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Editor Review: Miura’s New Wedge Series

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I’ve been playing the Miura 1957 Series Y and K wedges for the last year and a half. Although I’ve loved the playability and feel of them, I’d pretty much worn out the grooves, so it was time for a change.

I’d was contemplating ordering an identical set, when I saw that Miura was releasing a new series of wedges (called the “New Wedge Series”). Being the typical GolfWRX member that I am, I had to try them. I immediately called my local Miura dealer, Aloha Golf Center, and ordered a 51-degree and 57-degree heads.

Five days later, I got the call that the heads had arrived and were ready to be built with whatever shafts I desired. I chose the same shafts I’ve been playing in my Miura Y & K grind wedges, the True Temper Tour Concept wedge shafts. The guys at Aloha Golf Center said they’d have the shafts installed and ready for me, and to decide on the length and grip I’d want by the time I got off work. You can bet the last four hours of my day seemed like forever!

Miura uses authorized clubmakers to fit and build its equipment in the United States. What this means is you get exactly what you want and what will work for you. This alone I feel sets them apart from the majority of retail wedges on the market. I for one prefer certain wedge shafts, which at the moment is the True Temper Tour Concept. I also play my wedges at the same length and 0.5 inches longer than standard. Being able to order a custom wedge saves me a lot time compared to retail wedges, which I have to tear it apart before I use. With that said, here’s the review of Miura’s New Wedge Series.

Pros: It’s got Miura stamped on it, a name that’s synonymous with tradition and craftsmanship. It’s a stamp of promise that everything you ever wanted in feel was going to be there on the first well struck shot.

Cons: Most of the retail wedge market is filled with other manufacturers that are offering custom finishes and/or laser etching. Most also have special milled and/or micro-milled grooves, with numerous other touches to increase spin. Miura offers pretty standard fare — pressed conforming grooves.

Bottom Line: Everything I’ve come to learn about Miura and its tradition behind its name is present in these wedges. The shape is perfect for my eye and the feel is buttery soft — exactly what I expected from Miura. These are not cookie-cutter wedges that will be gone when the next set of wedges made. You can play them until the grooves wear out and you’ll want a second identical set!

Miura New Wedge Series

The Review: Miura New Wedge Series

  • Material: Forged Low Carbon Mild Steel
  • Lofts: 51 and 57 degrees (bent to 52 and 58)
  • Standard 61 degree lie angles bent 2.5 degrees flat
  • Length: 36 inches
  • Shaft: True Temper Tour Concept Wedge Flex
  • Grip: Lamkin 3Gen REL (Grey)

Performance

I’ve found the performance and playability of these wedges to be outstanding. Seriously though, the leading edge grind, bounce angle and sole width work superbly together.

The New Wedge Series 51 is a super gap filler for me. The feel at impact from a tight mowed fairway is fantastic. The sole grind interacts with the turf and the ball incredibly well. The crisp sound at impact leaves you with a clean feeling and a strike that works so well that the amount of spin generated is remarkable considering there is no added micro-grooves or specially milled face. I’ve always said that in my opinion a wedge will work only as well as its grind. This is one of those wedges, and its grind will assist in getting great contact and producing the spin you’re looking for.

The New Wedge Series 57 is a bunker killer. The sole width and grind work wonderfully in the fluffy sand traps. The face opens up well and looks good open, leaving you confident in pulling off those types of shots. There are some wedges that look awkward near the hosel when you open it up, but the New Wedge Series 57 is not one of those. The sole works as it should, gliding you across and under the ball and producing a nice “thud” sound as you complete your shot. From a tight-mowed fairway lie, I thought the 57 would be a little more difficult to use because of its wider sole, but I was wrong. The leading edge grind kept me just the right amount above the turf to still attack the ball, yet kept me from digging a trench. I also found it great from the rough, as the thicker sole helped keep the head from digging and interacted enough with the grass that I didn’t just scoot under the ball.

Distance control was easily gained after a few range sessions and rounds, leaving me with practically no learning curve and a seamless transition from my Y and K Miura wedges.

Miura relief

Looks and Feel

Initial overall looks are what I call “normal” for Miura, and what many of the other brands wish they could be. For those not familiar, Miura is a company with a huge history of tradition in its clubs. It has excelled in making not only clubs that play well, but look superb. The gentle curves of the sole, simple Miura stampings and a satin finish that is so pleasing to even the unknowing eye. It screams out to you that this club is different from everything else on the racks. This is class, history and tradition carefully forged into a piece of golf art. This is a wedge that you’ll have a tough time the first outing slamming it into the dirt or digging a ball out of a bunker. You’ll wish all lies were on a nice piece of freshly mowed turf!

Miura sole grind

The new wedge series is stamped with a Japanese Kanji character, which translates to “noble” and “striving” in English — two words that fit so well with the wedge in so many areas. Miura has always aimed to produce the best for golfers. It doesn’t resort to silly gimmicks — only tried-and-true perfection that it has worked at for decades. When you initially look at the new wedges, you see the regal nobility of the design and you know Miura hasn’t stopped striving to achieve perfection.

I’ve mentioned before in my reviews of Miura clubs that the satin finish exudes a richness that makes me wonder why everyone else can’t get a satin chrome finish to look so gorgeous. It’s so clean, pristine and so precious looking, producing a beautiful silvery glow in your bag.

Feel has been Miura’s calling card forever. There is nothing in my opinion that feels as great as a Miura, and the New Wedge Series is a great entry for anyone to get a taste of Miura forgings.

Miura Shape

The New Wedge Series is forged from mild carbon steel, and it is clean, crisp and offers tons of feedback to your hands on short and full shots. It doesn’t matter if you open up the wedge or keep it square — the feel is consistent through the face. There are no dead or hot spots on the face of these wedges. There’s just a clean, pure feeling not found in many other wedges.

As I stated earlier, distance control was gained quickly, and the feel of these wedges greatly enhance that ability. The audible click at impact isn’t too loud or too soft, and works well in instilling feel to your shots. I absolutely love using the 52 around the edges of the green and the 57 is superb for me at 55 yards.

The Takeaway

The New Wedges Series from Miura is yet another great series from the Miura Foundry in Himeji, Japan. The look, feel and performance is everything you would expect from the years of craftsmanship and tradition behind the name. Just the looks of the New Wedge Series was enough to make me want to try them out.

After I got over the looks and had them built to my specs, the feel I expected and wanted was there to leave a smile on my face. I’ve now been using these wedges for more than four months and they’ve continued to impress me and leave many smiles!

The New Wedge Series is available in lofts of 51, 53, 55, 57 and 59 (right handers only) from Miura dealers. MSRP is $235 with a standard True Temper Dynamic Gold Shaft.

If you get a chance, are curious or just want to “dip a toe” into the Miura line up, I highly suggest you try the New Wedge Series. You’ll be hard pressed to find something so pretty, and work as great as it looks!

Click here for more discussion in the “JDM (Japanese Domestic Market)” forum.

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Reid's been an avid golfer for more than 40 years. During that time, he's amassed quite a putter collection and has become one of GolfWRX's leading equipment nuts. Reid tries all the latest equipment in hopes of finding the latest and greatest of them all to add to his bag. He was born and raised in Honolulu, Hawaii where the courses are green and the golf is great!

10 Comments

10 Comments

  1. Pingback: Miura Golf Sale | KW Pro Golf

  2. Bryan

    Jan 5, 2014 at 10:55 pm

    I have a set of these on order and will be installed KBS C Taper Lite shafts when they come in. 53 and 57 (bent to 58). Best feeling wedges I’ve ever hit, I definitely think I made the right decision switching to these from Vokeys.

  3. Patrick McClelland

    Aug 2, 2013 at 10:11 am

    I don’t have these wedges. But, I have played the CB 501s for over a year on fairways that are always baked hard and fast in the United Arab Emirates. Like many, I see little difference between the Miura offering and the MP 68s that I came from in terms of feel and playability. Having said that, I have noticed a tremendous difference in terms of durability. My Mizunos had to be adjusted for loft and lie once per month and typically last no more than 1 full season of 1-2 rounds per week. Although, slightly softer in terms of ball-striking the Miuras require adjustments only once every 3 or 4 months and look yo be as good as new after 1 full season. I expect to have them for 2 more years; well worth the additional purchase price.

  4. Gae922

    Jul 9, 2013 at 3:14 pm

    Yep, complety agree with this review… I have just switch from Titleist Vokey SM4 to Miura Wedge Series… this is an other world… Feeling, sensation, no compromise… o))

  5. Tyler

    May 17, 2013 at 4:31 pm

    I have the 51 bent to 53 to add some bounce and i absolutely love this club. from the playability standpoint its unmatched. can hit the driven 95 yard spinner up to 120 yard floater… I have a custom miura pure grip on it and it is amazing. especially for some1 who lives in Seattle in a wetter climate… If you need any information on ordering go to vonsgolf.com… He is the best clubmaker in washington and played on the PGA tour for a couple years. Make sure to get fit on tackman for your wedge shaft. So important… I also have the K grind 56 bend to 58 and its the best sand wedge ive ever hit…

  6. Mat

    Feb 12, 2013 at 12:35 am

    I got a 53* with a C-taper as well, and I can say that hands-down, it is the best club I have ever played. Something about the C-taper shaft matches so well with it. If you want to dip your toe into JDM, this is the best way.

  7. Teddy Boy

    Feb 6, 2013 at 1:30 pm

    I bought these wedges because they are expensive and make me feel superior to everyone around. People come up and say those look expensive, I always smile and say yes they are and they match my platinum rolex daytona. I love being a snob. Life is good!

  8. Jason

    Jan 11, 2013 at 11:04 pm

    Several companies offer forged wedges and I’ve spent a good deal of time hitting forged wedges, I can’t stand a cast wedge for some reason, I can actually play with cast irons just fine but not the wedges and I would have to agree with James. Can’t tell a huge difference between Miura and Mizuno. Touch different look but similar feel, and for the price point, it’s just not worth it.

  9. James

    Jan 11, 2013 at 6:42 am

    I have a Miura 53 and 59 degree wedges. with KBS C Typre shafts. I have played Mizuno equipment most of my 32 yrs golfing life. still a 3 handicap. Can honestly say that my expriance is that not Miura, Cleveland, Titleist wedges are any better than Mizuno. I find the Miura wedges and short irons to big and in the normal sets, find the damatic ship change from 7 iron to 8,9 and PW not to my liking. So my advice, pick the wedge you like in shape and feel and play them. the same with irons. I played Miura CB 202 irons for 3 seasons and back to Mizuno, my scores did not change.

    • freddy

      Jan 11, 2013 at 2:10 pm

      I’m playing CB 202 irons now… after playing Mizuno for 5+ years. This will be my first full season with them, and from the limited range/rounds, I can feel the difference in the “softness”, which I like– I don’t work the ball too much, so it does not make sense to compare on this factor. I also like the look of the CB 202’s a little more, especially at address… I’m not knocking Mizuno that far back, in fact, the back up bag still has Mizuno all over it. I guess time will tel…

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Whats in the Bag

Justin Thomas’ winning WITB: 2019 BMW Championship

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Driver: Titleist TS3 (9.5 degrees)
Shaft: Mitsubishi Diamana BF 60TX

justin-thomas-witb-driver

3-wood: Titleist TS3 (15 degrees)
Shaft: Mitsubishi Tensei CK Pro Blue 80TX

5-wood: Titleist 915Fd (18 degrees)
Shaft: Fujikura Motore Speeder VC 9.2 Tour Spec X

Irons: Titleist T100 (4-iron), Titleist 718 MB (5-9)
Shafts: True Temper Dynamic Gold Tour Issue X100

Wedges: Vokey Design SM7 (46, 52, 56 degrees), Vokey Design SM6 (60 degrees)
Shaft: True Temper Dynamic Gold Tour Issue S400

Photo via Vokey Wedge Rep Aaron Dill

Putter: Scotty Cameron X5

Grip: SuperStroke Pistol GT Tour

Ball: Titleist Pro V1x

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How @justinthomas34 marks his @titleist Pro V1x ????

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Grips: Golf Pride Tour Velvet Cord

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Forum Thread of the Day: “Best ball for players with slower swing speeds?”

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Today’s Forum Thread of the Day comes from ghoul31 who created a thread dedicated to finding the ideal golf ball for players with slower swing speeds. Our members have their say on what is the ball most suited to slower swing speeds, with a variety of models receiving a mention.

Here are a few posts from the thread but make sure to check out the entire discussion and have your say at the link below.

  • Hogan9: “My SS is 80 to 85. I play the Titleist AVX. Many people on these forums tell it’s wrong for me. I’ve tried several brands and types over the last year ( Pro-V-1 and 1X, Cally Supersoft and Chrome Soft, TM TP5X, Wilson Duo Soft and the Snell MTB. The AVX gives me the best overall performance for my game. I’ve had to slightly adjust to how it reacts on chips and pitches, but the extra distance off the tee is well worth it. “
  • North Butte: “Maybe 90mph driver swing on a good day. Driver 205-ish hit 6-iron from 150. Pro V1x but I have played AVX, B330, TP5 with pretty much similar results to my favorite V1x. Also played the Chrome Soft for a while but it seemed to fly a little low and sometimes have trouble holding greens (or maybe I just didn’t give it a long enough chance to know for sure).”
  • Hat Trick: “Pro V1X – Spin and higher launch keeps it in the air longer, but at the same time that spin holds the greens – SS 96-98 mph.”
  • Kmac: “My SS is right around 95-100, and I find the QST to the perfect for my game. I will also play the AVX or Chrome Soft Truvis. But for the money, nothing beats the QST.”

Entire Thread: “Best ball for players with slower swing speeds?”

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Forum Thread of the Day: “Single length irons stunting development?”

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Today’s Forum Thread of the Day comes from rbark11 who has sparked an interesting debate over single length irons in our forums. Rbark11 has been playing single length irons for the past seven months, and he is concerned that he may have issues changing back to regular length irons. Our members give their take on the matter, as well as discussing single length irons in general.

Here are a few posts from the thread, but make sure to check out the entire discussion and have your say at the link below.

  • mcs4: “No, it will not. Both my father and I are currently playing Cobra One Length irons after decades of playing variable length irons. It took both of us maybe a few rounds to feel comfortable with the switch. This weekend I played a round with my old irons, and it was different but not a big deal. My opinion is that there are pros and cons with each approach, but I don’t think picking one will make any particular negative impact on your ability to later switch to the other.”
  • Quadra: “I’ve played both. Right now I am back to VL clubs ( Wishon 560 irons). Find VL gives me more shot-making options. With uneven lies, especially with the ball above or below foot level, the shot seems easier with a more upright or flatter lie, rather than trying to manipulate a shot from clubs with only a single length/lie. VL = more shot possibilities.”
  • Aucaveman: “I played Cobra ftbo for a year. Shot my best scores ever. Our club switched to Mizuno exclusively, so I had my first real fitting. I switched to the 919 forged and had to sell the Cobras to fund the mizunos. Really wished I hadn’t. I really liked the Cobras. The shafts in the Mizuno’s are better suited for me but had I put the same shafts in the Cobras; I’d prob been better off. At some point, I’ll prob do it and go back to one lengths. I was perusing eBay yesterday actually.”
  • Brandons68: “I think that the consistency you gain from SL irons is pretty great. I have not played them personally, but have talked to several people that have, and they really like the feel of the irons and the fact that they swing every iron the same because they are all the same length.”

Entire Thread: “Single length irons stunting development?”

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