-601 and our Tour Wedges. The Miura family has welcomed all his comments and looks forward to his input into future designs.

JW: Thanks, Bill! As always, great talking to you my friend.

Your Reaction?
  • 46
  • LEGIT9
  • WOW4
  • LOL0
  • IDHT1
  • FLOP0
  • OB0
  • SHANK1

Johnny Wunder is the Director of Original Content, Instagram Manager and Host of “The Gear Dive” Podcast for GolfWRX.com. He was born in Seattle, Wash., and grew up playing at Rainier G&CC. John is also a partner with The Traveling Picture Show Company having most recently produced JOSIE with Game of Thrones star Sophie Turner. In 1997 Johnny had the rare opportunity of being a clubhouse attendant for the Anaheim Angels. He now resides in Toronto, On with his wife and two sons. @johnny_wunder on IG

1 Comment

1 Comment

  1. B

    Feb 23, 2019 at 11:42 am

    It’s been a problem, because Miura has been a niche manufacturer making only a smaller portion of equipment compared to the major brands, and the prices therefore had to be that much higher. If Miura is going to be a player like the other companies, will we see prices come down to the levels of TM, Mizuno and Titleist and offer the same kind of shaft options in the catalogue? I doubt it, because you’re still going to want to be known as that higher end brand.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Opinion & Analysis

The Wedge Guy: What makes a golf course ‘tough?’

Published

on

I found this past weekend’s golf to be some of the most entertaining and thought-provoking of the season. While the men of the PGA Tour found a challenging and tough Muirfield Village, the women of the LPGA were getting a taste of a true championship-caliber layout at Olympic Club, the sight of many historic U.S. Opens.

In both cases, the best players in the world found themselves up against courses that fought back against their extraordinary skills and talents. Though neither course appeared to present fairways that were ridiculously narrow, nor greens that were ultra-fast and diabolical, scoring was nowhere near the norms we’ve grown accustomed to seeing on the professional tours.

So, that begs the question – what is it exactly that makes a course tough for these elite players? And is that any different from those things that make a course tough for the rest of us?

From my observation, the big difference for both the ladies and the men was the simple fact that Muirfield Village and Olympic shared the same traits – deep rough alongside each fairway, deep bunkers, and heavy rough around the greens. In other words — unlike most of the venues these pros face each week, those two tracks put up severe penalties for their not-so-good shots — and their awful ones.

Setting aside the unfortunate turn of events for John Rahm – who appeared to be playing a different game for the first three days – only 18 of the best male players in the game managed to finish under par at Muirfield Village. That course offered up measurable penalties for missed fairways and greens, as it was nearly impossible to earn a GIR from the rough, and those magical short games were compromised a lot – Colin Morikawa even whiffed a short chip shot because the gnarly lie forced him to try to get “cute” with his first attempt. If you didn’t see it, he laid a sand wedge wide open and slid it completely under the ball — it didn’t move at all!

On the ladies’ side, these elite players were also challenged at the highest level, with errant drives often totally preventing a shot that had a chance of holding the green — or even reaching it. And the greenside rough and deep bunkers of Olympic Club somewhat neutralized their highly refined greenside scoring skills.

So, the take-away from both tournaments is the same, the way I see it.

If a course is set up to more severely penalize the poor drives and approaches — of which there are many by these players — and to make their magical short game skills more human-like, you will see these elite players struggle more like the rest of us.

So, I suggest all of you think about your last few rounds and see what makes your course(s) play tough. Does it penalize your not-so-good drives by making a GIR almost impossible, or is it too challenging around the greens for your scoring skills? Maybe the greens are so fast and diabolical that you don’t get as much out of your putting as you think you should? Or something else entirely?

My bet is that a thoughtful reflection on your last few rounds will guide you to what you should be working on as you come into the peak of the 2021 golf season.

Your Reaction?
  • 37
  • LEGIT8
  • WOW2
  • LOL3
  • IDHT3
  • FLOP1
  • OB1
  • SHANK4

Continue Reading

Club Junkie

Club Junkie: My 3-wood search, Mizuno ST-Z driver, and Srixon divide golf ball review

Published

on

I am on the search for a 3-wood this year and talk a little about my top 3 that I have been hitting. Hit on the pros and cons of each option and what might be in the bag next week. The Mizuno ST-Z was on the course and a really good driver for players who want forgiveness but don’t need any draw bias. The Srixon Q-Star Tour Divide is a cool 2-tone ball that makes short game practice more interesting.

 

Your Reaction?
  • 2
  • LEGIT1
  • WOW0
  • LOL0
  • IDHT0
  • FLOP0
  • OB0
  • SHANK1

Continue Reading

Golf's Perfect Imperfections

Golf’s Perfect Imperfections: How to turn technical thinking into task-based think in your golf game

Published

on

The mind can only be in one place at a time at 40 bits of information per second. To build a golf swing this way would be like an ant building New York City this way: a most impossible task. When you are task-based you are using the human self-preserving system, that works at 40 million bits per second, choose wisely.

Your Reaction?
  • 0
  • LEGIT0
  • WOW0
  • LOL0
  • IDHT0
  • FLOP0
  • OB0
  • SHANK0

Continue Reading

WITB

Facebook

Trending