Callaway Speed Regime Golf Balls: SR-1, SR-2, SR-3

If a golfer doesn’t have the swing speed of a tour pro, are they really going to get the most out of a tour-level golf ball?

According to Dave Bartels, senior director of R&D for Callaway golf balls, the answer is likely no, which is why Callaway’s new Speed Regime line of golf balls have three different constructions to suit golfers with different swing speeds.

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The SR-1 is designed to work best for golfers with driver swing speeds of 90 mph or less. Like Callaway’s premium golf balls of the past, it uses the company’s dual-core construction and a thin mantle layer that allow the balls to launch with less spin off longer clubs and more spin off shorter clubs. But the four-piece ball has a new HEX aerodynamic pattern that helps golfers achieve a higher trajectory for more carry distance.

The SR-2 will work best for golfers with driver swing speeds between 90-and-105 mph. Its HEX dimple pattern is balanced to reduce drag at the high-speed portion of a ball’s flight, such as the first third of a driver’s flight. But it also adds lift during the last third of flight, when a golf ball is traveling with less speed. The five-piece golf ball also has an additional mantle layer that helps boost ball speed and reduce spin for better performance with longer clubs.

The SR-3, which targets golfers with driver swing speeds of 105 mph or more, will be the 2014 Callaway ball of choice for the company’s tour players. Its HEX dimple pattern is designed to reduce the drag forces that rob high-speed golfers of distance and accuracy.

Like the SR-2, the SR-3 is a five-piece golf ball. The most important layer of the ball is likely its outer mantle, according to Greg Sabella, director of marketing for Callaway Golf balls, because of its impact on feel. In the past, Callaway has been criticized for the firm feel of its premium golf balls, such as the 2013 HEX Tour Black. But the SR-3’s much softer ionomer outer mantle makes it feel noticeably softer than previous models, Sabella said.

Each of the Speed Regime golf balls have a thermoplastic urethane “Duraspin” cover that is specially formulated to accommodate the three different HEX dimple patterns. They will be available in January and sell for $47.99 per dozen.

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60 COMMENTS

  1. All this talk about balls for different swing speeds is a bit confusing.Do you remember when there were 90 and 100 compression balls.,Was this not based on swing speed?To me golf sales of all kinds are all based on marketing.How many golfers have heard of or tried Miura golf products?Best product in golf without huge marketing!

  2. Have tried the SR-2 and SR-1 golf balls a little the past few days. Very good golf ball imho, except for that price. For the money the Project A ball compares very favorably to the SR-1 and SR-2, again imho. I tested the two balls on a launch monitor with a 7 iron and the distance between the 2 is very close, SR-2 might be just a tad longer, insignificant it appears. The Project A has a seam on the cover, would be nice if it was seamless, even if cost a few dollars more a dozen. They both seem pretty good around the greens, albeit my testing has been on damp greens.

  3. I was surprised at the price point for the speed regime balls … and not pleasantly.

    For the non-speed freaks, the Chrome launches high and obtains distance. Around the greens, it stops on full shots, runs a little on delicate shots around the green.

    I will try the SR1 … when I can find it at a discount.

  4. I just tried a sleeve of the SR2’s. I usually play the Chrome +, and I can say that there is a tangible difference. The SR2 feels much softer off of the irons and spins much much more around the greens. With that said, I will probably stick with the Chrome + due to price. I can not see myself spending 47.00 per dozen balls. That’s the reason I never gave the Lethals or the Pro V1’s a go. Chrome + is good enough for me and is still the best price / performance option in my opinion.

  5. Just want to help everyone out there. If you cannot afford or don’t want to pay near $50 for balls, try Callaway Chrome+. For $30, there is not a better ball out there. Distance, durability, spin, feel…it is nearly as good as the $50 selections, and maybe just as good.

  6. After reading all the comments on here about balls I’ve got to comment. Been in the business for way to many years and playing for over 50 with a plus handicap for more than the last 30. I can’t tell the difference between ANY of the 2 piece balls, they all feel like rocks. Also when playing the 2013 Titleist PRO V1X (my ball of choice since they increased the cover durability) I only use a ball for 9 holes then it goes into the shag bag. A lot of the better golfers play a ball for only 2 or 3 holes. What I have found is that the vast majority of ball choices are made by 2 different variables, the players skill levels (if you can’t break 90-100 NO ball will help or hurt)and the players wallet (lots of guys playing PRO V1’s or other pro line balls that can’t play a lick).

  7. Hex Chrome plus has been the best ball I have played over the last couple years irregardless of price point. I just hope they keep making the chrome plus or I will have to start my annual golf ball search all over.

    • irregardless?? so that’s kind of a double negative. Which in turn it negates your point… unless you mean it is without without regard

      • JCorona –
        Gary believes the Hex Chrome+ is the best ball he has played. Did you understand that? If yes, then Gary communicated with you, so move on. And if you understood, then his “double negative” did not negate his point.

    • Unfortunately, it looks like the Chrome and Chrome+ are going away with the introduction of the SR line. I was at the PGA Show a few weeks back, and the Chrome line was nowhere in sight in Callaway’s section. Moreover, if you look at all the retailers, the Chrome line is now either not on the shelves, or on sale. So, if that’s your ball of choice – now is the time to stock up!!

  8. Callaway seems to be going with the new trend of golf balls being designed for different swing speeds but the price of these are going to turn some people off undoubtedly. Callaway had a pretty good thing going with the Hex Chrome, a very good golf ball at a somewhat lower price. I doubt the SR 1 will do as well as the Hex Chrome sales wise unless it is an absolutely unbelievable ball. The Taylormade RocketBallz Urethane or similar golf balls would probably be MUCH better value over all.

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