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Exotics CB5 Fairway Woods: Editor Review

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Pros: These might be the cleanest, classiest-looking fairway woods on the market. The titanium faces provide plenty of ball speed and forgiveness, and the stock shaft options are solid.

Cons: Four different lofts, but no adjustability. Did we mention that they’re $299?

Bottom Line: The CB5 fairway woods get top marks for ball speed, and they’re as forgiving and good looking as anything else you can buy. But they’re a little spinnier than other top fairway woods in their class. That makes them a good option for players who need more spin, or want more carry or workability than other high-COR fairway woods can provide.

Overview

With its Exotics fairway woods, Tour Edge has developed a reputation for making some of the best performing fairway woods in golf. Just ask Brandt Snedeker, who used a 13-degree version of the company’s CB4 fairway wood to win the PGA Tour’s 2012 FedExCup and earn of payday of more than $10 million.

The company’s new line of CB5 fairway woods are an improvement over the CB4, using a new SP-700 titanium face to give golfers slightly less spin and more ball speed across the face.

“SP-700 is about twice as light as steel,” said David Glod, president and founder of Tour Edge. “That allows us to put the center of gravity where we want.”

All things being equal, a lower center of gravity (CG) creates a higher launch, which is exactly what most players want from their fairway woods.

Tour Edge lowered the CG of the CB5 even more with its combo brazing process, which joins the club’s titanium cup face and heavier steel body without creating any welds. That, combined with its thicker sole plate, gives the CB5 a center of gravity that Glod said is lower than any of its competitors.

[youtube id=”2f4aZ1djpBM” width=”620″ height=”360″]

The Tour Edge Exotics CB5 fairway woods are available in lofts of 13, 15, 16.5 and 18 degrees, and come stock with “real deal” versions of Aldila’s RIP 70 Sigma or Mitsubishi Rayon’s Fubuki Tour shafts for $299.

CB5 Shaft Specs

CB5 Shaft Specs

Performance

The latest trend in fairway wood design is creating clubs with low, forward CG’s that increase ball speed and decrease spin. Those designs, like Callaway X Hot Pro and TaylorMade’s RBZ Stage 2 Tour, are great for golfers with a lot of swing speed who need to decrease spin to keep their shots out of the clouds. They’re also great for players who like to use their 3 wood off the tee as a second driver, because they create driver-like ball speeds from shorter, more lofted clubs.

But those clubs can also be too low spin for some players, which can:

  1. Limit carry distance and workability.
  2. Go too far for high-speed golfers who depend on their fairway woods for control, not distance.

That’s where the CB5 comes in. It’s a playable, workable fairway wood with a low center of gravity and a hot face.

IMG_2716

In our testing, we found the 15-degree CB5 to be almost 1 mph faster off the face than a 15-degree X Hot Pro and 14.5-degree RBZ Stage 2 Tour (adjusted to 15 degrees) with the same shaft, shaft length and swing weight, which we attributed to the titanium face construction. But because of the club’s increased spin, which was as much as 1000 rpms higher on certain swings, the CB5 tended to have a shorter total distance than the other clubs.

The added spin will help golfers hit the ball high and soft enough to hold a green, but it could produce a problem for some players. That’s why it’s a nice feature that 13-degree and 15-degree models of the CB5 are essentially the same club except for their loft. For players who need less spin, the 13-degree model will make more sense.

Looks and Feel

Like the CB4 fairway woods, the CB5’s have a medium face depth that many better players prefer. This gives the club a strong look off the tee, but might intimidate some golfers who use the club from the short grass and light rough. Those players will discover that despite its medium face depth, the CB5 is actually much better than many smaller fairway woods off the ground because of its extremely low center of gravity.

IMG_2730

Left to Right: Callaway’s X Hot Pro, TaylorMade’s RBZ Stage 2 Tour, Exotics CB5 (All 15 degrees).

The SP-700 titanium used to make the CB5’s cup face is a little harder than the CB4’s 15-3-3-3 titanium, which gives the club a stronger, more solid feel than many golfers might expect from a titanium-faced fairway wood. The sound is closer to a muted “ping” than a loud “crack,” and there’s a jumpy feel off the face that lets golfers know that the ball took off with some serious speed.

The CB5 fairway woods are smaller than the company’s more driver-like XCG6 fairway woods (our review of those is coming soon), a size that better players will appreciate. They also have a 1-degree open face angle in the 13- and 15-degree models, which will match the face angle of many better players’ drivers.

The Takeaway

The biggest drawback of the CB5 fairway woods are their $299 price tag, which doesn’t seem so bad when you consider that the clubs come with stock shafts that sell separately for hundreds of dollars. The CB5’s titanium faces and combo-brazed construction are two premium attributes that are uncommon in the industry as well, which also makes the sticker shock more manageable.

IMG_2709

The CB5 fairway woods use a thick, steel sole plate to move the CG even lower.

If you’re a golfer who is looking to hit your fairway woods as far as humanly possible, and will rush to the store in 2014 to buy the new model that promises five more yards, Exotics fairway woods probably aren’t for you. But if you’re looking for a premium-constructed, versatile fairway wood with a traditional look and pleasing sound, the CB5’s should be on your list of clubs to try.

Check the photos in the gallery below, which show more photos of the CB5 as well as comparison photos to the X Hot Pro and RBZ Stage 2.

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  1. matt

    Dec 27, 2015 at 11:35 pm

    Gee I wonder if the non believers in Exotics ever checked what snedeker used as a fairway wood when he won the fed ex cup … yup it was an Exotics .. and he wasn’t paid to play it …. Exotics is a sleeper brand because they don’t pay people to play their equipment nor spend millions on over hyped marketing adds. Check the golf digest awards you’ll see this name a lot

  2. Pingback: Tour Edge Exotics CG7 Fairway wood line given 5 Star Ranking - "Driver Like Ball Speed" | Hodson Golf

  3. Kenny P

    Oct 26, 2013 at 12:09 pm

    tee makes rubbish…buy an Adams club if you want quality, value and a long time partner in your bag.

  4. spencer096

    May 16, 2013 at 3:24 pm

    sigma’s are real deal?

  5. Chris

    May 10, 2013 at 3:17 pm

    How do they stay in business? Have a bit of a cult following, but generally a big under-performer at big $$$$!

    • Brian

      May 11, 2013 at 2:34 am

      Huh, big under performer??? Have you hit them or seen comparisons? The review states higher speeds then the TM. Expensive, yes. But you get a real shaft like in a TP. Compared to a TP or a custom order they are priced right.

      Just because they do not sponsor tour play, does not mean they cannot perform. Big under perform is a big opinionated viewpoint.

    • Mike

      May 26, 2013 at 12:56 pm

      Wow… that is an unfair statement to make, TEE are the best fairway woods out…end of, have owned and played one for a period of time? (not just demo at the range)great performing clubs, the CB1 & 2 have legendary status amongst elite players and although expensive, you get what you pay for and not “made for” shafts.

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2020 TaylorMade P770 irons: Distance and precision redefined

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New 2020 TaylorMade P770 irons are here, and with them, a reminder that every club in your bag has a purpose.

A driver is designed to go as far as possible, wedges are designed to be versatile precision instruments, and iron sets are built for both. The new 2020 TaylorMade P770 irons from TaylorMade bring together the distance of the extremely popular P790 with the precision of a midsized player cavity to offer distance and control to an iron unlike TaylorMade has ever produced.

2020 TaylorMade P770

2020 TaylorMade P770 6-iron. Cavity view.

More photos and discussion in the forums. 

TaylorMade P770 irons: The origin story

The story of the P770 starts with two clubs—the P760 and the P790. Now, if my math is correct, the combination of the two clubs would actually create the 775, but in the world of irons, that model number was taken over a decade ago by another OEM, and if we’re being honest, 770 sounds better anyways.

2020 TaylorMade P770, TaylorMade P790 comparison.

2020 TaylorMade P770, TaylorMade P790 comparison.

Let’s start with the P790 and its ability to infiltrate the golf bags of players of all skill levels. According to TaylorMade’s fitting database, the 790 is a club that can be found in the bags of players from +4 handicaps all the way up to golfers looking to break 100.

What makes the P790 so functional and appealing to so many golfers starts with its looks and ends with its performance. The P790 has the clean appearance of a blade iron from the back, and from address, it maintains sharper line associated with a  players club.

But off the clubface, or should I say all over the clubface, you get ball speed and launch conditions normally reserved for a much larger game improvement club. This iron helped redefine what is now known as the “players distance” category, and whether you consider that title an oxymoron or not, it’s impossible to argue with its popularity.

Then we have the P760, TaylorMade’s first combo iron set, which combined the power of SpeedFoam-filled longer irons with the precision of single-piece forged short irons. These irons again found their way into the golf bags of mid-handicaps to players all over the professional tours thanks to their ability to offer extra forgiveness and launch in longer clubs while still maintaining a small player’s look and preferred feel.

Regardless of skill, one of the biggest factors in the playability of any iron relies on a golfer’s ability to create speed, launch, spin, and angle of descent—the below video featuring our own Brian Knudson testing the P790 Ti is the perfect example of how an iron with strong lofts, for example, can launch higher and descend at an angle to make them playable when you combine the right technologies.

The ultimate design goal of the P770 was to combine the best of both these irons into a small, fast, playable package using every technology available to the engineers and designers at TaylorMade. This iron is about precision without sacrificing distance.

If you are a golfer looking for maximum workability and shotmaking control that puts less of a premium on distance, then the P7MB or P7MC is probably more up your ally, but if distance is still a big part of your decision-making process for a set of irons, then buckle up.

More photos and discussion in the forums. 

The technology

A look inside the construction of the P770

A simplistic way to describe the P770 would be to call it a shrunk-down version of the 790, but doing that would not give justice to the actual engineering that went into this design. The reason is, you can’t just shrink down a golf club and expect it to perform the same as a larger club, because not only are the mass properties different, but trying to maintain additional ball speed would be like expecting a smaller trampoline to bounce you as high as a larger one with bigger springs—the physics don’t add up.

“Designed to deliver P790-like performance in a smaller package, the all-new P770 leverages forged hollow body construction to pack as much distance and forgiveness as possible into a compact player’s shape.” – Matt Bovee, Product Creation

From address, and looking at the sole and toe profile, the P770 has a much stronger resemblance to the previous P760 than the 790, but from the back and from a technology standpoint, its got the guts of the P790.

The key technologies are

  • A SpeedFoam-supported forged 4140 high-speed steel face attached to a soft forged 8620 carbon steel body. Since the hosel is part of the forged body, you get the full lie and loft adjustability of a forged club along with the ball speed of a larger one. The secondary benefit of SpeedFoam is it creates an iron that feels extremely solid while being a multipiece construction
  • The other part of the speed story is the Thru Slot in the sole which helps shots hit lower on the face retain more ball speed and helps create extra launch. This technology runs from the 3-7 irons.
  • Speaking of launch, the new P770 has 46 grams of tungsten in the 3-7 irons positioned as low and as far back as possible towards the toe to boost MOI and launch in the longer clubs while precisely locating the center of gravity.
  • The final piece of the puzzle that helps with both distance and distance control is the Progressive Inverted Cone Technology or IVT. It is positioned closer to the toe in the longer irons to help with common mishits and moves higher and more heel ward into the shorter clubs. This keeps ball speeds variances as consistent as possible through the set.

More photos and discussion in the forums. 

Choose your own P700 Series adventure

This is the part where the whole iron series really excels. For a long time, it used to be OEMs would release a number of iron sets that catered to various golfers but didn’t really have any cross over potential as far as building combo sets because of the large differences between designs. To counter this, they would often design exclusive combo sets either catered to better players or to higher handicaps/slower speed players with game improvement irons paired with hybrid long irons.

From the beginning and by design, the entire P700 series has been built to be custom combo’ed for any golfer—an impressive design feat. This allows players of varying ability with different swing and player traits to get exactly what they need out of different parts of their set. They have even gone as far to make sure that no matter how someone is looking to build their set, they can get looks, offset, bounce, and performance to match up from club to club—they even have an easy-to-follow chart!

Pricing, availability, and specs

The TaylorMade P770 irons will be available for pre-order starting August 14th and will be be available in retail shops starting September 4th.

They will be available from 3iron to pitching wedge in right and left-handed with an A wedge option available to right-handed players only. An 8 piece set starts at $1399 (174.88 per club) with KBS Tour steel shafts and Golf Pride Z-Grip grey and black as stock.

P770 Stock Specs

More photos and discussion in the forums. 

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2020 TaylorMade P7MB and P7MC irons: Pressure to perfection

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One word defines the new 2020 Taylormade P7MB and P7MC forged irons: Pressure.

It’s a word we all know and feel. For the best golfers in the world, it’s what they chase day in and day out. In the case of TaylorMade, the pressure to deliver time in and time out increases with every launch of a new product. It’s also the application of pressure and what it represents that makes this story so interesting.

Introducing the new 2020 TaylorMade P7MB and P7MC forged irons. Using the popular P730 and P750 irons as the starting point, Senior Manager of Product Creation for Irons Matt Bovee and his team have left no stone unturned to deliver a one-two punch that will please both P730/750 die-hards (yes, they exist) and any players who were on the edge.

With the help of modern technology, periodic feedback from the tour staff, and the admiration of classic forgings from TaylorMade’s past, the 2020 TaylorMade P-7MB, and P-7MC  accomplished just what was required—they created irons with serious curb appeal that stood up to the most discerning pallets in the world: TM’s iconic tour staff.

More photos and discussion in the forums. 

TaylorMade P7MB irons

The new 2020 TaylorMade P7MB irons

The new 2020 TaylorMade P7MB irons

It needs to be said at the start that these new TaylorMade irons live in a different bucket than Tiger’s P7TW. Although those irons are used by a few players on tour, they were essentially built for one man and one swing—that’s it. So as not to confuse the issue, the TaylorMade P7MB is a stand-alone project designed to go in the bags of the likes of Rory (where they already are), DJ, Collin Morikawa, and a number of others on the major tours.

P7MB: The beginning

Just over 14 months ago, the development of the P7MB began. The nice thing was, TaylorMade had a good jumping-off point—the P730 “DJ Proto.” Although that iron has the stock P730 optics from afar, the DJ Proto has a longer blade length and a more contemporary look at address then the retail version.

“The P7MB, as far as inspiration for it, is simply just the evolution from the last two to three models starting with the 2014 Tour Preferred MB”

-Matt Bovee, Taylor Made Lead Designer Irons

Looking down at the new 2020 TaylorMade P7MB, you will see the influence of the DJ Proto. A longer blade length (1.4 mm longer than P730) complemented by a thin top line, slightly less offset (6-iron: 1.5 mm vs 1.8 mm in P730), and a similar sole profile checks off every box that players at the highest level want to see.

Unfortunately, getting that part down is only half the riddle. In this day and age, muscle back irons live in a very small box as far as what you can do. Optics are one thing, and most get that right, it’s the sound and feel and turf interaction that separates the men from the boys.

So what’s new?

So, what exactly will players experience with the P7MB iron?

Although it’s every marketing rep’s dream to say “more everything in every category,” in this particular instance, it’s in the nuance and very fine details that TM has made upgrades. To be honest “more everything” isn’t the win here. The victory is delivering an iron that performs apples to apples with the P730 all while offering a traditional look, a dash of forgiveness with the longer blade length (1.4 mm longer), and even better sound and feel.

2020 TaylorMade P7MB top line

This is where the “pressure” story comes in. TaylorMade R&D wanted to ensure that every process that could get maxed out to make this iron flawless would. The industry standard for forging weight pressure is around 1,000 tons, TaylorMade utilizes a 2,000-ton forging press to push the quality tolerance of every 1025 carbon steel forging to its peak. In simple terms, it’s like putting so much pressure on something you squeeze the air and any opportunity for a blemish clean out.

Secondly, the back muscle has gone through a cosmetic change. This was made for two main reasons

  1. to look amazing in the bag
  2. to dial in CG as close to perfect as they could

As with previous TaylorMade offerings, the use of milling across the face ensures consistency and sharp lines—and offers scoring lines that have been a staple in most TaylorMade players clubs.

The new 2020 TaylorMade P7MB face on

The muscle on the P7MB features a three-dimensional section out near the toe to not only highlight the distribution of weight but to add a little cachet to an already stunning golf club.

“We wanted to add a third dimension to that back section in order to do something special and at the same time stick the CG exactly where our staff wants to see it.”

-Matt Bovee TM

Truth be told, the new 2020 TaylorMade P7MB is a contemporary throwback. More so than any other TM blade in recent history (with the exception of RAC MB), this blade has a look and feel that can stand the test of time.

More photos and discussion in the forums. 

Initial reactions on tour

I was told that during the marketing shoot at the Floridian last October a few of the TM staff got a first glance at the MB. This is always the first real test for someone in Matt Bovee’s position, that first eyeball reaction is huge. Get the wrong look and it could throw off the whole project, get a good look and momentum goes from cruising to a full sprint.

Down the line, it was admiration from the first three to see it—DJ, Collin, and Wolff—to Rory’s smile at first glance and ultimate quick integration going into Memorial.

“At the photoshoot last fall we showed the early prototype to Wolff and Morikawa and they were all over it immediately, their eyes lit up seeing only the head and at that point, I knew we were on to something special.”

-Matt Bovee TM

Speaking to the forgiveness part for a second. Rory has been a combo set player for a long time. The top of his iron set is typically a P760/750 3 and 4-iron and 5-PW the 730’s. After spending some time at home with the P7MB he felt the new MB’s were plenty forgiving top to bottom and showed up to Memorial with a full set of 3-PW.

Here is a quick peek at Rory’s first reaction from earlier this year…

Rory McIlroy’s bag, featuring 3-PW in TaylorMade P7MB.

The experience

I am by no means a player who is drawn to a forged muscle back. Maybe in the rare case, I’ll have it in 9/PW. The point is, they don’t provide enough help for a player like me. However, these are easy to hit, believe it or not. The longer blade length gives the appearance of a club that wants to square up, and I also appreciated the lines on the P7MB.

For the TaylorMade blade aficionados, the P7MB (to my eye) lives somewhere between the RAC MB and the 2014 Tour Preferred. The top-line is slightly straight, but not as much as the P7TW, and the toe shape could be called softly squared off. It’s an elegant design and doesn’t scare you sitting it down.

The acoustics are where you will experience that 2,000 tons of pressure—especially on a center-thin strike. The P730, when caught thin, sounded really thin, the P7MB does dull that out a bit and makes those shots a bit less painful than they could be.

I was able to go club-for-club with the P7TW, P730, and P7MB, and without getting into a data rabbit hole, I carried the P7MB about four yards further on average. Not a ton, but certainly enough to acknowledge.

P7MB: Overall

Winner, winner. Let’s be really honest here, what were the odds of this club not checking off every box? The muscle back war is won in the whole experience—from how it looks in the bag, to that first center strike, all the way to how it makes you feel as a player.

Is this club for 10 handicappers? No. 8’s? No. It was designed for the Rorys, DJs, and Collin Morikawas of the world. TaylorMade wanted to make a superb “staff blade” and Bovee and his crew did it. No small feat. The P730 was involved in a ton of great golf over the past three years—hard to improve on that. But they did—just in a very nuanced way. Well done.

Specs

Available for preorder on August 14, 2020, and in stores beginning September 4, 2020, P7MB irons ($1,399) will be offered in (3-PW) and come equipped with KBS Tour steel shafts (X 130g, S 120g) as well as the Golf Pride Z-Grip in grey/black. Available in RH and yes LH)

More photos and discussion in the forums. 

TaylorMade P7MC irons

Its predecessor, the P750, is arguably the best players cavity back TaylorMade has ever designed. With multiple wins across the world and a strong presence among top amateurs and college players, the P750 won players over for one main reason: simplicity.

So, when Matt Bovee and the team decided to go back in and build something new, there weren’t a lot of places to go beyond one or two ticks better. In this iron class, that’s all that is required.

Introducing the new 2020 TaylorMade P7MC players cavity back iron.

2020 TaylorMade P7MC

“We had a great foundation to work off of with the P750 so the main things we wanted to focus on was keeping the DNA of a great iron and simply making it sound and feel a little better and be a bit more appealing sitting in the bag.”

-Matt Bovee TM

Visuals

At address, the 2020 TaylorMade P7MC will look very similar to the P750—why mess with a good thing? The part of this iron that players will appreciate is the nod to TaylorMade heritage—i.e. the 2005 TP Forged and the Japan-only version.

More photos and discussion in the forums. 

So, what’s new?

Like its muscle back sibling, the 2020 TaylorMade P7MC incorporates the same 2,000-ton pressure forging to ensure the feel and sound are dialed in. This iron is also truly a one-piece forging, no titanium plugs, no extra badging no real bells, and whistles. The player will notice a slightly longer blade length (the P750), thin top line and a touch more offset then the P7MB.

It’s a simple clean players cavity back that looks amazing in the bag, behind the ball, and most likely on TV. Trust me, even that matters.

In addition, the milling process gives P7MC the sharp lines and grooves we can expect from TaylorMade forgings.

The New TaylorMade P7MC Face On

The experience

Like the P7MB, I had the chance to test the MC, and what I liked most about it was the lack of surprises. Yes, it’s stunning to look at, probably more so than any club TaylorMade had made in recent memory, including the P7TW. It’s gorgeous, but past that, the iron is just a workhorse. It has a crisp feel, plays very similar to the MB with the exception of mishits for obvious reasons. Simple, simple, simple. For the best players in the world, that’s all they want. Does it look good? Yes. Feel good? Yes. Most importantly will it take a long time to transition from my P750’s? No.

In this category, I like that. In the MB, MC category, a 1-2 percent improvement is all you really want to see.

Overall

It will come as a shock to no one, the 2020 TaylorMade P7MC is everything die-hard P750 players would want. The DNA of a great iron is there, they feel a bit better with the new pressure process, they look ridiculously cool, offer a pinch more forgiveness, and most importantly, they do the job.

Specs

 

Available for preorder on August 14 and at retail beginning September 4

P7MC irons ($1,399) will be offered in (3-PW) and come equipped with KBS Tour steel shafts (X 130g, S 120g) as well as the Golf Pride Z-Grip in grey/black. Available in RH and LH.

More photos and discussion in the forums. 

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TaylorMade MG2 TW Grind wedges are officially coming to retail

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New for 2020: TaylorMade MG2 TW Grind wedges.

Tiger Woods not only moves the needle in golf…he is the needle. No one in golf history (perhaps sports, for that matter) garners the interest that the 15-time major champion does. So, when a piece of his equipment becomes available to the masses, it’s a big deal.

Introducing the long-awaited TaylorMade MG2 TW (Tiger Woods) Grind wedges.

2020 TaylorMade MG2 Tiger Woods Grind

First off, there is something that all of us need to understand about anything in Tiger Woods’ bag…it’s made for him. P7TW irons are the perfect example. Although they are beautiful in the bag and hold the necessary “wow” factor, they were designed for Tiger, by Tiger…that’s it.

This absolutely is not to dissuade someone from giving these a whirl, the point is, they are unique to him and have details about them that you must understand before sticking it in play.

The TaylorMade MG2 (Milled Grind 2) TW Grind wedge sits in the same box.

In simple terms, they are wedges that simply do it all—but only if you are skilled enough to use them.

More photos and the discussion in the forums.

TaylorMade MG2 TW Grind wedge: 56-12

TaylorMade MG2 Tiger Woods WITB 56

TaylorMade MG2 Tiger Woods WITB 56

TaylorMade MG2 Tiger Woods WITB 56

The grind on the TaylorMade MG2 TW is a dual-sole profile that allows Tiger to play multiple shots in any situation. Probably fair to say that it’s a 56 degree that could masquerade as a 60 in some cases. With quite a bit of heel relief for a 56-degree wedge, the TaylorMade MG2 TW Grind is designed to be both an optimum wedge for full shots and offer a ton of versatility around the greens.

Keep in mind TW is a player that still uses the 56-degree around the greens a good portion more than most on tour. Hence the heel relief and unique sole design. In addition, he doesn’t carry a gap wedge, so the 56 has to deliver the perfect turf interaction for high-speed shots.

Chris Trott from TaylorMade sports marketing had a chance to chat with Tiger about his wedges last year and this is what he said:

“I had the good fortune of talking to Tiger a little about the nature of his wedges and the biggest take away was that he likes to commit to exactly what part of the of the bounce he wants to utilize. Once that’s committed to, it’s time to execute.”

More photos and the discussion in the forums.

TaylorMade MG2 TW Grind: 60-11

2020 TaylorMade MG2 Tiger Woods Grind Retail vs Tigers

The same things apply to the TaylorMade MG2 TW 60-11.

The unique pre-worn leading edge offers a bounce profile that works for shots squared up, while the aggressive heel relief on the back edge allows the wedge to sit close to the ground on open-face shots. To be honest, this 60-degree wedge has a high/med/low bounce profile, not really adding grind profiles to one wedge, more like adding a shot buffet for the player who knows what s/he is doing.

2020 TaylorMade MG2 TW Grind Down the Line

2020 TaylorMade MG2 TW Grind Face on

I had a chance to speak with TaylorMade’s Principal Engineer Paul Demkowski who was the project lead on P7TW and MG2 TW, and this is what he had to say:

Paul Demkowski and Tiger Woods at TaylorMade’s “Kingdom”

JW: Walk me through the process of developing the TW wedge from A to Z—including your time and collaboration with Mike Taylor.

PD: The collaboration with Mike T was a download of information from the 15-plus years he’s worked with TW…understanding the evolution of his sole designs and where it currently stood. We wanted to add tech to make it TaylorMade. That’s where Milled Grind technology came in. This allowed us to perfectly duplicate his complex sole grinds every single time.

For the first six months, the grinds were very similar to what he used. In January of 2019, I met with TW at Torrey Pines. He asked for a new 60-degree wedge with more bounce and less heel relief. He felt this would be better for his bunker play. We made the adjustments to the design and got the new sole grind to TW within a few weeks. He won the Masters with it and has been using this new sole grind in the 60 ever since. This is the grind being sold in the MG2 TW.

JW: The MG2 TW Grind has a very unique profile—it’s almost five grinds in one. Can you explain what makes it so unique?

PD: The number of complex surfaces on the sole is what make these wedges so unique. The pre-worn leading edge adds resistance to digging while still allowing the leading edge to sit low. The trailing edge and heel relief make these wedges very versatile for different shots around the green. With different face angles, the leading edge still stays low, which is unique while having a decent amount of bounce and camber. The combination of these features produces a wedge that is good in tight/firm conditions but also good in bunkers and softer conditions.

JW: Eliminating the obvious, what other profile of player would this wedge be good for?

PD: They are for a skilled wedge player that has a shallow-to-neutral attack angle…that likes a lot of versatility with the leading edge sitting low to the ground.

JW: Since the angles are so specific, would bending it weak or strong change the essence of the whole wedge?

PD: Just like any other wedge you will increase or decrease bounce when you weaken or strengthen loft. Plus or minus one degree of loft change would be hard to notice. Strengthening more than a degree will require the player to be extra precise with the reduction in bounce.

Specs: (TW’s specs on the button, FYI)More photos and the discussion in the forums.

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