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TRUE linkswear adds to its collection with Proto

by   |   February 1, 2013
true linkswear
TRUE linkswear adds to its collection with Proto GolfWRX

Summary: Looking for the most comfortable shoe you could wear? You found them here. Golf Shoes 2.0

4.5

Nice change


Rob Rigg, president of TRUE Linkswear, and the rest of the TRUE team dusted off their high school biology education to help build a better golf shoe.

“Our thought process in making the shoes was if humans are supposed to have heels, they would have evolved with one,” Rigg said. “We don’t have heels for a reason.”

Naturally, the company created a barefoot shoe with what they call “zero drop,” keeping the heel and forefoot at the same level. TRUE released its first shoe, the TRUE tour, in 2011 and has grown since, most recently releasing the TRUE proto.

By not having a heel in the shoe, Rigg explained how it helps give golfers better posture and better form on their swings.

The proto has received a good deal of attention since Ryan Moore, a part owner of TRUE, won the 2012 JT Shriner’s Open in Las Vegas in a pair. The shoe design was based largely on input from Moore, and was released to the public earlier this year.

“Ryan wanted something he could really hit into, so the shoe’s still very barefoot but we decided to add a little more outer ridge to the side so when he’s transferring to the left side, he can really power through,” Rigg said.

The proto sells for $169.99 and has what TRUE calls a “sensei” outsole to provide more stability and traction.

Other TRUE shoes, such as the tour, have TRUE’s “ninja” outsole, which gives more flexibility and feel for the golfer.

The proto meets TRUE’s five requirements for being a barefoot shoe. It has the zero drop, a thin outsole, flexibility, a wide toebox and is light weight.

On the bottom of the proto, there is a three-millimeter thick rubber outsole and five-millimeter thick traction elements spread throughout as if they were spikes. This allows for an easier walk on pavement while also allowing grass to pass through the traction elements and allowing the golfer to feel the sand or green on the course.

“It’s pretty intense if you haven’t tried our shoes before,” Rigg said.

Another benefit to TRUE shoes is that buyers do not have to worry about getting the right shoe width. TRUE shoes keep the foot stable with memory foam in the back, a sock-fit liner in the middle and the wide toebox at the top. The toe box allows for the toes to spread out which also promotes stability.

The release of the proto gives TRUE six different men’s shoes on the market, ranging in price from $99.99 for the phx and sensei to $209.99 for the chukka. There are also two TRUE women’s shoes — the isis and jade, each for $99.99 — and in March, it will release its first shoe for children called the padawan ($59.99).

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12 Comments

  1. Johnny

    November 24, 2013 at 1:00 am

    These shoes are terrible. Not only do they look bad, they also have terrible traction. I would be better off wearing running shoes. My back foot slips just about every time I hit my driver. I do not recommend these. They are seriously ugly and cheap

  2. Lykato

    April 21, 2013 at 7:56 am

    I was disappointed with these shoes. They don’t grip very well in wet conditions in the morning. Sometimes you may feel yourself slip even when it’s not wet.

  3. https://Twitter.com/

    March 28, 2013 at 5:35 am

    It’s actually a great and helpful piece of information. I am satisfied that you shared this useful info with us. Please keep us informed like this. Thank you for sharing.

  4. Patrick

    February 15, 2013 at 1:02 am

    I purchased a pair of True Tour shoes 6 months ago. They are so comfortable, they are like wearing slippers.Because I have a broad foot , size 9US, I bought the 10US and they fitted like a glove. No !! I won’t be updating… I LOVE THESE ones. Thanks to True Linkswear.

  5. Scott

    February 14, 2013 at 8:20 pm

    Why do they have to sell them for such a high price if they are minimalist shoes? :-)

  6. TWShoot67

    February 3, 2013 at 2:23 pm

    Great job Zach although I would have liked to do the interview with my boy Rob. This guy has changed the game when it comes to shoes in the golf industry. Now every single company out there is trying to catch up and ay they have the best lightweight shoe or best ground connection. You have to give this guy credit as he’s changed the footwear industry. I haven’t tried the NEW Sensei Proto but will soon for sure. I’ve been wearing these shoes as i was probably one of the first to tout this company. Now it looks like the rest of the golfing world has finally found them out. You can’t find a better more comfortable golf shoe. PERIOD!

    • john k

      February 6, 2013 at 7:16 pm

      First off let me start out by saying I have a son and daughter and wife who play. I put all 4 of us in spikeless shoes years back when Etonic came out with the G-SOK series. Well made shoe for the money and while many would comment that they looked comfortable, it was hard for many golf purists to comprehend that they would hold up on sidehill lie’s or wet conditions. Honestly they did. Whne True came along I jumped on the bandwagon immediately as I saw a company taking the no spike shoe to another level. I own 2 of the original soled shoes that have a nubby like bottom. Comfort and traction were fine, but the appearance I wouldn’t say was in line with what most players would commit to(almost a clown look to the shoe). I then upgraded to the Phx line last year and from my experience the shoe held up just as well as the original version but had a better look to attract the masses. I recently bought the True Sensei when it was released and have consistently used them while walking outdoors, playing golf and also working out(normal gym exercises). Quite honestly I find the Sensei platform to be far superior to the other lines and previous lines that are and were offered. I just ordered the Proto in brown and white. Tried the white out yesterday on the range…great look…much improved in my opinion and the best all around shoe True has made to date! I have viewed the new FJ(didn’t get a chance to try on)(ECCO)nothing to write home about and a few others that I can’t recal the maufacturers name…All in, this shoe delivers…and possibly most importatly, it allows you to walk in comfort and feel the ground as intended. Signed, a True fan for life!!

  7. Steffan Perry

    February 2, 2013 at 10:06 pm

    Actually humans are suppose to have “heels”. The correct way to run for example is technically to never let your “heels” touch the ground. Footwear have negated to need to keep our heals off the ground, however the longest distance runners in the world in rual South America run without the heals ever touching the ground, arching them up like “heels” in a shoe.

    • toph davis

      May 13, 2013 at 2:29 pm

      they also run barefoot

  8. Troy Vayanos

    February 2, 2013 at 3:24 pm

    I’ve got issues with too much pronating in my feet. Will the TRUE Linkswear give me enough support to combat the problem?

    Thanks for the review

  9. Kyle

    February 2, 2013 at 11:01 am

    My Grandma would love the look of these shoes.

  10. Pete

    February 1, 2013 at 5:00 pm

    I’m a big fan of my True Linkswear Tours from 2011 and will be looking into the protos as a replacement.

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