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Spotted: A TaylorMade “M4” driver (via Instagram)

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We’ve spotted two photos of a TaylorMade M4 driver making the rounds on Instagram and in our TaylorMade M3/M4 forum thread. While Instagram username “Golfization” — whom we believe to be the originator of the photos — has been deleted, below is a screenshot of the original post. The photos have since been shared by a variety of other Instagram users, as well. TaylorMade currently has no comment on the photos or the driver.

Based on the photos of the driver, it appears that the TaylorMade M4 pictured has the company’s “Geocoustic” technology that uses geometries to improve sound and feel. It also displays a new “Hammerhead” technology, based on writing written on a slot in the sole of the driver in the photo above. Even if the photo does not picture an M4 that will hit retail, the photo at least shows that TaylorMade has made a driver that goes away from it’s popular white-centric color scheme, replacing it with silver, much like a previous SLDR S design.

Is this TaylorMade’s new M4? That question has yet to be answered. But click here to see what GolfWRX members are saying about the Instagram photos.

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30 Comments

30 Comments

  1. Joro

    Nov 13, 2017 at 11:46 am

    Y’all better run out and get in line, cause with that amazing Driver you will be so much longer and is what it is all about, can’t play a lick, but long. And that is a promise from TM. No guarantee, but a promise. Hurry and get you one. lololololol

  2. MuskieCy

    Nov 11, 2017 at 8:18 pm

    Raider Nation will eat it up.

  3. Bernard

    Nov 11, 2017 at 10:57 am

    I actually like it quite a bit because it definitely has looks of BMW. Enough for a lawsuit or some agreement to be in place. Porche has trademark on their fonts, would be surprised if BMW did not go just as far.

  4. Bobby Wallace

    Nov 11, 2017 at 10:35 am

    The silver looks horrible. Black and white looked amazing.

  5. Had Enuff

    Nov 10, 2017 at 11:58 pm

    M4 — Febr’18
    M5 — June’18
    M6 — Nov’18
    M7 — Mar’19
    M8 — ??????

  6. Mr Muira

    Nov 10, 2017 at 11:07 pm

    Taylormade have only ever built one club (an iron) that was good, but they don’t even know it. They jagged the design of it. If they knew they would bring it back. The R9 tour.

  7. Anthony

    Nov 10, 2017 at 10:29 pm

    HammerHead? Oh my god, it all started with rockets and nutz ????

    TaylorMade, Your dead to many people!!!

  8. F the French

    Nov 10, 2017 at 10:04 pm

    As long as it performs, and that the head isn’t too light like the retail M2, but as heavy as the SLDR

  9. steve c

    Nov 10, 2017 at 8:40 pm

    Taylormade cash-grab? I think so…

  10. Bob Rockwell

    Nov 10, 2017 at 4:17 pm

    The silver looks like sh*t. Go back to white with black.

    • Joe Dallas

      Nov 10, 2017 at 4:47 pm

      I agree, no comparison between this and the old M1’s and M2’s. Which are not that old LOL The white and black color schemes look amazing. This is so muhhhhhhhhh.

      • Bo Pence

        Nov 10, 2017 at 4:49 pm

        Hopefully they will have color options,(white on black, grey on black, and black on black etc) That would be great!

  11. SUHDUDE

    Nov 10, 2017 at 4:12 pm

    The Ultimate Copyright Infringement Machine

    • Mr. Replier Guy

      Nov 10, 2017 at 4:35 pm

      This.
      Pandering to wannabe Bimmerheads.

  12. Taylormade Fan

    Nov 10, 2017 at 4:05 pm

    Can’t stand the grey with the black. The white looks so much better. Why can’t they just keep the crown like it was?

  13. etc.

    Nov 10, 2017 at 2:53 pm

    Looks like no sliding or screw-in weights, just some fancy internal structures to reinforce the driver head and give the impression that it’s something important for performance. Another semi-annual WITB scam for gullible gearheads.

    • Brian

      Nov 10, 2017 at 5:43 pm

      I’m guessing there will be an “M3” version with the adjustable weights.

  14. CB

    Nov 10, 2017 at 1:41 pm

    Does its engine catch fire and explode like made-in-USA junk BMWs too? lmao

    • Terry (TMAC)

      Dec 14, 2017 at 9:03 pm

      Hmmm……never had that happen to any of my BMW’s. SMH

  15. John K

    Nov 10, 2017 at 1:20 pm

    Make the top all honeycomb black and I’m in. Really don’t like the multiple colors.

  16. Bishop

    Nov 10, 2017 at 1:20 pm

    I wonder how much in royalties BMW will be receiving from Taylormade… if none, I’m sure we can expect to see a lawsuit in the near future.

    I suppose the slogan can still remain the same for both companies, though: “The Ultimate Driving Machine”.

    • saveva

      Nov 10, 2017 at 1:48 pm

      lawsuits? I guess if BMW also applied their trademarks to golf equipment…

      • Bishop

        Nov 10, 2017 at 3:20 pm

        Or a trademark on the “M4” emblem…

        • Mr. Divot

          Nov 10, 2017 at 4:25 pm

          When you apply for a trademark, it has to be specified which category the trademark will be used. Then you have to prove usage in that category after receiving the trademark. Also, you can’t use a super broad description of intended trademark usage so that it covers a bunch of different industries and uses, when in reality, you plan to only use it in one or two particular industry categories. It’s doubtful BMW applied for usage of the ‘M4’ trademark in the golf club category, although they definitely would have applied for clothing, so there may be some overlap there.

    • xjohnx

      Nov 10, 2017 at 3:52 pm

      I’m not a lawyer so I wont comment on the legality of it but, I think calling them M3/M4 and using this color scheme is just flat out desperate and disrespectful.

  17. Scott

    Nov 10, 2017 at 1:15 pm

    Boo ya baby! Gonna be an expensive spring. Can’t wait to read what tweaks they made. Is Sergio crying now or is he already dialing in on an epic now? Wow

  18. nyguy

    Nov 10, 2017 at 12:47 pm

    meh… awful M4 logo like the m1 logo, just awful.. Taylormade needs a new art director… does this club come with the purchase of a BMW M-series???

  19. dude

    Nov 10, 2017 at 11:55 am

    I thought RM said it was the ball anyway? Is that silver?

  20. Spitfisher

    Nov 10, 2017 at 11:54 am

    M4, Looks like a BMW rear badge

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Equipment

Ping’s new Glide 2.0 “Stealth” wedges, and Vault 2.0 putters

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Today, in addition to the G400 Max driver and the G700 irons, Ping also launched Glide 2.0 Stealth wedges, and the Vault 2.0 putters that we first spotted at the 2018 Sony Open in Hawaii. Each of the products are currently available for pre-order. See below for tech info, photos and more about the offerings.

Glide 2.0 Stealth wedges

Unlike the original Glide 2.0 wedges, which were made from 431 stainless steel, the Glide 2.0 Stealth wedges are made from 8620 carbon steel for a softer feel. More obviously, they have a different, darker finish that reduces glare and “makes the wedges seem smaller,” according to Ping. The finish is applied using something called a Quench Polish Quench process for greater durability.

The wedges also have a milled, wheel-cut “half-groove” near the leading edge of the higher-lofted wedges (56, 58 and 60 degrees) to increase spin on shots hit low on the face.

Like the Glide 2.0 wedges, the Stealth versions also have progressive groove designs, which means the grooves in the lower-lofted wedges (46, 50 and 52 degrees) have a larger edge radius than the higher-lofted wedges. Therefore, the lower-lofted wedges will perform a bit more like irons, while the higher-lofted wedges will have additional spin for more control around the greens.

The Stealth wedges come in 17 loft-grind combinations, as listed below:

  • SS Grind (46-12, 50-12, 52-12, 54-12, 56-12, 58-10 and 60-10)
  • WS Grind (54-14, 56-14, 58-14 and 60-14)
  • TS Grind (58-06 and 60-06)
  • ES Grind (54-08, 56-08, 58-08 and 60-08)

They come stock with either Ping’s AWT 2.0 steel shaft ($150) or Ping’s CFS graphite shaft ($175). Additional shafts are also available at no upcharge.

Click here for discussion and more photos of the wedges

Vault 2.0 putters

Ping’s new Vault 2.0 putters have a greater focus than ever on fitting. Using a new custom-weighting system, the putters are available with either steel sole plates, tungsten sole plates that are 15-grams heavier than steel, or aluminum sole plates that are 15 grams lighter than steel. Putters between 34 and 36 inches use steel, putters 36 and longer use aluminum, and putters 34 inches and shorter use tungsten. This allows golfers to have a putter with the correct feel and balance no matter the length.

The 100-percent-milled putters also use Ping’s True Roll technology in their faces, evident by the pattern of cross-hatched grooves that are varied in depth across the face to increase speed on off-center hits. The goal with this face design is to get the speed the golfer needs on longer putts, even if the contact is on the heel or toe.

Five of the putter models (aside from the Ketsch) are made from 303 stainless steel and are available in three finishes: Stealth, Platinum and Copper. The Ketsch mallet is available in two finishes, Stealth or Slate, and combines a 6061 Aluminum body with a stainless steel sole plate. Grip options for the putters include the PP60 (a midsize design with foam under-listing), the PP61 (an “exaggerated pistol” with a rubber under-listing), the PP62 (over-sized with a rounded profile) or the CB60 (the standard counterbalanced grip).

Get the specs for each of the new Vault 2.0 putters below, which sell for $325 apiece.

Vault 2.0 Dale Anser

The new Dale Anser is “inspired by one of the original Anser putter molds created by Allan Dale Solheim and detailed by his father, Karsten Solheim,” according to Ping.

  • Weight: 350 grams
  • Toe Hang: Slight Arc
  • Standard length: 35 inches
  • Loft: 3 degrees
  • Lie Angle: Adjustable +/- 4 degrees

See more photos here.

Vault 2.0 Voss

  • Weight: 350 grams
  • Finish: Available in Stealth finish (Copper or Platinum available on special order)
  • Toe Hang: Slight Arc
  • Length: 35 inches
  • Loft: 3 degree
  • Lie Angle: Adjustable +/- 4 degrees

See more photos here.

Vault 2.0 B60

  • Weight: 355 grams
  • Finish: Available in Stealth or Copper finish (Platinum available special order)
  • Toe Hang: Slight Arc
  • Length: 35 inches
  • Loft: 3 degrees
  • Lie Angle: Adjustable +/- 4 degrees

See more photos here.

Vault 2.0 ZB

  • Weight: 350 grams
  • Finish: Available in Platinum (Copper or Stealth available special order)
  • Toe Hang: Slight Arc
  • Length: 35 inches
  • Loft: 3 degrees
  • Lie Angle: Adjustable +/- 4 degrees

See more photos here.

Vault 2.0 Piper (Mid-Mallet)

  • Weight: 360 grams
  • Finish: Available in Stealth finish (Copper or Platinum available special order)
  • Toe Hang: Slight Arc or Straight
  • Length: 35 inches
  • Loft: 3 degrees
  • Lie Angle: Adjustable +/- 2 degrees

See more photos here.

Vault 2.0 Ketsch (Mallet)

  • Weight: 365 grams
  • Finish: Available in Stealth finish (Slate finish available special order)
  • Toe Hang: Slight Arc or Straight
  • Length: 35 inches
  • Loft: 3 degrees
  • Lie Angle: Adjustable +/- 2 degrees

Click here for discussion and more photos of the putters.

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Equipment

Ping’s new G700 irons are its “longest, highest flying” irons ever

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On the same day Ping launched “the most forgiving driver in golf” with its G400 Max driver, it also launched the company’s “longest, highest flying irons to date,” according to Ping. To achieve that level of distance and forgiveness on the G700 irons, Ping gave them hollow-body constructions with 17-4 Stainless Steel bodies and maraging steel faces.

The hollow body and geometry of the G700 designs, according to Ping, positions weight away from their faces. Like the design of a metalwood, this allows the face to flex, thus raising ball speeds on shots hit all over the face. Also like Ping’s metalwoods, the G700 irons use C300 maraging steel — “one of the strongest alloys in the world,” according to Ping — on its faces. Since the material is so strong and the faces can be made thinner, the faces flex more than previous Ping irons, without sacrificing durability; this leads to greater ball speeds and more forgiveness on off-center hits.

“The desire for golfers to hit their irons farther continues to grow,” said John Solheim, president of Ping. “We want to provide options that greatly increase distance without sacrificing other performance attributes, such as consistency, forgiveness and feel. With the G700 iron, we’ve been able to accomplish all of that in a very appealing design with a sound that screams distance from the moment golfers hit it.

The high-performance construction also comes in an iron design that is aesthetically reminiscent of the iBlade, although the G700 irons have a larger profile, more offset, and thicker soles for more forgiveness through the turf. The lower and more rearward CG (center of gravity) will also help the ball fly not only straighter and farther, but higher, as well.

Like Ping irons of recent years, the G700 irons also have a HyrdoPearl chrome finish that enhances something called hydrophobicity, or the ability of an object to repel water. That means the irons are designed to reduce the effect of water between the golf and the golf club.

The G700 irons (4-9, PW, UW and SW) comes in 10 different color codes, or lie angles, and they come stock with either Ping AWT 2.0 steel shafts (R, S and X), or three different graphite options: Ping’s Alta CB (counterbalanced), UST’s Recoil 760 ES SmacWrap or UST’s Recoil 780 ES SmacWrap. The irons, which are available for pre-order now, will sell for $160 per iron in steel or $175 per iron in graphite. Additional after-market shafts are available for no upcharge, including True Temper’s Dynamic Gold series, Project X LZ shafts, Nippon’s N.S. Pro Modus 105, KBS Tour shafts and more.

Discussion: See what GolfWRX members are saying about the Ping G700 irons in our forums

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Equipment

Ping launches new G400 Max driver, the “most forgiving driver in golf”

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As initially expected, the Ping G400 Max driver that officially launched today is made for more forgiveness, with a larger construction than it’s original G400 family members. In 2017, Ping launched its G400 driver line that included a standard model, a draw-biased SF Tec and a fade-biased LS Tec, each of which measured 445cc — below the 460cc legal limit of the USGA. Despite the smaller sizes, which helped reduce drag for more club head speed, they were actually more forgiving than their G-family predecessors due to aerodynamic improvements, thinner crowns, strategically-placed Tungsten weights and a new TS9+ titanium face.

Now, Ping’s new G400 Max driver has even more forgiveness than the already super-forgiving G400 drivers due to its larger size and additional weight in the rear of the golf club. Like the original G400 drivers, the G400 Max has a rear tungsten weight, except it’s even farther back and actually wraps around the sole of the G400 Max. The design means CG (center of gravity) is extremely low and rearward in the club head, and MOI (moment of inertia, a measure of forgiveness) is the highest reported on the market… or in other words, according to Ping, it’s the most forgiving driver out.

“Our engineers focused on increasing the forgiveness of the driver while maintaining the distance gains and powerful sound of the original G400 driver,” said John Solheim, the president of Ping. “It’s remarkable how long and straight the G400 Max flies. The forgiveness is off the charts and leads to tighter dispersion, which reveals just how consistent your distance and accuracy results will be on the golf course. We encourage all golfers to get fit and look closely at their dispersion, not just their one best shot on a launch monitor.”

When you hear about max forgiveness, you typically assume it’s a game-improvement driver that’s made for high-handicappers, right? While this driver will help recreational golfers who need help on off-center hits, the G400 Max driver is already in the bags of Ping staffers Aaron Baddeley and Seamus Power, and non-staffer Tony Finau, one of the longest drivers on the PGA Tour. According to Ping, despite having a larger size than the original G400 drivers, the G400 Max is still able to produce speed because of its forged, heat-treated T9S+ face that has a “thinner, hotter” impact area that raises ball speed.

Like the G400 drivers, the G400 Max comes stock with an Alta CB (counterbalanced) shaft that uses special, color-shifting paint technology to look great on the shelf with its copper color, but it looks black at address to reduce distractions. Read more about the shaft technology here. Ping’s Alta CB shaft is available in 55 (SR, R, S or X flex). Additional shaft options include Ping’s Tour 65 or 75 (R, S or X) for a $35 upcharge, or the following aftermarket shaft options for a $75 upcharge: Mitsubishi Kuro Kage Silver Dual-Core TiNi 60 (R, S or X flex), Project X HZRDUS Yellow 75 (5.5, 6.0 or 6.5 flex) or Aldila’s X-Torsion Copper (50R or 60S) shaft.

Ping’s G400 Max drivers, which are available now for pre-order, come in 9 and 10.5 degree options and with Golf Pride Tour Velvet 360 grips. They start selling for $435 apiece, plus any additional upcharges for shafts.

Discussion: See what GolfWRX members are saying about the Ping G400 Max drivers in our forums.

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