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Titleist’s 818 H1, H2 Aim To Be Golf’s Most Complete Hybrids

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A thread was started earlier this month in the GolfWRX Equipment Forum titled, “Anti-hook hybrids.” The original poster, JaNelson38, asked GolfWRXers for their recommendations for a hybrid with “little if any draw bias.”

“For the life of me, I can’t stop hooking the hybrids I play,” he wrote. “It’s starting to affect me mentally, as the 3-hybrid is an important club for me when I’m playing my home course.”

More than 60 comments later, JaNelson38 had countless leads from GolfWRX Members. Suggestions ranged from trying a handful of 5-year-old hybrid models to switching to driving irons. He was even offered swing advice.

Titleist’s new 818 H1 and 818 H2 hybrids were created with golfers like JaNelson38 in mind, and they’ll likely simplify future discussions. They’re the first Titleist hybrids to feature the company’s SureFit CG Technology, an adjustable-weight system that allows golfers to shift a hybrid’s center of gravity to encourage, or discourage, a specific ball flight.

818-H1-Adjustability

The 818 hybrids are also loft and lie adjustable through Titleist’s SureFit hosel.

SureFit CG, which is also available on Titleist’s 917 drivers and fairways, uses a weighted stick to adjust CG. The stick is inserted through an opening on the side of the hybrids that runs from toe to heel and is secured with a screw. Every 818 H1 and 818 H2 hybrid is sold with two weighted sticks: one that’s evenly weighted to encourage a straight ball flight, and another that’s heavier on one end to create either a draw- or fade-biased trajectory.

Using SureFit CG, golfers can encourage a draw by positioning the heavy end of the weighted stick on the heel side of the hybrid; they can encourage a fade by positioning the heavy side of the weight on the toe side of the hybrid. The CG difference between the two settings is approximately 1.5 millimeters, which will create about 4 yards of trajectory bias, says Stephanie Luttrell, Director of Titleist Metalwood Development. The stock weight of the stick is 14 grams, but heavier and lighter weights are available to accommodate custom club lengths, shafts, and swing weights.

Gapping Recommendations From Titleist

  • 25-degree 818 hybrid replaces AP1 4-iron for R-Flex golfers
  • 23-degree 818 hybrid replaces AP1 4-iron for S-Flex golfers
  • 23-degree 818 hybrid replaces AP3 4-iron for S/X-Flex golfers
  • 21-degree 818 hybrid replaces AP3 3-iron for S/X-Flex golfers
  • 23-degree 818 hybrid replaces AP2 3-iron for S/X-flex golfers

Learn more about Titleist’s 718 irons.

When the 818 hybrids were made available to PGA Tour players in July at the Quicken Loans National, Brendon de Jonge saw the benefits of the added adjustability first hand, Luttrell says. De Jonge had developed a tendency to hit his hybrid to the left, and at the time he had abandoned the 816 H2 hybrid he was previously using. Using the fade-biased SureFit CG setting in an 818H2 hybrid allowed de Jonge was able to fix the issue. He put a 19-degree 818 H2 in his bag that week.

The 818 H2 targets the needs of better players, with a compact, squared-off appearance. It’s the most popular Titleist hybrid on the PGA Tour by a wide margin. The vast majority of amateur golfers, on the other hand, will likely prefer the company’s 818 H1 hybrid. Although it’s smaller and more streamlined than the 816H1 hybrid it replaces, it has a larger, more fairway-wood like shape than the 818 H2 to offer a higher ball flight and more forgiveness.

According to Luttrell, golfers won’t notice much of a distance increase if they’re comparing the 818 hybrids to 816 models: maybe 1-2 yards. Where they should see a difference is in the consistency of the new hybrids, which is attributable to the movement of weight lower and deeper in the club heads. That boosts moment of inertia (MOI), a measure of forgiveness, by 10 percent over past models. It also boosts launch and spin of the clubs, leading to more “playable distance.”

“We weren’t looking to make these hybrids go significantly farther,” she says. “We wanted to deliver more consistent launch and spin.”

The 818 H1 hybrids are available in five lofts (19, 21, 23, 25 and 27 degrees). The 818 H2 hybrids are available in four lofts (17, 19, 21 and 23 degrees). They’re available for testing starting September 1 and will be in stores September 29.

Stock Shaft Options

818Hybrids-Group-Environmental

  • Mitsubishi Tensei Pro Red 50 Hybrid (L)
  • Mitsubishi Tensei Pro Red 60 Hybrid (A, R, S)
  • Mitsubishi Tensei Pro Blue 70 Hybrid (R, S)
  • Mitsubishi Tensei Pro White 90 Hybrid (S, X)
  • Fujikura Atmos HB Tour Spec Blue 8 Hybrid (S, X)
  • Project X Even Flow Blue 85 Hybrid (S)

Discussion: See What GolfWRX Members Are Saying About The 818 Hybrids In Our Forum. 

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9 Comments

9 Comments

  1. Teaj

    Aug 31, 2017 at 10:44 pm

    Tough crowd, though for those that commented in the thread it seemed like the author was putting them down.

    • OR

      Sep 1, 2017 at 1:41 am

      The author is a shill … soooo obvious

      • Chipnrun

        Sep 1, 2017 at 3:30 pm

        No he’s not. Don’t say things you know nothing about.

  2. Mad-Mex

    Aug 31, 2017 at 8:31 pm

    Think I’ll stick with my adjustable K-Sig Hybrid, the CG moves 1.75mm,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, Too soon?!?!

  3. Roger McIntosh

    Aug 31, 2017 at 1:15 pm

    “A thread was started earlier this month in the GolfWRX Equipment Forum titled, “Anti-hook hybrids.” The original poster, JaNelson38, asked GolfWRXers for their recommendations for a hybrid with “little if any draw bias.”

    “For the life of me, I can’t stop hooking the hybrids I play,” he wrote. “It’s starting to affect me mentally, as the 3-hybrid is an important club for me when I’m playing my home course.”
    ————————-
    Yes, the solution to JaNelson’s problem must be in the design of the hybrid clubhead.
    Titleist to the rescue with their adjustable clubhead that will solve all of JaNelson’s swing problems and all without messing around with his swing mechanics.
    Now that’s what I call advanced 21st century golf club technology. Just dial it in, what could be easier?!

  4. golfraven

    Aug 31, 2017 at 11:20 am

    They said the same about the 816 model, which currently is my least favorite club.

    • Roger McIntosh

      Aug 31, 2017 at 1:16 pm

      Yup, adjust the clubhead, not the golfer.

    • Boss

      Sep 1, 2017 at 3:29 am

      It’s my favorite. You just don’t know how to hit it

      • golfraven

        Sep 1, 2017 at 11:22 am

        Yeah, when I hit it, it goes like a dream. Maybe I just didn’t give it enough air time so when I pull it out of the bag it does not fule me with confidence. I just need to give it more love and attention I guess.

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Equipment

‘My brief blade experience’ – GolfWRXers react

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In our forums, our members have been reacting to an interesting experience WRXer ‘LongJohnPeter’ had when testing out blades for the first time. ‘LongJohnPeter’ writes:

“For reasons unbeknownst to myself, I have been obsessed with playing blades lately. So I took a trip to my local range today and picked out an old Lynx USA 7 iron blade from the rental rack (I don’t own a blade and had never hit one previously). While I did see a reduction in distance (more of a result of EXTREMELY crappy range balls and a 50 degree day), I couldn’t believe how much more consistent my face contact was, compared with my Ping Zing’s I currently use. And even on the few mishits, they weren’t punished nearly as bad as everyone and their mother said they would be, and I knew exactly what had happened and could adjust accordingly.

Anyone have a similar experience? Is this just a honeymoon phase? Or is the golfing elite trying to preserve the sanctity of blade irons?”

And our members have been reacting to the post and sharing their thoughts in our forum.

Here are a few posts from the thread, but make sure to check out the entire discussion and have your say at the link below.

  • uglande: “I switched back to blades this year (had not played them in decades), and I will never give them up. They are so pure and consistent and easy to maneuver. I prefer the thinner soles, which give me better turf interaction. Blades will never produce those nuclear shots that go 15 yards longer than you expected. And, yes, GI clubs help retain ball speed on mishits, but I would rather be 10 yards short of the green than in the bunkers or other garbage on either side of the green. And I certainly don’t want to torpedo one (happened frequently with my P790s) that goes over the green, which is always where the worst hazards lie.”
  • NotTheGuyOrAmi: “I ’m far from a technical expert, but I have concluded that increased MOI may give some incremental benefit, and of course less loft means clubs with a particular loft might hit father, but the point of most of the “improvement” in-game improvement irons is to allow people who hit the ground before the ball with a slow swing speed to get a better result from a lower center of gravity. This, by the way, is not a good thing.”
  • CCTXgolf: “For some people a smaller club makes them concentrate a little harder, and that extra little bit of concentration can certainly help you find the center of the club face more often. Problem is it’s tough to keep that going for 18 holes. Much less day to day. I just went to blades in my short irons (8-P) and don’t really find that much difference in those shorter irons. They sure are pretty though.”

Entire Thread: “My brief blade experience”

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Whats in the Bag

Charles Barkley WITB: The Match 3

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Driver: Callaway BB21 (9 degrees)
Shaft: Ventus Blue 6 X (@46.5″)

3-wood: Callaway BB21 (15 degrees)
Shaft: Ventus Blue 7 X (@44″)

Hybrid: Callaway Mavrik (19 degrees)

Irons: PXG

Wedges: PXG

Putter: PXG

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Whats in the Bag

Peyton Manning WITB: The Match 3

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Driver: Callaway Mavrik Sub Zero (10.5 degrees)
Shaft: Graphite Design Tour AD TP 6 X

3-wood: Callaway Rogue

Irons: Callaway Mavrik Pro (3-PW)
Shafts: KBS C-Taper Lite 110 S

Wedges: Callaway Jaws MD5 (50-10S, 56-10S, 60-10S)
Shafts: KBS C-Taper Lite 110 S

Putter: Scotty Cameron SB+

Ball: Bridgestone Tour B XS with #18

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