Connect with us

Equipment

Kevin Na’s Winning WITB: A Military Tribute at The Greenbrier 2018

Published

on

Driver: Callaway GBB Epic (9 degrees)
Shaft: Graphite Design Tour AD-GP 6TX

3 Wood: TaylorMade M3 (15 degrees)
Shaft: Project X EvenFlow Black

5 Wood: Titleist 915F (18 degrees)
Shaft: Mitsubishi Diamana BF-80 X-Flex

Hybrid: Titleist 818H2 (21 degrees)
Shaft: Graphite Design Tour AD-DI 95S

Irons: Titleist 716 T-MB (4-iron), Titleist 718 AP2 (5-PW)
Shafts: True Temper Dynamic Gold S400

Wedges: Titleist Vokey SM7 (54 degrees), Titleist Vokey Prototype (60 degrees)
Shafts: True Temper Dynamic Gold Tour Issue S400

Putter: Scotty Cameron Futura T5 MB

Golf Ball: Titleist Pro V1x

Grips: Golf Pride Tour Velvet 58R with one wrap of double-sided tape

Related

Your Reaction?
  • 234
  • LEGIT25
  • WOW7
  • LOL3
  • IDHT4
  • FLOP2
  • OB4
  • SHANK13

We share your golf passion. You can follow GolfWRX on Twitter @GolfWRX, Facebook and Instagram.

21 Comments

21 Comments

  1. moses

    Jul 10, 2018 at 7:45 am

    Looks like he just might pick up a hat sponsor soon. He gets paid for putting a Cally driver in his bag.

  2. cdj

    Jul 10, 2018 at 3:31 am

    Absolutely hated t-mb…hope “their” version is much improved in feel over retail.

  3. Dave r

    Jul 10, 2018 at 12:33 am

    Get the yardage and hit it . Great guy but really needs to speed it up just a tad. The talk between himself and his caddie is priceless .

  4. joro

    Jul 9, 2018 at 12:17 pm

    Congrats on the win Kevin, one of the nice guys on Tour. But for Gods sake get an alarm on your watch and speed up, it is tiring to see you on the clock every Tournament.

  5. Benjamin

    Jul 9, 2018 at 6:08 am

    Love seeing the sponsor-less mixed bag guys winning. It is very surprising that one of the top Korean male golfers doesn’t have more sponsors. Definitely seems like a good guy too. Love the banter with his caddy.

    • CrashTestDummy

      Jul 9, 2018 at 6:28 pm

      Me too. The banter is funny. Every amateur golfer can relate with it.

  6. S

    Jul 9, 2018 at 2:33 am

    Is it just me or is his GBB Epic driver actually smaller than the retail version?

    • Man

      Jul 9, 2018 at 11:27 am

      It’s just you. You’ve been staring at Rogue too long lmao

    • Michael Kutilek

      Jul 9, 2018 at 3:58 pm

      There was a 440cc version of the Epic that was available to the pros but never put out in retail. Phil used it for a while last year as did Alex Noren. I’m sure there were others.

    • JP

      Jul 9, 2018 at 5:02 pm

      Most of the pros use clubs that are different to retail. I’ve used some tour issue Taylor gear in the past that was unrecognisable besides the logos paint job etc.

  7. Tom

    Jul 9, 2018 at 1:23 am

    Seems like a really good guy, very good player. Congrats!

  8. Joe Taylor

    Jul 8, 2018 at 11:32 pm

    I like the putter.

  9. Ray

    Jul 8, 2018 at 11:29 pm

    He switches iron shafts often it seems

  10. DDuval

    Jul 8, 2018 at 10:55 pm

    When did Kevin Na stop playing his 917 Driver & switch to Callaway Epic ?

    • Man

      Jul 9, 2018 at 1:19 am

      That’s why he won, obviously. And his 3 wood change

    • Torqued

      Jul 9, 2018 at 2:38 am

      Switched right before the AT&T. Got it done at Aloha Golf in Vegas. I was in the shop watching him get fit for it on Trackman and he was moving it compared to his 917.

  11. Davis

    Jul 8, 2018 at 9:35 pm

    54* and 60*, nothing between the 54 and PW. I’ve noticed this with a few pros, any thoughts?

    • Fingers

      Jul 9, 2018 at 12:25 am

      And i thought i was the only weirdo that had just a 54 and 60. For me it works perfectly.
      Full swing yardages are PW=125, 54*=110 and 60*=85.
      50-60 yards (which i rarely leave myself) is around 1/2 54* or 3/4 60*
      30-40 yards is around 1/2 60*
      And if i want to get real technical with distance ill hit them up or down
      Since im good at random boneheaded moves at times i try to K.I.S.S.

    • Man

      Jul 9, 2018 at 1:21 am

      For those who feel they need a bit more length and better gapping in the longer clubs, this is what they’ll do, and compensate on the short end with working harder to knock down shots and gripping down, etc.

  12. The dude

    Jul 8, 2018 at 8:57 pm

    More great face shots …way to go

  13. gif

    Jul 8, 2018 at 8:30 pm

    Mixed WITB arsenal of weapons… no sponsorship….

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Equipment

Danny Willett’s Winning WITB: DP World Tour Championship

Published

on

Driver: Callaway Rogue (9 degrees)
Shaft: Mitsubishi Diamana W 60x

3-wood: Callaway Rogue Fairway Wood (15 degrees)
Shaft: Mitsubishi Diamana W 70X

Irons: Callaway X Forged Utility Irons (18, 21, 24 degrees), Callaway X Forged 18 Irons (5-9)
Shafts: True Temper Dynamic Gold X100 Superlite

Wedges: Callaway Mack Daddy Forged PW (48 degrees), Callaway Mack Daddy 4 Wedges (54, 58 degrees)
Shafts: True Temper Dynamic Gold

Putter: Odyssey Prototype (Stroke Lab)

Ball: Chrome Soft X

Your Reaction?
  • 14
  • LEGIT1
  • WOW2
  • LOL0
  • IDHT0
  • FLOP0
  • OB0
  • SHANK1

Continue Reading

Equipment

Club Building 101: Counterbalancing golf clubs

Published

on

Counterbalancing can take many forms, from higher balance point shafts, to heavier grips. This video explains how this relates to club building, along with the benefits of counterbalancing from both a player and design perspective.

Your Reaction?
  • 20
  • LEGIT5
  • WOW0
  • LOL1
  • IDHT1
  • FLOP1
  • OB0
  • SHANK12

Continue Reading

Equipment

Callaway redesigns Odyssey R-Ball Prototype using GE’s additive manufacturing

Published

on

Callaway has announced the company has signed a consultancy agreement with GE Additive’s AddWorks team, with the aim of improving its equipment through the potential of additive manufacturing. According to GE Additive’s website, additive manufacturing is a process that creates a physical object from digital design, enabling the creation of lighter, stronger parts and systems.

What does this mean for Callaway’s equipment?

The opening project from the agreement is a redesigned Odyssey R-Ball Prototype putter head. Callaway originally developed the Odyssey R-Ball Prototype as a tour preferred model in Japan, which consisted of removing the front ball from the original 2-ball design. Callaway, through additive manufacturing, has optimized the acoustics of the putter while retaining the preferred shape and performance.

 

Brad Rice, director – R&D, Advanced Engineering at Callaway, speaking about the process, stressed that the use of additive manufacturing is the future to the production of equipment in the game of golf, stating

“Additive manufacturing is a new tool; which is quickly going beyond the aspirational phase, and into the functionalization phase of the technology. Callaway needs to learn how to use this tool well because it is inevitable that 3D-Printing of production parts is going to happen – it is the production method of the future.”

So just how has Callaway and GE Additive collaborated to create the ideal acoustics on the Odyssey R-Ball Prototype putter head? Well, the answer is by adding geometry that made it difficult for conventional casting methods, which you can get a feel for in this short video.

For the Odyssey Prototype putter to retain its optimal design and shape while altering the acoustic signature of the putter head, Callaway and GE Additive’s AddWorks’ design and engineering teams implemented additive manufacturing through the following process:

  •  AddWorks provided guidance to Callaway, based on decades of additive design background spanning several industries.
  •  The team refined existing designs to the build direction to ensure all features were self-supported or easily supported during the build. The AddWorks team designed supports for thermal stresses and overhang constraints.
  •  Topology optimization was used in conjunction with acoustical mapping to create the optimal design.

According to GE Additive AddWorks general manager, Chris Schuppe, additive manufacturing is a method which we are going to be hearing of a lot down the line, and he is expecting this to be the first of many collaborations with Callaway

“We’re taking away many new learnings from our first project together, especially around aesthetics. We have also used additive technology to create an acoustic map, which is certainly a first for us. We’re looking forward to driving more successful projects with Callaway, as they continue their additive journey.”

What the future holds for Callaway’s products through the use of additive manufacturing remains to be seen. However, the company’s bold stance on the potential of the process enhancing their equipment could be telling.

Your Reaction?
  • 38
  • LEGIT0
  • WOW3
  • LOL5
  • IDHT1
  • FLOP1
  • OB1
  • SHANK14

Continue Reading

19th Hole

Facebook

Trending