Connect with us

pga tour

Why Dustin Johnson has a 64-degree TaylorMade Hi-Toe wedge in his bag

Published

on

A 64-degree wedge, DJ?! But why…

To answer this question, and others about his equipment changes heading into 2018, I recently spoke with Dustin Johnson and his fitter, Keith Sbarbaro (VP of Tour Operations at TaylorMade). Since DJ currently has some unreleased TaylorMade drivers and woods in the bag, we discussed his long-awaited official switch from his Tour Preferred MB 2014 irons into the new P-730 DJ Proto irons, his decision to put in a P-790 3 iron, and his new 64-degree TaylorMade Hi-Toe wedge — a club he plans to use throughout 2018. I also asked if he has any plans to switch out his Fujikura Speeder 661 Evolution 2.0 shaft in the near future.

See what Dustin and his fitter had to say about each of the changes below. Also, if you’re interested in hearing more from DJ, tune into our 19th hole podcast this week where he makes a guest appearance (or listen to the embed below).

The driver shaft

DJ says: “I don’t change driver shafts. I’ve had this shaft since I came out on Tour basically. I just like it.”

Keith says: “We mess around sometimes, but there’s just nothing better for him. And if it’s not broke… So when we do driver testing, we basically just have one variable to deal with.”

P-790 3 iron

DJ says: “I’m probably gonna go 4 thru pitching wedge [this year], then have a P-790 3 iron in the bag too. I got four wedges in the bag now, so I gotta get rid of either the [P-730] 3-iron or the 5 wood.”

Keith says: “He hits the P-790 3-iron about 260 yards, so it fills that yardage gap of his 5 wood.”

P-730 irons

DJ says: “I just got these blades in; they’re prototypes that are more like my Tour Preferreds. [The original DJ protos] were actually raw, but I waited for them to plate it. I’ve always played a chrome iron, and I prefer to look at that. But yea, these are gonna be in the bag (for 2018).”

Keith says: “The original [DJ protos] were milled and raw, and he was spinning them too much. With the chrome plating, he likes em way better.”

64 degree Hi-Toe TaylorMade wedge

DJ says: “I put this 64-degree wedge in play, and the 60-degree Hi-Toe too. I really like them. I just have a different face and grind than the normal ones. I like the more raw finish and can get more spin. The soles sit a bit closer to the ground… I’ve always had to manipulate my technique in the bunker, so the extra loft [on the 64-degree wedge] helps.”

Keith says: “The 64-degree helps because he’s a shut-face player. He’s had to manipulate his wrist to open the face [in the past]. Now, he can use a natural backswing… Rose was liking the 62-degree [Hi-Toe wedge] and was able to spin it so we kinda copied it for Dustin. He was hitting it from 50 yards and spinning it back 10 feet. I compare the Hi-Toe wedge to the Spider putter; it’s the one putter that everyone loved and it’s one of our best putters. This wedge reminds me of the Spider putters in that way. I think it’s the high CG. We could never get [the launch] low with spin because the ball would always shoot up the face. Now it doesn’t. I think it’s the high CG… [the face of his wedge] is more blasted.”

Related

Your Reaction?
  • 360
  • LEGIT48
  • WOW13
  • LOL6
  • IDHT10
  • FLOP6
  • OB4
  • SHANK24

Andrew Tursky is the Editor-in-Chief of GolfWRX. He played on the Hawaii Pacific University Men's Golf team and earned a Masters degree in Communications. He also played college golf at Rutgers University, where he graduated with a Bachelor of Arts in Journalism.

20 Comments

20 Comments

  1. Keith Nash

    Jan 8, 2018 at 4:48 pm

    Here are my two comments fior DJ that have nothing to do with his clubs but my observations.
    1. He must have a problem with his saliva glands as he is continuously spitting. Not s great habit.
    2. He should take some of his winnings and hire a speech coach. In almost every sentence he uses the expression ” you know” .
    During his short interview after his win he used those two words 13 times. Suggest he get together with Michele Wie and share the coach and expense as she has the sane malady.

  2. RG

    Jan 3, 2018 at 12:26 pm

    So now Traylor Made is doing a knock-off of the Ping Eye II wedge. Copying a design from the 1980’s and putting it out for the 2018 season, how original.

  3. Fore Golfer

    Jan 1, 2018 at 2:14 pm

    I had an old forged 60º flop wedge bent into the face so that the loft was nearly 70º!!!
    It’s a super-flop wedge and I can hit a ball and it goes behind me!!!
    Sometimes I use it to face backwards then and hit the ball forward!!!
    Lots of yuks from my buddies 🙂

  4. Jerry

    Dec 26, 2017 at 4:30 pm

    I see TM is going after the edel grooves out to the toe look like Callaway did with the PM Grind. That’s a different hosel, too – bore-thru?

    • Fore Golfer

      Jan 1, 2018 at 2:16 pm

      What happens when you high up on the toe with all those grooves?
      Are grooves necessary up on the toe or are they only ornamental?

  5. Brando

    Dec 22, 2017 at 8:03 pm

    I have to agree with how he does his driver fitting. Once you find a driver shaft that you like and does not do you wrong it’s hard to fiddle around. I been playing Fujikura 757 since the Titleist 983e days and just have not found anything I like better I don’t even bother with other shafts when I change drivers for me it’s a 757 all day probably till I die.

    • Rickie Towler

      Dec 23, 2017 at 4:18 am

      Wow so we all know now what set-up a hacker uses.

    • Rickie Towler

      Dec 23, 2017 at 4:19 am

      so we all know now what set-up a hacker uses.

  6. Carlos

    Dec 22, 2017 at 12:22 pm

    Yeah but is it really a 661X EVO or just a paint job on top of another shaft…

    Anyone have any info?

  7. ParPlayrCCC

    Dec 22, 2017 at 11:42 am

    Nice to see grooves all the way to the toe of the clubface. My grind would include grooves on the hozzle as well.

  8. Steve Sands

    Dec 21, 2017 at 11:22 pm

    The irons look like the Apex, the wedges are the 2015 PM’s, and the 3 iron is a PXG knock off. Taylor Made please think of something original.
    The R&D deptartment took the year off. Sergio got lucky. Boring.

  9. Ray

    Dec 21, 2017 at 8:07 pm

    DJ want back to his 2014 TP MB irons at the Hero World Challenge. Was reported on PGATour.com after the Hero event.

  10. BAbernathy

    Dec 21, 2017 at 7:46 pm

    Likely he doesn’t take any divot with the 64º wedge… only nips the ball off the grass with a full swing …. just like I do with my 1980 model 65º RAM Senator Trouble Shooter Pitching Wedge… it’s a miracle club from 50 yards in.

    • SK

      Dec 23, 2017 at 3:06 am

      What was old becomes new again and the wheel goes round and round …!

  11. DB

    Dec 21, 2017 at 3:03 pm

    Seems like more and more guys going to the 62-64 wedge. I know in this article they say he loves it from the bunker, but I can’t imagine him putting it in the bag just for bunker play. The main reason is probably due to lightning-fast green speeds and players needing either high-trajectory or high-spin options around the green.

  12. xjohnx

    Dec 21, 2017 at 2:52 pm

    Oh so TM made a PM wedge?

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Equipment

Tiger Woods’ Winning WITB: 2018 Tour Championship

Published

on

Driver: TaylorMade M3 460 (9.5 degrees)
Shaft: Mitsubishi Diamana D+ White 70TX

3 Wood: TaylorMade M3 (13 degrees)
Shaft: Mitsubishi Diamana D+ White 80TX

5 Wood: TaylorMade M3 (19 degrees)
Shaft: Mitsubishi Diamana D+ White 80TX

Irons: TaylorMade TW-Phase1 prototype (3-PW)
Shafts: True Temper Dynamic Gold Tour Issue X100

Wedges: TaylorMade Milled Grind Raw (56 and 60 degrees)
Shafts: True Temper Dynamic Gold Tour Issue S400

Putter: Scotty CameronNewport 2 GSS

Golf Ball: Bridgestone TourB XS

Grips: Golf Pride Tour Velvet Cord

Related

Photo via Bridgestone Golf

See what GolfWRX Members are saying about Tiger’s 2018 WITB

Your Reaction?
  • 389
  • LEGIT48
  • WOW8
  • LOL4
  • IDHT5
  • FLOP5
  • OB3
  • SHANK11

Continue Reading

Equipment

Sangmoon Bae’s Winning WITB: 2018 Albertsons Boise Open

Published

on

Driver: Callaway Rogue Sub Zero (10.5 degrees)
Shaft: Mitsubishi Tensei CK Blue 60X

Fairway Wood: Callaway Rogue (15 degrees)
Shaft: Mitsubishi Tensei CK Blue 80TX

Hybrid: Callaway Apex (20 degrees)
Shaft: Graphite Design Tour AD-DI 95X

Irons: Callaway MB1 (4-PW)
Shafts: Nippon N.S. Pro Modus3 125X

Wedges: Callaway Mack Daddy 4 (52, 56 and 60 degrees)
Shafts: True Temper Dynamic Gold S400

Putter: Odyssey O-Works Red #7 CH

Golf Ball: Titleist

Your Reaction?
  • 43
  • LEGIT1
  • WOW1
  • LOL0
  • IDHT0
  • FLOP0
  • OB1
  • SHANK2

Continue Reading

Opinion & Analysis

Do you actually understand “Strokes Gained” stats? Here’s a breakdown

Published

on

In 2011, the PGA Tour introduced ShotLink, which is a real-time scoring system that captures data points on all shots taken during PGA Tour events. ShotLink measures the distance from the hole, as well as categorizing shot types like tee, fairway, rough, sand, and green.

Mark Broadie, a professor at Columbia Business School, took the data from ShotLink and helped develop a new way to analyze putting performance. This new statistic was called “strokes gained: putting,” and it measures the number of putts a golfer takes relative to the PGA Tour average from that same distance. Strokes gained putting recognizes that sinking a 20-foot putt represents a better performance than sinking a three-foot putt, even though they both count as a single putt and a single stroke on the scorecard.

This was revolutionary because golfers no longer had to rely on the number of putts per round to understand their putting performance. Strokes gained also provided a unified way to measure an individual golfer against his opponents on the PGA Tour.

In 2016, the same concept used for strokes gained: putting was applied to other areas of the game. The PGA Tour developed new statistics including “strokes gained: off-the-tee,” “strokes gained: approach-the-green,” and “strokes gained: around-the-green.” This expansion allowed a PGA Tour golfer to precisely see where he excels and where he needs to improve.

What is strokes gained

In the most simple terms, “strokes gained” is a way to measure a player’s performance compared to the rest of the field. It also allows you to isolate different parts of a player’s game. In order to understand the statistic, you have to know that the PGA Tour has historical data from ShotLink that has calculated the average number of strokes needed to hole out from every distance and location on a course. Below I have included four scenarios to better illustrate the idea of strokes gained.

The scenarios below show how strokes gained could work on a single hole. Remember most strokes gained statistics are the aggregate of all the holes for a players round.

Scenario No. 1: Driving

You are playing a 450-yard par 4. The PGA Tour scoring average for a par 4 of that length is 4.1 strokes.

You hit a drive that ends up in the fairway, 115 yards from the hole. The PGA Tour scoring average from in the fairway, 115 yards out is 2.825 strokes. In order to calculate strokes gained: off-the-tee you use the formula below

(PGA Tour average for the hole) – (PGA Tour average left after your drive) – 1 = strokes gained: off-the-tee

Next, plug the numbers from the scenario above into this formula to calculate the strokes gained: off-the-tee

4.100 – 2.825 = 1.275 – 1 = 0.275 strokes gained: off-the-tee

Since you hit your drive in the fairway 115 yards from the hole you gained .275 strokes off the tee from the average PGA Tour player.

Scenario No. 2: Approach Shot

Let’s take the same drive from the first scenario. You hit a drive on a par 4 that ends up in the fairway, 115 yards from the hole. The PGA Tour scoring average from in the fairway 115 yards out is 2.825. You hit your approach shot on the green 10 feet from the hole. The PGA Tour scoring average from on the green 10 feet from the hole is 1.61 strokes.

(PGA Tour average from your approach) – (PGA Tour average for your putt) – 1 = strokes gained: approach-the-green

2.825 – 1.61 = 1.215 – 1 = .215 strokes gained: approach-the-green

Since you hit your approach shot to 10 feet you gained .213 strokes from the average PGA Tour player.

Scenario No. 3: Putting

Continuing the scenario from example scenario No. 2. You have a 10-foot putt left for birdie which you make.

(Your # of Putts) – (PGA Tour average from that distance) = strokes gained putting

1 putt – 1.61 = .61 strokes gained putting

Since you made that 10-foot putt you gained .61 strokes from the average PGA Tour player.

Scenario No. 4: Total for the hole:

To calculate strokes gained total use the formula below:

Strokes gained off-the-tee + Strokes gained approach-the-green + strokes gained around-the-green + strokes gained putting= strokes gained total

0.275+.215+0+.61=1.1 Total Strokes Gained on that hole

This makes sense because the PGA Tour average for the hole was 4.1 and you made a 3.

Definitions of Strokes Gained Statistics

  • Strokes gained: off-the-tee: Measures player performance off the tee on all par 4s and par 5s. This statistic looks at how much better or worse a player’s drive is then the average PGA Tour player.
  • Strokes gained: approach-the-green: Measures player performance on approach shots and other shots that are NOT included in strokes gained: around-the-green and strokes gained: putting. It does include tee shots on par 3s.
  • Strokes gained: around-the-green: Measures player performance on any shot within 30 yards of the edge of the green without measuring putting.
  • Strokes gained: putting: Measures how many strokes a player gains (or loses) on the greens compared to PGA Tour average.
  • Strokes gained: tee-to-green:  Strokes gained: off-the-tee + strokes gained: approach-the-green + strokes gained: around-the-green
  • Strokes gained: total: Strokes gained: off-the-tee + strokes gained: approach-the-green + strokes gained: around-the-green + strokes gained: putting
Your Reaction?
  • 204
  • LEGIT18
  • WOW17
  • LOL3
  • IDHT1
  • FLOP0
  • OB1
  • SHANK7

Continue Reading

19th Hole

Facebook

Trending