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Poor weight transfer (and how we develop swing flaws)

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I recall an old joke about a guy who was lost on a country backroad. He spots a local resident and asks for directions to a certain town. The local responds: “You can’t get there from here.”

Whenever I hear that joke, I think about weight transfer in the golf swing. Yeah, a remote connection, I’m sure, but it works for purposes of today’s story. The analogy is this: A student recently swung to the top of the backswing and asked me how to “transfer his weight to the left foot” (he was right handed). I replied, “you can’t get there from here.”

The reason most players do not properly transfer their weight or “turn through,” is simply because they are not in a position to do so. They literally must move away from the target and head for the trail side.

Here are a few examples of why.

Over the top

As the downswing begins, if the arms and club go out, not down, effectively the player is not swinging at the golf ball. If she keeps going from there, she will not hit the ball, or barely top it at best. This player is swinging at something in front of the ball, or outside of it. Shoulders spin open early, arms/hands go out but stay UP, and now the club head will very likely get to the golf ball LATE. But, and here’s the catch, anyone who plays often attempts to correct this swing bottom problem by reversing course!  The body senses the poor sequence and tries the right the ship by quickly backing up. Or casting. So, we get an out-to-in swing direction but a shallow attack angle! What I refer to a “left field from the right foot.’

When you see the flaw from this perspective, it becomes perfectly obvious why. Because, if the player kept going without a mid stream correction, they might top every shot, mo in an effort to get the ball airborne, the player lowers the rear side, raises the front side and swings UP from the outside. So you do bottom out nearer the ball, but you’ve introduced a HOST of other issues. I’m not saying this is a conscious effort in the less than two seconds it takes to swing the club, I’m saying that it develops unconsciously over time. And the more one plays, the more they “perfect” this sequence. In my experience, this is how most, if not all, swing faults begin. Correcting a fault with another fault. It is truly ingenious, really!

Steep Transition

If the swing gets to the top and does begin down inside, unlike above where it begins down outside the line, or over the plane, but the club starts down on a very steep incline, it is headed for a crash;  keep going from there, and you’re likely to stick it straight into the ground or, at the least, hit it straight off the toe. Again, over time, the player senses this, and develops a motion of “backing up; reversing the upper body to flatten the golf club and get it onto a reasonable incline to strike the ball. I see this day in and day out. The inevitable question is: “Why can’t I get through the shot”? Because…you had to reverse the upper body to avoid an even greater disaster..

These are just two examples involving improper weight transfer. But if we see other swing flaws in this light, I think it explains a lot. For example, “raising the handle,” or “standing the club up,” lower body extension (“humping”), holding on through impact, casting, sending hand path far away from the body (disconnection), all these can can almost always be attributed to something that preceded those flaws. That is, they are rarely the root cause, they are the REACTION to another position or motion. They are “save” attempts.

Here’s another way of describing it: Many, in fact most, steep swings result in a shallow attack angle.  Many open club faces at the top of the swing actually hook the ball, many closed faces at the top of the swing hit slices or at least high blocks, and so on. How do I know this? I have stood right next to golfers for almost 40 years and observed it up close and personal on the lesson tee.

If you are serious about long term improvement, real effective change in your game, you will need to work on the fundamentals that will put you in a position from which you do not have to recover, or execute a “fit in” move to survive. Get a good high-definition, slow-motion look at your swing, get your Trackman or Flightscope feedback and take a close look, in terms of what I’m referring to here. It will be eye-opening to say the least.

I would agree that one CAN learn to live with some save moves and achieve a certain level of success, albeit less consistent in my opinion. In fact, when most people hit balls, that is what they are practicing. As always, it’s your call.  Enjoy the journey.

My online swing analysis program, is always available for a close look at your swing.

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Dennis Clark is a PGA Master Professional. Clark has taught the game of golf for more than 30 years to golfers all across the country, and is recognized as one of the leading teachers in the country by all the major golf publications. He is also is a seven-time PGA award winner who has earned the following distinctions: -- Teacher of the Year, Philadelphia Section PGA -- Teacher of the Year, Golfers Journal -- Top Teacher in Pennsylvania, Golf Magazine -- Top Teacher in Mid Atlantic Region, Golf Digest -- Earned PGA Advanced Specialty certification in Teaching/Coaching Golf -- Achieved Master Professional Status (held by less than 2 percent of PGA members) -- PGA Merchandiser of the Year, Tri State Section PGA -- Golf Professional of the Year, Tri State Section PGA -- Presidents Plaque Award for Promotion and Growth of the Game of Golf -- Junior Golf Leader, Tri State section PGA -- Served on Tri State PGA Board of Directors. Clark is also former Director of Golf and Instruction at Nemacolin Woodlands Resort. He now directs his own school, The Dennis Clark Golf Academy at the JW Marriott Marco Island in Naples, Fla.. He can be reached at dennisclarkgolf@gmail.com

11 Comments

11 Comments

  1. RBImGuy

    Mar 19, 2019 at 6:01 pm

    The solution to how the swing should work is coming

  2. geohogan

    Mar 6, 2019 at 8:10 pm

    Swing flaws are the cause of bad weight transfer.

    For a healthy human our subconscious balance system works perfectly to keep us upright.

    When we swing (move our body ) in such a way to jeopardize balance, our subconscious balance mechanism takes over , overriding the golf swing in order to keep us upright.

    EE, goat humping, OTT etc re the result of ignorance of golf swing and ignorance of how the body works, subconsciously. Understand tonus and the mind/body connection and our movements will be in balance.
    Let move, what needs to move.
    Ref. The Hogan Manual of Human Performance: GOLF, 1992

  3. Jeff Martin

    Mar 6, 2019 at 1:57 pm

    It starts with the grip. – Ben Hogan

    • Steve

      Mar 6, 2019 at 4:36 pm

      You described my 44 year swing perfectly: toe hit or over the top with my irons. I’d like to know how to approach correcting it. My current practice technique focuses on starting with my legs and try to hit push draws.

      • geohogan

        Mar 8, 2019 at 11:38 am

        @steve to correct OTT
        simply have one intent from top of the swing(every full swing)
        That intent is to keep the palm of your trail hand facing the sky.
        (waitor holding the tray , ring a bell?)

        Do that every time and you will never have a problem with OTT.
        cheers

  4. Ira Shoff

    Mar 6, 2019 at 12:27 pm

    Small wonder the phrase “golf is hard” goes around. Forget everything you read here and get Byron Nelsons Book “Winning Golf”

  5. Markus

    Mar 6, 2019 at 12:23 pm

    Symptoms vs root cause. All the body language and wrong positions have only one root cause. The payer wants to hit AT the ball, not THROUGH the ball. Wrong task = wrong kinetic chain. Change the focus and everything will fall in place.
    Check out and video tape people throwing the club out to a target. Everybody, even the so called non talents, have body language, positions and kinematic chain like a pro.
    The correct moves are already in our body. Change the focus will change the swing.
    We humans are no puppets, we are not design to consciously control our movements, we are much better following external focus, not internal focus.

  6. KevHat

    Mar 5, 2019 at 10:25 pm

    An “instructional video” that tells you everything youre doing wrong, but no solution. Fantastic.

  7. John f

    Mar 5, 2019 at 10:21 pm

    This guy pretty much just took a YT vid from Monte Scheinblum, paraphrased everything he said in the video, and slapped his own name on the article. smh.

  8. Dj

    Mar 5, 2019 at 6:17 pm

    If you are serious about long term improvement, real effective change in your game, you will need to work on the fundamentals that will put you in a position from which you do not have to recover, or execute a “fit in” move to survive. Get a good high-definition, slow-motion look at your swing, get your Trackman or Flightscope feedback and take a close look, in terms of what I’m referring to here. It will be eye-opening to say the least.

    I completely agree!

    • geohogan

      Mar 6, 2019 at 2:05 pm

      Get a good high-definition, slow-motion look at your swing.. and paralysis by analysis is bound to follow.

      The correct moves are already in our body. Change the focus will change the swing.
      We humans are no puppets, we are not design to consciously control our movements, we are much better following external focus, not internal focus…. Marcus

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Instruction

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In this week’s Impact Show, we analyze Jason Day’s golf swing and answer one question we get asked a lot. How do you start the downswing? We show you how Jason start’s the downswing and give you one simple swing thought that could make all the difference in creating a GREAT downswing.

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When you find yourself scratching your head because of all the putts you’re missing, take the time to hit the practice green and work out the kinks. All players go through slumps and face times when their stroke needs touching up, these three drills will go a long way in helping to reestablish a solid putting motion.

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This drill is great for focusing on center contact as well as helping to maintain a square putter face through impact.

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2. Coin Drill

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To perform this drill, just place the ball on top of the coin and make your stroke. Focusing on seeing the coin after you hit your putt before looking up.

3. Maintain the Triangle drill

One of the biggest things that I see in high handicap golfers or just bad putters, in general, is that they either don’t achieve an upside-down triangle from their shoulders, down the arms, and into the hands as pictured above. If they do, it often breaks down in their stroke. Either way, both result in an inconsistent strike and stroke motion. It also makes it harder to judge speed and makes it easier to manipulate the face which affects your ability to get the ball started online.

I use a plastic brace in the photo to hold my triangle, however, you can use a ball or balloon to place in between the forearms to achieve the same thing.

These three drills will help you establish proper muscle memory and promote strong techniques to help you roll the rock!

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Top 100 teacher Tom Stickney shows you a simple way to make sure you aren’t “flipping” or “slapping at” your pitch shots.

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