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Titleist’s 818 H1, H2 Aim To Be Golf’s Most Complete Hybrids

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A thread was started earlier this month in the GolfWRX Equipment Forum titled, “Anti-hook hybrids.” The original poster, JaNelson38, asked GolfWRXers for their recommendations for a hybrid with “little if any draw bias.”

“For the life of me, I can’t stop hooking the hybrids I play,” he wrote. “It’s starting to affect me mentally, as the 3-hybrid is an important club for me when I’m playing my home course.”

More than 60 comments later, JaNelson38 had countless leads from GolfWRX Members. Suggestions ranged from trying a handful of 5-year-old hybrid models to switching to driving irons. He was even offered swing advice.

Titleist’s new 818 H1 and 818 H2 hybrids were created with golfers like JaNelson38 in mind, and they’ll likely simplify future discussions. They’re the first Titleist hybrids to feature the company’s SureFit CG Technology, an adjustable-weight system that allows golfers to shift a hybrid’s center of gravity to encourage, or discourage, a specific ball flight.

818-H1-Adjustability

The 818 hybrids are also loft and lie adjustable through Titleist’s SureFit hosel.

SureFit CG, which is also available on Titleist’s 917 drivers and fairways, uses a weighted stick to adjust CG. The stick is inserted through an opening on the side of the hybrids that runs from toe to heel and is secured with a screw. Every 818 H1 and 818 H2 hybrid is sold with two weighted sticks: one that’s evenly weighted to encourage a straight ball flight, and another that’s heavier on one end to create either a draw- or fade-biased trajectory.

Using SureFit CG, golfers can encourage a draw by positioning the heavy end of the weighted stick on the heel side of the hybrid; they can encourage a fade by positioning the heavy side of the weight on the toe side of the hybrid. The CG difference between the two settings is approximately 1.5 millimeters, which will create about 4 yards of trajectory bias, says Stephanie Luttrell, Director of Titleist Metalwood Development. The stock weight of the stick is 14 grams, but heavier and lighter weights are available to accommodate custom club lengths, shafts, and swing weights.

Gapping Recommendations From Titleist

  • 25-degree 818 hybrid replaces AP1 4-iron for R-Flex golfers
  • 23-degree 818 hybrid replaces AP1 4-iron for S-Flex golfers
  • 23-degree 818 hybrid replaces AP3 4-iron for S/X-Flex golfers
  • 21-degree 818 hybrid replaces AP3 3-iron for S/X-Flex golfers
  • 23-degree 818 hybrid replaces AP2 3-iron for S/X-flex golfers

Learn more about Titleist’s 718 irons.

When the 818 hybrids were made available to PGA Tour players in July at the Quicken Loans National, Brendon de Jonge saw the benefits of the added adjustability first hand, Luttrell says. De Jonge had developed a tendency to hit his hybrid to the left, and at the time he had abandoned the 816 H2 hybrid he was previously using. Using the fade-biased SureFit CG setting in an 818H2 hybrid allowed de Jonge was able to fix the issue. He put a 19-degree 818 H2 in his bag that week.

The 818 H2 targets the needs of better players, with a compact, squared-off appearance. It’s the most popular Titleist hybrid on the PGA Tour by a wide margin. The vast majority of amateur golfers, on the other hand, will likely prefer the company’s 818 H1 hybrid. Although it’s smaller and more streamlined than the 816H1 hybrid it replaces, it has a larger, more fairway-wood like shape than the 818 H2 to offer a higher ball flight and more forgiveness.

According to Luttrell, golfers won’t notice much of a distance increase if they’re comparing the 818 hybrids to 816 models: maybe 1-2 yards. Where they should see a difference is in the consistency of the new hybrids, which is attributable to the movement of weight lower and deeper in the club heads. That boosts moment of inertia (MOI), a measure of forgiveness, by 10 percent over past models. It also boosts launch and spin of the clubs, leading to more “playable distance.”

“We weren’t looking to make these hybrids go significantly farther,” she says. “We wanted to deliver more consistent launch and spin.”

The 818 H1 hybrids are available in five lofts (19, 21, 23, 25 and 27 degrees). The 818 H2 hybrids are available in four lofts (17, 19, 21 and 23 degrees). They’re available for testing starting September 1 and will be in stores September 29.

Stock Shaft Options

818Hybrids-Group-Environmental

  • Mitsubishi Tensei Pro Red 50 Hybrid (L)
  • Mitsubishi Tensei Pro Red 60 Hybrid (A, R, S)
  • Mitsubishi Tensei Pro Blue 70 Hybrid (R, S)
  • Mitsubishi Tensei Pro White 90 Hybrid (S, X)
  • Fujikura Atmos HB Tour Spec Blue 8 Hybrid (S, X)
  • Project X Even Flow Blue 85 Hybrid (S)

Discussion: See What GolfWRX Members Are Saying About The 818 Hybrids In Our Forum. 

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9 Comments

9 Comments

  1. Teaj

    Aug 31, 2017 at 10:44 pm

    Tough crowd, though for those that commented in the thread it seemed like the author was putting them down.

    • OR

      Sep 1, 2017 at 1:41 am

      The author is a shill … soooo obvious

      • Chipnrun

        Sep 1, 2017 at 3:30 pm

        No he’s not. Don’t say things you know nothing about.

  2. Mad-Mex

    Aug 31, 2017 at 8:31 pm

    Think I’ll stick with my adjustable K-Sig Hybrid, the CG moves 1.75mm,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, Too soon?!?!

  3. Roger McIntosh

    Aug 31, 2017 at 1:15 pm

    “A thread was started earlier this month in the GolfWRX Equipment Forum titled, “Anti-hook hybrids.” The original poster, JaNelson38, asked GolfWRXers for their recommendations for a hybrid with “little if any draw bias.”

    “For the life of me, I can’t stop hooking the hybrids I play,” he wrote. “It’s starting to affect me mentally, as the 3-hybrid is an important club for me when I’m playing my home course.”
    ————————-
    Yes, the solution to JaNelson’s problem must be in the design of the hybrid clubhead.
    Titleist to the rescue with their adjustable clubhead that will solve all of JaNelson’s swing problems and all without messing around with his swing mechanics.
    Now that’s what I call advanced 21st century golf club technology. Just dial it in, what could be easier?!

  4. golfraven

    Aug 31, 2017 at 11:20 am

    They said the same about the 816 model, which currently is my least favorite club.

    • Roger McIntosh

      Aug 31, 2017 at 1:16 pm

      Yup, adjust the clubhead, not the golfer.

    • Boss

      Sep 1, 2017 at 3:29 am

      It’s my favorite. You just don’t know how to hit it

      • golfraven

        Sep 1, 2017 at 11:22 am

        Yeah, when I hit it, it goes like a dream. Maybe I just didn’t give it enough air time so when I pull it out of the bag it does not fule me with confidence. I just need to give it more love and attention I guess.

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TaylorMade signs Matthew Wolff to a multi-year deal; Wolff WITB

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TaylorMade Golf has officially announced the signing of Matthew Wolff on a multi-year agreement that will see the 20-year-old play the company’s metal woods, irons, wedges, putter and ultimately, TaylorMade’s flagship golf ball, the TP5x.

Wolff had previously unveiled that he would be making his professional debut at this week’s Travelers Championship, and just as top prospect Collin Morikawa did earlier at this month’s Canadian Open, Wolff will do so as a TaylorMade staffer.

The NCAA All-American and 2019 NCAA Division I individual champion made his debut on the PGA Tour at the Waste Management Phoenix Open earlier this year where he finished T50 after opening his week with a round of five-under par.

Matthew Wolff WITB

Driver: TaylorMade M6 (8 degrees)
Shaft: Graphite Design TP 7TX

Fairway Wood: TaylorMade M6 (15 degrees)
Shaft: Project X HZRDUS Smoke 6.5 TX

Utility Iron: TaylorMade P760 (2)
Shaft: Nippon Modus 130x

Irons: TaylorMade P750 Tour Proto (3-PW)
Shafts: Nippon Modus 130x

Wedges: TaylorMade Milled Grind Raw (52, 56, 62 degrees)
Shaft: True Temper Dynamic Gold X100

Putter: TaylorMade Spider X Copper

 

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8 interesting putter photos from Bettinardi’s Summer Social

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Bettinardi’s annual Summer Social was held at company HQ in Tinley Park, Illinois, last week. For RJB enthusiasts from as far away as London and Japan, it’s an opportunity to get together with like-minded individuals, shoot the breeze, oh, and check out some of the coolest putters in the world.

For those of us not lucky enough to join Bob, Sam, and the 60-plus collectors in attendance, Bettinardi was kind enough to furnish us with a few photos of the one-off and limited-edition flatsticks featured at the 10th edition of the gathering.

DASS BBZero Sound Slot Wizard Ghost Face

DASS 3 Step Jam Fancy Neck Tie Dye

DASS SS38 Fancy Face

DASS BB8 Mid Sound Slot

Carbon Fred Couples Blade Fancy Neck

Raw Fred Couples Blade

DASS QB6 Mid-Slant Chitown Dog

DASS QB6 Gold Flame

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Equipment

WRX Spotlight: Argolf Mordred putter

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Product: Argolf Mordred putter

Pitch: From Argolf: “…each ARGOLF putter is named after an Arthurian legend.”

“Mordred was known as a notorious traitor who fought King Arthur at the Battle of Camlann, where he was killed, and Arthur was fatally wounded. The images depicting Mordred are reflected in the winged design of the putter which aids in stabilization and alignment, as well as its coloring.”

“With a lower center of gravity that surpasses all mallet putters in the ARGOLF collection, Mordred boasts one of the highest MOIs available on the market. Precisely milled from a solid block of aeronautical-grade 7175 Aluminum, Mordred appeals to the eye with its clean and sophisticated look. Using the most advanced technology, Mordred is shaped through a 5-axis milling process that differentiates itself from its competitors in design and performance due to its aerodynamic features.”

Our take on the Argolf Mordred putter

When you are dreaming of your next high-end milled putter, Argolf might not be the first name that pops into your head. Argolf is a French company founded in 2010 by a couple of aeronautical industrialists and a golf professional. By combining the expertise from both sites, Argolf has created a line of milled putters that not only look like art but with performance that rivals more well-known brands.

Mordred is a large mallet that boasts a very low center of gravity and super high MOI. Milled out of a solid block of aerospace-grade 7175 aluminum, the design is influenced by the aerodynamic lines from F1 race cars. The face features Argolf’s C-Claw technology that produces a more consistent forward roll without skidding. The Mordred is finished off with a single orange site line, a black PVD shaft, and a Pure midsize grip.

When you open the box, you are greeted with a nice grey and orange head cover that feels high quality and durable. Headcover removed, you will say hello to one of the larger mallet putters you have ever tried. The finish is a matte dark gray that eliminates glare and contrasts well with the orange paint fill. Traditionally high end milled putters have milling lines on most of the head and ARGOLF hid most of those in this head. The milling lines and marks are still visible on the rounded sections, but any flat surface is perfectly smooth. From what I have been told by machinists, it is more expensive to remove those lines and marks.

Any mallet putter that boasts high MOI, the style is going to be love or hate. At first, I was taken back by how busy the Mordred is, but out on the course, those flowing lines melt away. Not once was I distracted by them while lining up a putt. Size is going to take some getting used to as it just frames the ball different than any other mallet I have tried.

Feel and sound is where Mordred really shines. I have putted with aluminum putters before, and depending on the design they can have a different sound or feel. The C-Claw face really offers a softer feel and sound with just a slight click at impact. Not as crisp as carbon steel, just a little more muted and I enjoyed the sounds and feel with the Titleist AVX.

ARGOLF’s C-Claw technology does what it says and gets the ball rolling with zero skidding, even on long uphill putts. Putting side-by-side with a standard faced putter you could easily see tell the difference in the first foot of roll. Some face technologies can cause issues with distance control, but every putt rolled out to the expected distance. Compared to a traditionally milled face the Mordred will roll a fraction farther, but something that is easy to adjust to with a handful of putts on the practice green.

Shots off center go almost exactly where you aimed; the toe miss leaks just a touch right. Putts struck on the heel go straight and lose minimal distance while feeling still very solid. Toe strikes leak a hair right and are met with a small amount of vibration letting you know you missed the center of the putter.

Overall, Argolf’s Mordred putter is a great option for someone who is looking for a super forgiving putter. A minor complaint is no grip options for a putter at this price. I like a standard size, firmer grip and there are no other options to select from. The other thing that could become an issue is how well the finish holds up. I always use the headcover when I am not using my putter and the finish still has a few minor marks on it. If you are anti-headcover you might notice faster wear. Those are pretty small issues, and I think that ARGOLF has a really solid putter here.

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