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Bettinardi launches new Antidote putters in 3 different head shapes

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In January of 2017, Bettinardi introduced an Antidote prototype on Tour that used weights on top of a blade-style putter to raise the center of gravity (CG) toward the equator of the golf ball for a faster end-over-end roll. At the 2017 WGC-Bridgestone Invitational in August, we spotted a new Antidote prototype; this time, it was a nearly square-mallet head, also with weights on top for the same purpose… to raise CG for a better roll.

Today, Bettinardi announced that it’s officially launching Antidote putters to retail in three different head shapes — 5 models in total.

BettinardiAntidoteGolfWRX

The Antidote putters (Model 1, Model 2 and Model 3), like the prototypes that preceded the official launch, use weights on the top half of the putters to raise CG closer to the equator of the golf ball, which Bettinardi says produces a quicker “end-over-end” rotation of the ball. The positioning of the weights also produce higher MOI (moment of forgiveness, a measure of forgiveness), which help offset off-center hits.

The retail versions of the Antidote putters have a carbon matte black finish, and they come with three weights; aluminum (5 grams), stainless steel (10 grams) and copper (15 grams). They are available today, selling for $550 each.

Check out graphic images of each of the models below.

Model 1

Model 2

Model 2 Center-Shafted

Model 2 Left-Handed

Model 3

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He played on the Hawaii Pacific University Men's Golf team and earned a Masters degree in Communications. He also played college golf at Rutgers University, where he graduated with a Bachelor of Arts in Journalism.

20 Comments

20 Comments

  1. BN

    Oct 18, 2017 at 12:04 pm

    BRING BACK THE BB32

  2. Larry Cooper

    Oct 13, 2017 at 9:47 am

    I’d rather stay sick with the plague that take this Antidote. I love my BB1 and Betti blade. These are terrible. Please don’t do this again Bob.

    1,2,3 are Bad, Terrible, the worst.

  3. DB

    Oct 12, 2017 at 12:53 pm

    Hey, the Model 3 looks pretty nice. Clean and simple aside from the weights. But the website says it is 1/4 toe hang? Is that right? If you’re going to make a classic shape why not do the classic 1/2 toe hang?

  4. M. Vegas

    Oct 11, 2017 at 6:25 pm

    If these were any uglier….
    They’d be Brian’s mom

  5. MB

    Oct 11, 2017 at 5:40 pm

    I like the Number 2. That giant fly swatter works for me. I wish there was one with a flow neck

  6. BB

    Oct 11, 2017 at 1:23 pm

    If you like the square don’t sleep on the BB55. Been gaming mine for 3 years now and love it. Feel is there too, unlike many larger mallet style putters.

  7. Shawn K

    Oct 11, 2017 at 10:57 am

    Been trying to replace my Bobby Grace V-foil but nothing can touch it. Maybe the square one here as the Betti feel is as close to it as I have felt. We’ll see. Actually, I changed my mind. If it ain’t broke!

  8. cosmos411

    Oct 11, 2017 at 10:05 am

    For $550 I better be able to pick up my ball with the back of the putter!

    • Jeffrey

      Oct 12, 2017 at 2:20 am

      You should be picking it out of the hole.

      • Robert Parsons

        Oct 12, 2017 at 3:28 pm

        Maybe he wants it to come with the suction cup at the end of the grip? Hahaha

        Nobody makes suction cups like we do. Period.

        • Jeffrey

          Oct 13, 2017 at 5:48 am

          Your line up of rollers looks awesome. Is the suction cup an optional extra? LOL.

  9. Jon

    Oct 10, 2017 at 5:22 pm

    It looks like they beat PGX to the punch on this group, minus the excessive amount of screws.

    • alvin

      Oct 10, 2017 at 9:43 pm

      Plenty of ‘screws’ here, particularly for $550…..

  10. Steve I

    Oct 10, 2017 at 4:57 pm

    I’m amazed, amazed, at all the fantastic engineering that has gone into all three models.
    The square mallet headed putter has got to be the final solution to putting, not to mention the fantastic metallurgy and machining that has gone into the head.
    I love the markings on the putter soul and the pride of bagging a Made in USA putter…. and only $550 plus sales tax …. which can be amortized over the next 10 year for ~$60+ per year cost.
    It’s a steal and worth every penny for what must be a guided missile putter.

  11. Tider992010

    Oct 10, 2017 at 4:29 pm

    too much money. too much square. too much everything. Sad thing is, I love Bettinardi’s.

    • etc.

      Oct 10, 2017 at 6:50 pm

      How deep is your love for Bettinardi’s?…. share your feeelings.

  12. Milo

    Oct 10, 2017 at 3:22 pm

    Mmm, that model 2 center shafted putter looks delicious too bad I’m not spending 550 bucks on a putter.

    • etc.

      Oct 10, 2017 at 6:51 pm

      …. and they don’t even provide instructions on how to use this Antidotal putter… not really a bargain, is it?!!

      • Milo

        Oct 10, 2017 at 9:42 pm

        I’ve been gaming an OG Futura since release but switched it up this year, bought a Callaway The Tuttle for 10 bucks and sold the Futura, kinda miss the big spaceship.

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Equipment

What GolfWRXers are saying about iron covers

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@thegolfinggreen

In our forums, our members have been discussing iron covers with WRXer ‘anythingfinite’ championing the use of iron covers when walking. As a walker, ‘anythingfinite’ says

“I hated the sound of clubs clanking together with every step. So I used neoprene iron covers and endured the ridicule for years. They never, ever slowed my play as I average 18 holes in a little over 2.5hrs playing by myself. It was never about protecting resale value, just about the noise.”

And our members have been discussing iron covers and whether they currently use them or would be tempted to use them in the future.

Here are a few posts from the thread, but make sure to check out the entire discussion and have your say at the link below.

  • jvincent: “Clanking irons in the bag is like the sound of metal spikes on a path. It’s old school golf.”
  • Z1ggy16: “Toss your club cleaning towel in the clubs to help stop them from clanking *as much*. You can also use your one hand to kind of hold some of them in place as you walk.”
  • Windlaker_1: “I use the neoprene covers. Not for resale value, as I normally keep them so long they aren’t worth diddley-poo at that point. Use them to maintain a nice-looking set of irons.”
  • MtlJeff: “I don’t really notice it that much when I walk, to be honest. Maybe its how I arrange my clubs….If the clanging is bothering me, you can just move the clubs slightly, and it usually mitigates it. But if you’re like, breakdancing down the fairway, tough to stop it.”
  • puttingmatt: “It’s your choice. I use iron covers, lets me not forget a club around the green, as the cover in pocket is a quick reminder that something is a miss. Also, it’s a good way to protect your clubs, and at these prices, makes you wonder why not since woods and putters are sold with covers that are intended to be used. One other note, it may keep others from assessing what’s in the bag, and keep a thief wondering if the bag is worth the effort. Hate the feeling about club theft, but clubs are targets.”

Entire Thread: “Confessions of an iron cover user”

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Is 8 degrees between pitching wedge and sand wedge too much? – GolfWRXers have their say

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In our forums, our members have been discussing gapping degrees and whether 8-degrees between your PW and SW is too much. WRXer ‘jonsnow’ seldom hits his GW and is considering dropping the club from the bag and wants to know, if he does so, will the current 8-degree gap between his wedges be too much. Our members have their say.

Here are a few posts from the thread, but make sure to check out the entire discussion and have your say at the link below.

  • ZA206: “For years I played a 47 PW and a 56 SW. I had a big hole in my scoring irons range (115-105 yards) that I tried to avoid at all costs. It cost me many strokes over the years. I felt like that gap was way too big and eventually settled on 46, 51, 55 (I also play a 60 LW) as my preferred setup. No gaps and I can hit every yardage without any issue. I’m a much better wedge player now than I ever was back then, but that’s not due to having more wedges, that’s more about technique.”
  • RainShadow: “In theory, yes. In actual real world action, depends on how many types of shots you can hit with the PW.”
  • MtlJeff: “I’ve played with 52 to 60 gaps. It depends on what type of shots you want to hit. I never chip with sand wedge and would rather hit a 3/4 shot with a 52 than a full with a 56. So it all depends on your game.”
  • bazinky: “A lot depends on how often you have shots in that yardage range. For example, I replaced my 50 and 54 with a single 52 wedge because I hardly ever had a yardage that required my 50 (I would sometimes go weeks without ever hitting it). That said, my biggest gap is 6 degrees. I think it’s doable as long as you have the discipline to be smart when you have a bad yardage. It can be tough to just aim for the fat of the green when you have a wedge in your hand.”
  • Pingistheanser: “I don’t think so. I’m more of a believer that you should pick lofts based upon the distances that you need to hit from. If those lofts allow you to hit distances that you need to hit, then they’re fine for you. I’m not a believer that you should have 4-degree gaps between your wedges because what good is a club that you never hit because you never find yourself in that distance range? For a time last year, I carried a 46-degree AW and a 56 degree as my only wedges, and they worked just fine. I’d sometimes have to make some adjustments if I found myself 90 yards off of the green because it would be too far for the 56, so I would just narrow my stance, grip down a bit and only swing the AW at about 75%.”

Entire Thread: “Is 8 degrees between PW and SW too much?”

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Equipment

Are modern irons with stronger lofts easier/harder to hit than older irons? – GolfWRXers have their say

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In our forums, our members have been discussing modern irons with stronger lofts and whether they are easier or harder to play than older irons. WRXer ‘harpu728’ kicks off the thread saying:

“Being that higher-lofted irons within the same set are easier to hit (i.e. an 8 iron is easier to hit than a 6 iron), I’m trying to draw comparisons to modern irons with stronger lofts, and if these lofts make them harder to hit in theory.

My 10-year-old’s 7 iron is 33 degrees and carries about 150. When comparing this to some of the newer sets out there where 7-irons are slightly longer (club length) and have lofts of 30 degrees, would this mean that ‘on paper’ the modern 7-iron is ‘harder’ to hit than my 10-year old’s 7 iron? Or should I be comparing my 7-iron to the modern 8-iron, which would likely carry as far as my current 7-iron?”

And our members have been weighing in with their thoughts in our forum.

Here are a few posts from the thread, but make sure to check out the entire discussion and have your say at the link below.

  • CAT GOLFER: “Good question, the way I understand it, disregard the number on the bottom of the club. A stronger(lower) loft in newer irons will produce a higher ball flight than the weaker(higher) loft in older clubs. At least that is the marketing pitch. The intent is to make it easier to launch the ball higher and in the process easier to hit. Also, keep in mind modern clubs also have more forgiveness built into them. Stronger lofted, higher launching, easier to hit if you buy the whole pitch.”
  • Sean2: “I don’t pay attention to the number on the club, so much as the loft. With the stronger lofts, I have no long irons in my bag as I simply can’t hit them…maybe being 65 has something to do with it as well, lol. At one time I carried 4-iron on down, now it’s 7-iron on down. But no way I can hit a 18º-19º 4-iron, let alone a 21º 5. I have the same number of irons…they just have a different number/letter on them than they did before.”
  • Warrick: “Important to pair the right shaft with these new iron setups, more so than ever.”
  • puttingmatt: “Look at it like this, instead of missing the green with a standard lofted 7 iron, now you can miss the green with the strong lofted 8 iron. I do not think the modern lofted irons translate into better scores or better misses for golfers. The loft alone is not going to turn a 5hc into a scratch player.”
  • lil’mike: “I guess you could say it something like this. Nowadays when you use a 5 iron, you get the height of a 6 iron but the distance of a 4 iron! Lol. I do think that it can make it hard to hold greens with the irons producing lower spin or at least too low of spin like some reviewers have mentioned in some cases. The bad thing about the stronger lofts is that they are getting to the point of needing two-gap wedges now before you reach the loft spacing that a sand wedge loft of 56 degrees has. For example, the new Mavrik irons have two gap wedges. So it is a 4 iron at 18 degrees, a PW is 41, so AW is 46 and GW is 51. I think that is getting ridiculous as they are turning the stock set makeup from 3-PW to 6-double gap wedge! lol”

Entire Thread: “Are modern irons with stronger lofts easier/harder to hit than older irons?”

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