Connect with us

Opinion & Analysis

A Quick Nine: Jeff Herold Of Club Glove, Scheyden Eyewear, Offers 50 Percent Off

Published

on

One of my favorite things to do in “A Quick Nine” is to talk to the creative geniuses in the golf industry, the people who create the products that become a part of our golf and travel life.

Jeff Harold

Jeff Harold

Jeff Herold, the president and CEO of West Coast Trends Incorporated, is one of those people. You may not know his name, but you know Club Glove, and you’re going to know Scheyden (pronounced “Shade-in”) Eyewear. He is the mastermind behind both of those.

In this Q&A, I talk to Jeff about the amazing rise of Club Glove and what he is planning for an encore. We had a long chat (it’s been lightly edited for style and brevity), but make sure to read all the way to the end for the incredible discount Jeff is offering GolfWRX Readers through July 4.

Michael Williams: Jeff, I’ve been trying to get this talk lined up for almost two years.

Jeff Herold: I got to try to get a little surfing in in the morning, okay? And then sneak away and stay below the radar, but no. Great to be on the show. We’re having another fantastic year here art Club Glove and Scheyden Eyewear, and it’s exciting to chat with you about what we’re doing here.

Well, thank you, and again. If I wasn’t bitter before, I’m bitter now. You know, whenever I hear my Southern California friends talk about surfing and going to the mountains in the same day, it always serves to embitter me, but good. I’m happy for you though. Let’s talk a little bit about the origins of you as a person. I know you grew up on the East Coast. Tell me, where’d you grow up, and was golf, and sports, and all that thing sort of a part of your life growing up?

Well, I have a little different route to the golf world actually. I grew up in Buffalo, New York. I was born and raised there. I did spend a couple of years as a child in California actually, and so I always kind of knew that when I finished high school I was going to head West, and so that’s what I did. I drove across the country and took up surfing, and I took up golf at a little bit later age, and so I started golfing also in my mid-20s and fell in love with the game. That’s where the Club Glove name actually came from. I cut up an old wetsuit and kind of hand stitched a head cover for my golf club. That’s where the Club Glove name originally came from … because when I designed this little Neoprene head cover, everybody kept saying, “It fits the club like a glove, it’s like a club glove,” and so, you know, we kind of name our products that way too.

It’s like when I came up with the last travel bag, which is now has been the No. 1 travel bag in all of golf, including the No. 1 bag on tour for a couple of decades almost now. We call that the Last Travel Bag, because when we designed this I said, “You know, we’re going to make this bag so good it’s going to hold up over years and thousands of miles of travel.” Someone said, “It’s going to be the last bag you’re ever going to need.” Then I go, “Well, that sounds like a good name.” You kind of getting the feel of how we name things here?

I’m getting it. I think I can get into the process at some point.

Yeah. That’s kind of the origin, and so obviously the Last Travel Bag by Club Glove became an immediate hit. It was interesting how there was this niche that we found, and there was a need, and we started having tour pros call into the office. I’ll never forget. This was back of course in the 90s, and we had a little gal here that was working the front, and she yelled across the office. She goes, “Hey, Jeff. I’ve got a guy on the phone, says he’s a golf pro.” I go, “What’s his name?” I yelled across. She says, “Larry Mize.”

Oh. Nice.

“Yeah. He won the Masters about 10 years ago.”

Yeah. Take the call. Take the call.

I’ll take that phone call. You know, from that point on, oh my god, the number of PGA touring pros that we’ve had a relationship has just been phenomenal. It’s absolutely fantastic, and we love our position in golf. We’re not a big company. We’re tiny. We’re like a hundredth of the size of Callaway, but you know what? We come to work every day with a smile on our face, and 80 percent of what we sell is made in America, so it’s fantastic. You know what? We all make a pretty decent living here. You know? It’s very humble. If you ever came by our headquarters, you’d see a very humble operation. It’s very blue collar. Maybe I brought that from Buffalo with me. Who knows? You know what? We enjoy what we do. We love being a part of the business. You know, we’re making bags for Titleist. We’re making bags for TaylorMade. We’ve done bags for Ping in their college program, and so we’re kind of like Switzerland in this world. You know?

It’s completely neutral. I like that.

Yeah. It’s fun.

Jeff, you were talking about working with people in the 90s. Let’s get this straight, because it seems like Club Glove has been around since the time of like Ben Hogan or something, but you just really are getting started. You were founded in what, 1990, something like that?

1990 is when the company was founded. I started working on my first head cover designs in like ’89, and then I incorporated. I started out of a garage. It wasn’t even my own garage. I borrowed somebody’s garage. You know, I had no college training. I could not afford to go to college, and I didn’t want to go into debt deeply, but I figured out a couple of things. I figured out how to work a calculator and realized you have to have more money coming in than is going out. I also realized that if you design a product, it’s got to be something where people feel like they get their money’s worth and it’s an effective, trustworthy, and functional product. You know?

I think you’ve nailed that pretty good with your entire line. So, you started off with the head cover, but when did you get into the bags?

I started designing the Last Travel Bag, in 1996, and so I spent about nine months. First of all, we had a little sheath type travel bag, like everybody else did, and there wasn’t anything exciting about it. During that time what I thought is like, “I’m going to ask some people.” We went to one of the West Coast golf shows here, and I was asking a lot of pros that traveled a lot, I said, “What’s wearing out?” They said, “Oh. The corners. The handles rip off. The zipper breaks.” Golf travel bags when I came into it were kind of like a disposable item actually, and so by the fall of 1996 I had my finished product, and we officially introduced it at the PGA Show in 1997. That summer, late that summer, we did our first U.S. Ryder Cup team in 1997 for Tom Kite.

I mean, that’s an amazing turn around to have a product go from concept to Ryder Cup in that period of time. It’s almost miraculous.

Yeah. Exactly. We had about 18 months from concept to Ryder Cup. We hit one. We kind of struck it right, and the timing was right. Again, the golf travel bag industry, as you can imagine, when you’re on a flight, there’s 200 people on the airplane, and there might be three, four, five, or six people that have a golf travel bag on there, so it’s a small, little niche world. You know? That’s where we capitalized, and it was perfect, you know, me having no incredible business knowledge, no business degree, no money. It’s a good size for me. It’s grown. It’s been wonderful. We have about 50 employees, but we subcontract a lot of the manufacturing, our injection molding and things, and the fabrics that we buy. We figure we touch, because of all the paper products that go into the product, being everything made in America with our luggage and travel bag line, we touch probably about 500 American families that are somehow involved.

That is great. That’s awesome.

Jeff Herold: Yeah. I mean, the thread for our fabric is spun in Tennessee. It’s pretty cool.

Now, from the golf club bag cover that we know so well, you’ve expanded into this entire line of luggage that has become a must carry, not only for people who are golfers, but for basically anyone who wants to have premium luggage, travel gear, and that includes pilots and flight staff. I have to throw in there and inject that you are in fact a pilot yourself, so is that how you got integrated into that world, being a pilot yourself?

It sort of happened that way. Yeah. I had a couple of airline pilots that were my flight instructors, and they saw that I was building some pretty cool, you know, travel gear. They said, “Hey. You’re making stuff that lasts forever. Can you make a roll aboard or a carryon that works for us?” And so we did. We’re not huge in the pilot world, but we have, you know, a couple of thousand pilots wheeling our nags around, and they love it. We don’t hear from them, and so that means they’re happy. Okay? That also means that the product’s holding up, and these are guys that are traveling 250 days a year. By the way, they’re still wheeling two wheeled luggage around, not the four wheel, and there’s a reason for that. The four wheel is great inside the airport concourse, but it’s not so great out on city streets, as people that own that luggage know, so we stuck to the two wheel gear.

Then we also figured out, because of all the tour players and all the feedback, we developed a way to connect the luggage together, and that we call our Train Reaction System. Our luggage has become … now not only do we have the No. 1 golf travel bag on the PGA Tour, but we also have the number one luggage on the PGA Tour. Again, you might think that’s easy, but it’s not so easy, because these guys can have any luggage that they want, and they choose to use ours, and we don’t pay them a dime to use it. It’s pretty cool having that position out there.

The things is, Michael, is we’d like to get the rest of the world to know about this, and they don’t know yet. Now, the luggage, I will admit, it’s expensive. It’s like double the price of our golf travel bag, but when people ask me, “Why is it so expensive?” Well, once again, I have a problem making things that aren’t going to last people forever, and so I kind of over engineered this luggage, so it is for people … I didn’t want to have tour players having to call me saying, “Hey. I’ve got it. I need a luggage repair after … I know I’ve already traveled with it 35 weeks this year, but I had a zipper break.” Well, I’ve got guys that have been traveling with this on tour, guys like Henrik Stenson, Jason Day, Rory McIlroy, some of these guys have been traveling on tour with their gear for years now without a repair needed, and that’s why it’s a little more expensive, and that’s why if you’re a frequent traveler, it’s worth the extra money.

Now, one thing I’d love to do for your listeners is, because the TRS Ballistic is still relatively unknown, I need more people actually getting it in their hands, and using it, and doing testimonials, so I’d like to actually offer a discount code for your listeners, and I’d like to have you name it. Would you like it to be Mike50 or WRX50, or what do you think?

I am just in shock right now. I am humbled and honored to have this offer, and this is totally spontaneous, I want to let everybody know.

Oh yeah.

This is unscripted. You know what? Let’s go with GWRX50.

GWRX50. Okay. So, that’ll be a code. Now, that code is going to work for our new TRS ballistic Luggage. Okay?

Okay.

We have a separate website for that. It ends up going to our clubglove.com, but it’s trsballistic.com. It’ll just work for the new luggage. It doesn’t work for the golf travel bag, as you can imagine, because you can get the golf travel bag at your local country club, golf course, or retailer, Edwin Watts, Roger Dunn, Dick’s Sporting Goods. Places like that all carry the Club Glove line, Golf Galaxy. The TRS Ballistic line, okay, is not carried by most yet, because it just hasn’t resonated with enough people as to how good this stuff really is, even though the PGA Tour, they love it. You know, I might as well throw Dustin Johnson into that list, too, by the way, because that’s all he travels with, the Club Glove TRS Ballistic.

Wow.

The GWRX50, if they go onto clubglove.com and go to the TRS Ballistic, on the checkout that code will knock 50 percent off their Ballistic Luggage purchase.

That is awesome. Is everybody hearing this? Thank you so much, Jeff, for doing that. To my audience, you’re welcome. Okay?

And if any of my country clubs that carry it are mad at me for selling it at 50 percent off, just bear with me. We got to get more people using this, and more people are going to come ask for it then.

I will deal with you. I will handle any feedback you get from those guys. You direct them to me. Okay?

There you go.

We’ll take care of it. Okay? Club Glove security.

You know what I’ll do? I’ll put this code out until … we’ll just put it until July 4. I got to put a limit on it of course.

Beautiful. Done. Done. Well, look. I’m excited, because I know people now are going to want to click off and stop listening immediately and just go buy luggage, so let me just bang out a couple more quick questions here, so that everybody who’s listening can get done with this and go shopping. You’ve got this whole line of gear, which is awesome, when you look at the products online. I mean, it couldn’t be more impressive. You said you’re growing that business and making that particular top spin and stay up, and then you got into the eyewear with the Scheyden. How did that get started? Because as you told me before, that’s not really necessarily golf stuff.

No. No.

That’s kind of a different niche.

They say necessity is the mother of invention, and I took up flying back in 1998. I went to the PGA West Coast Show in Las Vegas, and I got stuck in a traffic jam. It was a seven hour trip versus four hours. Okay? I talked to some other folks who were going to the show, and they flew over in their little private plane. They said, “Ah. It took up 90 minutes.” I’m like, “Whoa. Whoa. Whoa. I like that,” so I took up flying in 1998, and got my pilot’s license, and partnered up with somebody on a small plane. While I was going through all that, I realized when I was flying and wearing a headset, there was nothing that was designed out there that was comfortable underneath the headset while you were flying. I thought, “You know what? I want to design an eyewear line for pilots,” and once again, because I like to do the best, and I like to make in America, I tried to get them made in America. I couldn’t find anybody who would want to manufacture them for me, so I flew to Japan, which is known as some of the best metal frame eyewear manufacturers in the world.

Interesting.

Scheyden's C130  ($309).

Scheyden’s C130 ($309).

Everything we do is handmade in Japan over there, and all of our metal frames are Titanium, because I wanted them lightweight. I wanted them comfortable. Then of course on the lenses I said, “I want the clearest composite lenses you can make, and I also want to offer glass, which is the benchmark in optical clarity,” so we have glass and titanium, I mean, two of the best materials you could ever have in a pair of sunglasses. That’s how it all started was, just again … You know? And we’re still making them. We do eyewear for the Air Force Thunderbird Team. We do aerobatic pilots. We have tons of general aviation pilots that use it. We have airline pilots. We also have a great line of glass polarized for fishing. We have some amazing kayak fisherman that just love our stuff.

You know, there’s no secret to it, Michael. All it is is saying, “Look. I want the best possible materials.” Does it come out a little more expensive? Of course it does, but once again, you get a titanium glass frame from Scheyden Eyewear, they’re probably going to last you many, many years if you take care of them.

In DC, we always define a nanosecond as the time between when the light turns green and when the car behind you blows its horn. It seems like there’s a nanosecond between the time that you come up with a product and a product is successful. I know that you have great quality products, but there has to be something about you that moves that product. What do you think it is about you that convinces people to come to this product and stay with it so quickly, or is there somebody else who’s the people person? Are you as good with people as you are with product, or what is it?

I guess it’s just passion. You know? Anything I design I put myself in the position of the consumer, and I say, “Look. If I was going to buy something to have this as a solution to a problem in this world, I want something that’s going to be of great quality and it’s going to work.” I’ve always, over the years, as you get older, and you learn, and of course if you get the ability to spend a little bit more money … As we get older, generally with increase our income, and now we can get a better car, or we can buy better tires. We can buy a little better … whether it’s a little better paint for our house, we realize that, “Okay. I want to spend a little more, but I want to get my money’s worth.” They always say, “You get what you pay for.” Not always true. We all know that, but more often than not, you get what you pay for.

Yeah. I guess that’s true. That really is true. In that sense, you’re kind of a throwback. You know? I mean, your products are new, and creative, and inventive, but in terms of that quality thing, you know, we’ve all sort of grown accustomed to the, quote unquote, planned obsolescence that the corporate world throws at us, so it’s nice to see somebody who’s going in the other direction.

Michael, so many of them are pressured by numbers, and I look at it as we don’t need to be billionaires here. In fact, it keeps the landfill even from … you know? You get a piece of luggage that lasts you for 10 or 20 year, guess what? It’s not in the landfill in two years. I mean, how much cheap luggage …? I mean, the luggage industries almost $40 billion. You know? Does $30 billion worth of luggage go in the garbage dump every year? What happens? Right?

Well, part of it’s in my closet. I can tell you that. I got one closet in the house that’s filled with luggage that’s never going to be used again, because it has a piece of damage or another that prevents it from being …

A broken zipper and it’s over.

Broken zipper, or a tear, or frayed edge, or broken wheel, you name it, I mean, a handle that’s broken. Yeah. You’re right. Some of it’s built, but it’s not really built to last, so it’s nice to know that somebody’s out there actually doing that, you know, for the customer. It’s kind of comforting. You know?

It sounds to me like we’re going to need to get you some TRS Ballistic.

Oh, dude. You have no idea.

I just gave you the code.

Ding. Ding.

You know what? I should do that code for the Scheyden Eyewear too, the same one. It’s a different website, spelled s-c-h-e-y-d-e-n, Scheyden, and people wonder where that name come from. It’s actually my son’s name. I made it up in 1995 when he was born. I couldn’t think of a name for the sunglasses, and somebody said, “Hey. You know, Jim Jannard, he started Oakley. He named it after his dog.” I said, “Well, I don’t have a dog, so I’ll name it after my kid. How’s that sound?” Everybody loved it, because you hear the word shade in there, Scheyden. They’re like, “It’s perfect for sunglasses. Why not?”

I was sure that you did this somewhere as a wordplay on the whole shade thing, but no.

Yeah. It’s just my son’s name, which kind of was a derivative of Hayden. I put a little German flare on there with the S-C-H, Scheyden, and that’s how it worked. If you go to scheyden.com and use the same code, the GWRX50, I’ll go 50 percent off on your Scheyden sunglasses. This is like an introductory deal. I want people to experience this wonderful gear that we make here. You know, what better way to experience it than half off?

We’re talking to Jeff Herold, of Club Glove and Scheyden Eyewear, here on the Price is Right, I mean, the 19th Hole.

By the way, I’m going to be honest with all the listeners. I did ambush Mike with this. He had no idea that I was going to give discounts.

Honestly. Look. Really. This is going to be the most popular show ever. Okay? I’m going to have to put at the beginning and the end that this offer is limited. You know? We’re going to have to put …

Well, you waited two years to talk to me. I might as well give your listeners a deal.

It’s well worth it my friend, well worth it. Look. I want to close out with you with a couple of questions just about you, really, and the stuff that you’re doing. I know you’re working with the Club Glove, and the sunglasses, and you have a little bit to do with OnCore, the guys who have the hollow, metal core golf ball.

Oh yeah. The OnCore guys. Well, I consulted with them years ago, about four years ago. They’re a nice group of folks out of Buffalo, New York, where I grew up. That’s kind of where the connection came from.

Okay. Buffalo.

Jeff Herold: You know what? Now, they’ve come a long way, and they have three different models, I believe, of USGA approved golf balls, and I’ve played … Their most recent golf ball, called the Elixr, spelled E-L-I-X-R. By the way, OnCore is spelled O-N-C-O-R-E. They first started with this hollow, metal core golf ball, which is a real interesting concept, real techy. Their Elixr though is their latest. They finally … I’ll be honest with you. They have a golf ball that’s pretty darn good for the price. I got to tell you. I’ve gone out, hit it, played with it, and I wouldn’t be embarrassed to give a dozen of these golf balls to any of my friends that are scratch plus one or plus twos. I wouldn’t be embarrassed at all to give them a dozen of those and let it have at it.

So, you’re dabbling with the golf ball business. Is there anything else that’s in the future?

Well, I’m really not. I’m not involved. These guys are just friends, and I consulted with them years ago, but it just came up in the conversation, being from Buffalo. You know what? It’s kind of an interesting thing to see a new golf ball company come around.

Fair enough. I would just say what else might be in the future, because clearly you have an eye for quality and for creativity? You see people doing things that are like apparel? There’s people who are putting out these luxury golf clubs. That seems to be the flavor of the day for guys to make these ultra luxury golf club sets. Any eye on going towards anything like that?

You know, Michael, I’m going to let that incredibly competitive world of hard goods, I’ll let them have at that. Of course everything’s competitive in this world now, these days, but you know what? My expertise is what I call caveman technology. Okay? I’ve got luggage that connects together in one of the most simplest ways you could ever imagine, and you can roll two or three pieces of luggage with one finger and talk on your cell phone, which is something that no one else can do. That’s kind of my niche and my love. Of course, same with the eyewear, too, making beautiful, handcrafted eyewear out of Japan that’s incredibly comfortable and very good, high quality. I’m going to stick with where I’m at, to be honest with you. I’m happy to help anybody else out that’s in the golf world, but I don’t see myself becoming a part of any other company out there, being that I have so much fun doing what I’m doing right now.

Awesome. Well, let me give you a couple of questions that are …? Because I’m a big fan of Inside The Actors Studio, James Lipton, and I want that job eventually, if he gets tired of it. I’m going to give you one of those type of questions. Where have you been? I know you’re a pilot, and you get a chance to go a lot of different places. Where have you been? Where haven’t you been that you’d like to go?

Where haven’t I been that I would like to go? Well, you know, I love to play golf, and I’ve never been to Augusta National to play there. I haven’t even gone there to see the Masters. I’ve been invited, but I’ve always told myself, “You know what? I’ve been to some of the most amazing golf events, two Ryder Cups, U.S. Opens,” and I thought, “If I go to Augusta, I want to go to play.” There’s that. Okay. Now, that’s on the golf side. Okay. There’s several other courses that I’d love to visit of course, and I know I’ve had invites from some of our golf pros in the past, and I haven’t taken them up on it, but then on the other side of the world would be the surfing. You know? I’ve been to Bali, which is amazing, over in the Indonesia area. I wouldn’t mind going to visit a couple more exotic surf spots. That would be on the list. Other than that, I’ve got to be honest with you, Michael, if I die tomorrow, I would have to say, “Man, what a great ride it’s been for me.”

Awesome.

You know, I don’t need a bucket list, because my bucket is overflowing with amazing experiences, and the world of golf, being in the golf industry has been one of the most amazing blessings that I could ever imagine. It’s the greatest industry in the world. It’s filled with people of high integrity. I can’t think of any other industry that has better people, and I don’t think anybody could think of any other industry that has better people than the golf industry.

Yeah. I’ve got to say ditto on that one. I’ve worked in some other industries, and I can tell you that in most places that you work, most other industries, you can meet a bad guy every now and then, and some of them pretty regularly, but you rarely meet a bad guy in golf. It just hardly ever happens. It’s kind of cool. I agree with you there.

No. It’s brutal. It really is brutal. Any game that allows you to keep your own score, that’s for me.

I like it. Well, let me give you one last one, which is for your all-time foursome. If you could play golf with three other people — and we have the the time machine working, so it can be anybody, anywhere, at any time — who’d be the other three in your all time foursome?

Oh, man. The all-time foursome.

You’re playing at Augusta of course.

I think I would pick the fun people, a couple guys that I’ve known for years. I haven’t talked to David Feherty for many years, but he’s funny as hell, and I would get him and Peter Jacobsen, who I’ve known also for years. I think there’s nothing better than going out to play a round of golf with people that have a great sense of humor, because golf is going to punish you. It’s only a matter of time, and quite often it’s right off the first tee. You take a punch right on the first tee. Right? You go, “Uh-oh, here we go. Here we’re in for a battle.” 18 rounds. 18 holes is like 18 rounds of boxing.

Well said. Well said.

I would probably pick those two and then maybe we’ll throw in … Oh, gosh. Who would I throw in there with us? There’s an endless number of tour pros, from Henrik Stenson, to Rory, Rory to Dustin Johnson, all these guys. I’d like to get one of the new, younger guys that’s up there in the top-10 in the world or something like that that’s got a great personality. They’d have to be able to put up with Peter Jacobsen and David Feherty though.

They have to be pretty patient. I get that.

Being at my level of golf, like most people, the last thing we want to do is go out and have four hours of seriousness.

Well, I can suggest for you one of my good friends, Lee Trevino. If you want to have fun on a golf course, dude, you could have fun at an insurance seminar with Lee Trevino. That guy is FUN!

He would be a great fourth guy to add to those guys. You’re absolutely right. I’ve had the chance to meet Lee … he gave me the idea for the Stiff Arm that goes in the golf bag. I made this retractable crutch basically to save the drivers, because Lee, he said, “You know what, Jeff? I put a tennis ball on the end of a broomstick.”

Wow. What?

But, you know, you cut one. It works for you, but I made the Stiff Arm, which fits anybody’s golf driver, no matter what, and it’s cheap insurance to save your driver. If you’re going to Scotland, and you’re going to play the old course, you want your drive to be there with you and not have the head snapped off. There’s no doubt about that.

I have one, and I wouldn’t travel without it. I have the Stiff Arm. I didn’t know that was you, but that’s you.

Yup. The Stiff Arm, what that did was it completed the soft sided bag. By the way, no one uses a hard case anywhere in professional golf, no one, because they’re a nightmare to deal with, but occasionally if they’re dropped on the club heads, the first thing to go is going to be the driver. It’s the longest club. The Stiff Arm is great insurance, and I always tell people, “If that Stiff Arm’s bent or it doesn’t retract anymore, or something like that, that means that was going to be your driver,” and so for $29, you can save your $600 driver and make sure it makes it to Scotland and back in one piece.

Once again, thank you for that, for inventing that, because I know you have saved my driver, for better or for worse. You saved my driver.

Perfect.

I really just can’t thank you enough, man, for taking the time to talk to us about all that you’re doing. First time, hopefully not the last time we get a chance to talk to you. Again, for listeners, I’ll repeat all these things we got. If you go to the websites for Scheyden Eyewear and for TRS Ballistic Luggage, enter the code GWRX50, you will get … We’re getting 50 percent off? Really?

50 percent off until July 4.

Blimey. Okay. Well, get moving, people. You’ve got your homework.

Don’t tell your head pro at your country club.

Yeah. With that caveat. You won’t get the 50 percent off. We’ll add 50 percent if you do that. How will we know? Don’t worry about it. We’ll know. Okay. We have our ways. Hey, Jeff. Thanks again so much for joining us, man, and we’ll hopefully see you out on the golf course sometimes soon. Right?

Hopefully so. Hitting them straight hopefully, too.

Related

Your Reaction?
  • 5
  • LEGIT1
  • WOW1
  • LOL0
  • IDHT0
  • FLOP1
  • OB1
  • SHANK8

Williams has a reputation as a savvy broadcaster, and as an incisive interviewer and writer. An avid golfer himself, Williams has covered the game of golf and the golf lifestyle including courses, restaurants, travel and sports marketing for publications all over the world. He is currently working with a wide range of outlets in traditional and electronic media, and has produced and hosted “Sticks and Stones” on the Fox Radio network, a critically acclaimed show that combined coverage of the golf world with interviews of the Washington power elite. His work on Newschannel8’s “Capital Golf Weekly” and “SportsTalk” have established him as one of the area’s most trusted sources for golf reporting. Williams has also made numerous radio appearances on “The John Thompson Show,” and a host of other local productions. He is a sought-after speaker and panel moderator, he has recently launched a new partnership with The O Team to create original golf-themed programming and events. Williams is a member of the United States Golf Association and the Golf Writers Association of America.

6 Comments

6 Comments

  1. Mike

    Jun 28, 2017 at 9:38 am

    Very interesting read. My Last Bag and Rolling Duffel have been all over the US and are going strong. I had a handle get cracked during travel and they sent out a replacement one the next day. That kind of service will keep me a customer forever.

  2. Dan Golfer

    Jun 25, 2017 at 6:01 am

    Inspirational success story! I always carry my golf clubs bag with me. I know it is hard to keep them safe but I do alway use Sun Mountain Clubglider Meridian. It weighs a little over 11 pounds which is very light considering it has extendable arms that make it easy to wheel around. For more detail on the bag check out http://www.grumpygopher.com/best-golf-travel-bags/

    • John

      Jun 27, 2017 at 9:03 pm

      Being like every other golfer and wanting to try new things I purchased the Sun Mountain Clubglider even though I already had a Club Glove Last Bag in the garage. What a mistake! Warranty nightmare, hard to use and not sure where you came up with 11lbs try more like 15! I have added the new Last Bag Collegiate to my arsenal and will never try those cheap chinese made travel bags again! Go USA!

  3. Rwj

    Jun 22, 2017 at 4:14 pm

    Carry-on bag is $699

  4. sam

    Jun 22, 2017 at 12:57 pm

    The backpack is intriguing but the website is so poor it gives zero info on the product. Amazon has zero reviews on it as well.

  5. Jim

    Jun 22, 2017 at 9:58 am

    Great article and interview. Nice to hear about someone who worked hard and came up with great ideas. I swear by the Last Bag, with the still arm, and the J hook accessory that allows you to pull your luggage and golf clubs through the airport with ease. And the train reaction works great too for luggage. Great products that last forever it seems.

Leave a Reply

Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Opinion & Analysis

The Wedge Guy: Do irons really need to go longer?

Published

on

At Edison Golf, we put high emphasis on getting the right lofts in our customers bags to deliver precision distance gapping where distance control matters most – in prime scoring range. Our proprietary WedgeFit® Scoring Range Analysis helps us get there, and one of the key questions we ask is the loft of your current 9-iron and pitching wedge.

Please understand I have been collecting this type of data from wedge-fitting profiles for over 20 years, and now have seen over 60,000 of these. What’s interesting is to watch the evolution of the answers to those two questions. Twenty years ago, for example, the 9-iron and PW lofts would typically be around 42-43 degrees and 46-47 degrees, respectively. By 2010, those lofts had migrated downward to 40-41 degrees for the 9-iron and 44-45 for the “P-club”. (I began to call it that, because it’s just not a true “wedge” at that low of a loft.)

But how far are the irons makers going to take that lunacy? I see WedgeFit profiles now with “P-clubs” as low as 42-43 degrees and 9-irons five degrees less than that – 37-38 degrees. The big companies are getting there by incorporating mid-iron technologies – i.e. fast faces, multi-material, ultra-low CG, etc. – into the clubs where precision distance control is imperative.

Fans, you just cannot get precision distance control with those technologies.

But the real problem is that golfers aren’t being told this is what’s happening, so they are still wanting to buy “gap wedges” of 50-52 degrees, and that is leaving a huge distance gap in prime scoring range for most golfers.

So, to get to the title of this post, “Do Irons Really Need To Go Longer?” let’s explore the truth for most golfers.

Your new set of irons features these technologies and the jacked-up lofts that go with them, so now your “P-club” flies 125-130 instead of the 115-120 it used to go (or whatever your personal numbers are). But your 50- to 52-degree gap wedge still goes 95-100, so you just lost a club in prime scoring range. How is that going to help your scores?

Please understand I’m not trying to talk anyone out of a new set of irons, but I strongly urge you to understand the lofts and lengths of those new irons and make sure the fitter or store lets you hit the 9-iron and “P-club” on the launch monitor, as well as the 7-iron demo. That way you can see what impact those irons are going to have on your prime scoring range gapping.

But here’s something that also needs to get your close attention. In many of the new big-brand line-ups, the companies also offer their “tour” or “pro” model . . . and they are usually at least two degrees weaker and ¼ to 3/8 inch shorter than the “game improvement” models you are considering.

But really, how much sense does that make? The tour player, who’s bigger and stronger than you, plays irons that are shorter and easier to control than the model they are selling you. Hmm.

It’s kind of like drivers actually. On Iron Byron, the 46” driver goes further than the 45, so that’s what the stores are full of. But tour bags are full of drivers shorter than that 46-inch “standard”. So, if the tour player only hits 55-60% of his fairways with a 45” driver, how many are you going to hit with a 46?

I’m just sayin…

Your Reaction?
  • 5
  • LEGIT0
  • WOW0
  • LOL0
  • IDHT0
  • FLOP0
  • OB0
  • SHANK1

Continue Reading

Opinion & Analysis

GolfWRX Book Review: Phil by Alan Shipnuck

Published

on

The most awaited golf book of 2022 is titled “Phil: the Rip-Roaring (and Unauthorized) Biography of Golf’s most Colorful Superstar,” featuring a look at Phil Mickelson’s life and times. Alan Shipnuck, long a respected writer in the golf interweb, has produced another long-form contribution to the vast library of golf tomes. Early leaks did nothing but heighten the anticipation of the residents of golfdom for the book’s release. Shipnuck wrote for GOLF Magazine for years, before heading out with other proven and decorated scribes to form The Fire Pit Collective. His place at GM reveals how he was able to get close to Mickelson and his inner circle. Before we continue on with the book review, it’s important to determine how Shipnuck and I have a cosmic bond. It is summed up in two words.

Bob Heppel

Bob Heppel was the guy who stood me up in the fifth grade, swim locker room. I swung and bloodied his nose. I was more stunned than he was, but I retired as a fighter with a debatable record of 1-o. Alan Shipnuck tells a similar story in the introduction to his most recent literary effort. No kindred-spirits malarkey here; the type of coincidence that the cosmos allow on occasion.

How does the book read? Well, it has an element of stream of consciousness, combined with a heavy reliance on anecdotal sequencing. It is necessary to stack story after story, to connect the dots of a sometimes-indecipherable image. That’s Phil, to a T (or a P.)

Back to me for a moment. I received the digital copy of the volume about three weeks before the release date of the paper edition. On Friday the 13th, I finally opened the PDF. As I held the PgDn button on my laptop, stopping intermittently to catch up, a random turn of phrase caught my attention:

a man’s man with big calloused hands and the briny demeanor that came from having been at sea for weeks at a time. 

It takes a special awareness of how language intersects with life to string words like that together. Those words describe one of Phil Mickelson’s grandfathers. Shipnuck gives us so much information on Phil’s ancestor that we forget for a moment, that this is a book about Phil. This is a good thing, because we need to learn about the others that helped to forge the Phil Mickelson from whom we cannot avert our eyes.

The chapter in the book that will most ally you as a Mickelson sympathizer is, predictably, the one about Winged Foot and the 2006 USGA Open. The one that will most distance you from Lefty, is the one that begins around page 150, concerning his gambling habits. The section that will have you question golf administrators in general is the one about the 2014 Ryder Cup. In other words, there are a lot of chapters that expect the reader to suddenly jump up and scream at anyone who will listen, You won’t believe this, but …

At times throughout the reading of this book, you feel like a student in a statistics class. The author presents anecdotal evidence in tens and twenties, and you try to determine if Phil Mickelson is enviable or pitiable; sincere or counterfeit; ultimately, good or bad. And then, Shipnuck delivers a knockout punch in which he melds the detached storyline of wealthy professional golfers with the reality in which the rest of us live. Shipnuck resists the temptation to offer too many of these body blows; the book is, after all, about Phil Mickelson.

At about the midway point of the book, it is revealed that Mickelson might have something of a James Bond complex, a need to put himself at greater risk than before, to determine if he can handle the pressure. This notion explains a purported interest in gambling, or a suggested enthusiasm for abandoning the US PGA tour in favor of mideast money; the latter would be the straw that broke the back of Mickelson’s most loyal sponsors.

Without giving too much away, nor attempting to drive the reader toward any sort of conclusion (which would probably have been impossible, in hindsight) there are two, late-volume sequences that lead us toward an understanding of Phil Mickelson and of Alan Shipnuck’s intent:

even Mickelson’s failings feed his image as an uninhibited thrill-seeker

This is the image that he has cultivated over the course of a lifetime. It is the gift that his parents and his grandparents bequeathed to him.

In his public statement, Mickelson allowed that his comments were “reckless” but couldn’t resist making himself both the victim and the hero of his narrative …

This statement reveals the cleverness of Shipnuck’s efforts. He allows the readers to determine which one Mickelson is. My guess is that the readership will be split down the middle. As if I needed to tell you, go buy this book. You’ll enjoy revisiting the glory days of the southpaw, but be warned: you won’t feel the same about him when you turn the final page.

Your Reaction?
  • 9
  • LEGIT4
  • WOW4
  • LOL0
  • IDHT1
  • FLOP1
  • OB0
  • SHANK5

Continue Reading

Opinion & Analysis

Viktor Hovland can dominate if he addresses this key weakness…and it’s not his chipping

Published

on

Ahead of the 2022 PGA Championship at Southern Hills, the expectations for star Viktor Hovland are sky high. Hovland is a native of Oslo, Norway but played his college golf at Oklahoma State University before turning professional in 2019.

During Hovland’s time as an amateur, he won the 2018 U.S. Amateur and earned invitations to the Masters, U.S. Open and The Open the following year. He became the first player to win low amateur honors at both the Masters and U.S. Open in the same season since 1998.

As if expectations for the 24-year-old weren’t already lofty enough, he is now returning to Tulsa, Oklahoma, as one of the favorites in a major championship in the state that he played college golf.

There is an argument to be made that Viktor Hovland is the most talented golfer on the PGA Tour. Since he arrived on the scene in 2019, the young phenom has dazzled the golf world with his tee to green excellence. He’s also become a fan favorite due to his abundance of charisma and infectious smile.

Hovland’s career thus far cannot be categorized as a disappointment. He has three regular PGA Tour victories: one at an alternate field event in Puerto Rico, and two at the Mayakoba Golf Classic. He also became the first Norwegian to win on the European Tour (Now DP World Tour) when he won the BMW International Open in June of 2021.

Despite the relative success, it would be hard to argue with the fact that something is missing.

In terms of skill set, one of the most accurate comparisons for Hovland is Rory McIlroy. By the age of 25, McIlroy had four major championships. It would be unfair to compare Hovland to McIlroy in terms of career trajectory, but I find it reasonable to expect more out of him.

Hovland will also draw many comparisons to Collin Morikawa. For better or worse, Viktor Hovland will always be mentioned in the same breath as Morikawa due to the fact that both golfers arrived on Tour at the same time, are within a year of each other in age and rank in the top five in the world.

For all of their similarities, Hovland and Morikawa are in many ways polar opposites. Hovland is a flashy, big hitting, birdie maker. Morikawa is steady, sharp, and has what I believe to be the highest golf IQ since Tiger Woods.

The Norwegian is every bit as talented as his friend and rival, but Morikawa has five PGA Tour victories, including two major championships and a World Golf Championship victory. Hovland is still searching for his first win in a marquee event.

Much has been made in recent months about Viktor Hovland’s troubles around the green. The 24-year-old has lost an average of 1.0 stroke to the field in his career in Strokes Gained: Around the Green. Hovland will be the first to tell you that he has a major weakness in his short game.

“I just suck at chipping,” The Norwegian said after his first career victory at the Puerto Rico Open in February of 2020.

While his chipping undoubtedly needs improvement, it is not his fatal flaw. Poor course management is.

Thus far, course management has been the most consequential detractor to Hovland’s career.

There have been numerous instances where Hovland has had a chance to win or at the very least contend at a tournament that would qualify as a “signature win” on Tour for Hovland. Yes, his short game has been a hindrance, but his poor course management has been a non-negotiable disqualifier.

There are countless examples of this, but in particular, three of them stuck out to me.

Back in February of 2021, Hovland was in the midst of a spectacular second round at the WGC-Concession in Bradenton, Florida. He had seven birdies and no bogeys and found himself two shots back of the lead with one hole to play.

Then disaster struck.

After driving it into the fairway bunker, Viktor put his second over the green and into the palmetto bushes. Instead of taking an unplayable and trying to get up and down for bogey from a decent lie, he decided to try and punch it out of the bush.

After his failed punch out left him in a terrible spot in the greenside bunker, he put his next shot right back into the palmetto bush where he started. He continued to mangle the 18th hole until he finally made his quadruple bogey-8. He went from two back of the lead and possibly in the final pairing to six back of the lead with a slim to none chance of contending.

There’s that infectious smile again.

Back in March, Hovland once again found himself in contention on Sunday with a chance to win the most meaningful victory of his career at The Arnold Palmer Invitational. As he approached the par-3 17th, he was tied for the lead with Scottie Scheffler at -5. The conditions in the final round were very challenging, and the obvious play was to the middle of the green to try and make par. Instead, Hovland went for the pin and came up short, leaving himself a short-sided bunker shot. He went on to make bogey. Scheffler played it to the middle of the green and two-putt for an easy par and went on to win the tournament by one stroke.

Hovland’s course management issues continued to plague him in the first round of The Masters Tournament. After ten holes, he was -1 for his round and three shots off of the lead as he headed to back nine with some birdie holes in front of him. That’s when the lack of proper course management hurt Viktor once again.

The 11th hole at Augusta National is notoriously difficult, and even more so this year as it was lengthened by fifteen yards. With very few exceptions, the entire field played the approach shot into 11 short, not daring to go over the penalty area left with such a long iron shot coming in. At the time, there was only one birdie on the hole all day.

After a beautiful tee shot, Hovland had 221 yards into the green. Inexplicably, he decided once again to attack a pin that he had no business trying to take on. In the late part of the afternoon, there had only been one birdie made there all day, and it was a 35 foot putt. Predictably, his approach shot was left of the target and splashed in the penalty area. After grinding out a very good front nine, he made a double bogey-6 on the hole. As has happened so many times in the past, his poor decision making cost him precious strokes in an event where he can’t afford to give them away.

Hovland has had a good start to his career, but with generational talent comes lofty expectations. He has plenty of time to redirect his career trajectory and accomplish all of the feats his talent should all him to, but first he must address his fatal flaw.

The PGA Championship at Southern Hills would be a good place to start.

Your Reaction?
  • 18
  • LEGIT5
  • WOW3
  • LOL1
  • IDHT0
  • FLOP0
  • OB1
  • SHANK2

Continue Reading

WITB

Facebook

Trending