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Phil McGleno Bashes Woods

Phil McGleno aka Phillip McClelland O’Grady aka Mac O’Grady bashed Tiger Woods stating that on a scale of ten. He went on to say that for Mr. Woods to challenge Mr. Nicklaus’s record in the majors is cheating. Like being on steroids. The steroids aren’t in the players, they’re in the equipment. Ridiculous say I.

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Oh my, Phil McGleno aka Phillip McClelland O’Grady aka Mac O’Grady is making news headlines for the first time in a while.  "When Nicklaus and Palmer played, when (Ben) Hogan played and Sam Snead played, on a scale of zero to 10, they were a nine-plus," he said. "Tiger Woods is not even a one-plus."

"The reason why (Woods) can hit it on the green is because he has square grooves," he said.

"He doesn’t have that, he’s dead. He cannot do it — it’s impossible. For him to go after Nicklaus’ records is cheating. This is like steroids."

Single word response; WOW!  How do you like that for brash off the wall nonsense? Mr. McGleno/O’Grady/ O’Grady has obviously has one too many name changes leading him to believe anyone would take him seriously.  To call Tiger Woods a complete hack exemplifies chutzpah enough to make my grandmother respond "Oy vey".  What is this guy thinking?  Oh right, he’s not.  My bad.  These three quotes are without doubt the most ridiculous things a non politician has said since my Uncle Norton volunteered to go first in a game of Russian Roulette played with a single shot weapon.

I should just leave this end here but for the sake of argument and a little filler let’s examine these statements a bit closer.  To say that Mr. Woods is not even a one plus on a scale of ten without todays equipment is equivalent to saying no golfer can compare to Tom Morris, Old and Young, because that was real golf.  The equiment allowed Nicklaus, Palmer, Player and the rest to play as well as they did; why they even used machines instead of sheep to mow the grass. That’s not golf as it was meant to be played.  Mr. McGleno/O’Grady/O’Grady is apparently of the belief that it was only his generation that could play the game properly.  My guess is he’s a closet Luddite.

Next is the statement that Mr. Woods can only hit the green because of square grooves.  Hello.  Earth to McGleno/O’Grady/O’Grady, you can’t really mean if I gave Mr. Woods a V grooved wedge he’d be unable to hit the green can you?  If this isn’t one of the most bitter statements I’ve never seen a case of "wedge envy" before.  The Eagles wrote a song about this whole thing; Get Over It.

To compare the use of modern equipment in golf to the use of steroids in other sports mimics whistling past the graveyard on a dark and stormy night, it’ll make you feel better a little bit about your own mortality.   How much have scores improved?  Are there a raft of players scoring the equivalent of hitting 70 home runs.  Is it easier to get the ball in the hole?  Did you watch the US Open by any chance and take note of the winning score? 

There’s more but you get the idea.  I’ve not read a more childish set of statements uttered in earnest.  My initial reaction was to offer Mr. McGleno/O’Grady/O’Grady some cheese and crackers to enjoy with his whine.  That was followed by my wondering what’s the motivation for these assertions? Does he hope to get his name in the papers?  Well that worked.  It also got him all over the internet because there are a lot of folks like myself .  Maybe I should throw away my 460cc headed driver, cavity back irons,  square grooved wedges, and three piece urethane covered ball because I’m overwelmed with guilt at the prospect of being a cheat and the equivalent of a drug user.  Oh the anguish.  Consternation grips my thoughts; I’m torn by the ethical dilemma the words of Mr. McGleno/O’Grady/O’Grady have created inside my tiny little brain. What to do! What to do!  HA!  The game is too much fun these days,  not easy, but fun so I do believe I shall continue on and leave the whiner to cry in the desert on his own.  I don’t believe my soul is in danger, nor do I believe the soul of the game is in any dire need of repair.  

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18 Comments

18 Comments

  1. Chantel McGleno

    Jun 5, 2008 at 10:08 pm

    WOW! I guess I’m in a lot of shock right now… Not only the bashing of Tiger Woods but I was told from some family Members that Mac O Grady is my uncle.

  2. Brian Kaplan

    Apr 11, 2008 at 1:11 am

    I would of loved to see Phil vs tiger back in the day.I was around 16 years old at a local public golf course called rancho park in los angeles, when phil as i know him as, decided to take me under his wing and teach me,without even asking for one thing back. His kindness was a 10,his physical shape would match up to tiger pound per pound easily, I know he was so healthy in regards to what he ate that even tiger could not have matched it.So yes I do believe in what phil has to say as if you did not know him and see his work ethics you have know reason to be so negative.The reason he does not have a published number, there would be to many calls.

  3. aaron

    Jul 10, 2007 at 7:33 pm

    I will only agree with O’Grady in one respect. Tiger couldn’t play with the old old timers equipment. Byron Nelson said (Golf Digest interview) that if Tiger played in his time with the hickory shafts, he’d snap every one of them.

  4. steve

    Jul 10, 2007 at 5:48 pm

    mac o grady or whatever his name is a complete idiot—you know something really bothers me about mac or phil or whatever they call him–if you you check on the top golf instructors in golf magazine or golf digest im not sure which one off-hand–they put mac o grady is ranked as one of the top instructors–with no contact info—how do you contact him for a lesson—what a complete scam—who ranks these teachers— themselves???—-as far as this enigma of “ballstriking” goes—tiger hits the ball very solid maybe hes not hogan pure but hits it solid enough—and tigers putting when hes on–awesome—and tigers iron play–awesome–wedge play–awesome—chipping–awesome–creativity and imigination–awesome—bunker play–awesome—-get the idea

  5. DB

    Jul 10, 2007 at 5:20 pm

    When it comes to the question of great champions, equipment and other factors can be thrown out the window. It is simply a matter of what makes a champion like Tiger: Mental tenacity, competitive strength, personal accountability and leadership in every aspect of life, etc. The only measuring stick we have is how Tiger compares to and competes against his peers today. Barry Bonds took steroids, but is he a champion? No. World series rings: 0. If you could manufacture the intangibles that Tiger posesses and he took them in pill or cream form, McGleno may have an argument and Nike would rule the world. But until then, go ahead and give all the other players steroids and make their grooves octagonal for all I care. I guarantee in the long run Tiger will come out on top until a better competitor comes along.

  6. Andrew

    Jul 10, 2007 at 10:50 am

    Over time, all sports evolve. Tennis- wooden rackets, sweater-vests, long pants and long skirts have become what it is today. Look at a pair of Basketball sneakers from 20-30 years ago and it’s amazing that the players could even jump.

    The point is, as long as everyone has access to the same gear, what’s the argument? Tiger Woods is TODAY’s best player, if you want to compare him historically that’s fine too but don’t knock him because he has access to technology that everyone else has.

    Conditioning also plays a huge role. Do you think Jack and Arnie were at the gym bench pressing what Tiger presses now? Look around the tour, especially the younger players and you can see how far the sport has come in terms of physical strength and physical attributes. THE SPORT HAS EVOLVED, and for the better.

    Tiger is the best player of our generation, hands down. And he has transcended the game of golf like NO OTHER. That cannot be disputed. Someone also mentioned the quality of the players throughout the field, also a great point. For the top 50-75 maybe even 100 PGA pros, the skill level is so tight, it’s so much of a mental game and how you approach each shot…Tiger just handles pressure in a way that is also un-matched. He expects to win every tournament he enters, and it’s that approach that gives him that extra something that other players seem to buckle when they encounter.

  7. Michael

    Jul 9, 2007 at 8:12 am

    Mac who?

    My mama always told me, “Consider the source” before wasting time and energy on them.

  8. john james

    Jul 9, 2007 at 1:40 am

    Normally, I don’t respond to trivial fluff like this, but Mac’s comments and these last mind-numbing observations by Justin demand it. First, O’Grady had a fabulous physical game, but mentally when the pressure was on to hit that long iron to the sloped green or sink the putt, his mind shanked. He had documented melt-downs. He was, and is, a loser. Every player today will tell you that the hardest thing to beat about Tiger is his mind-set.
    Equipment and the game evolves. Tiger’s ability has changed the courses, his physical conditioning has changed the physical shape of golfers from pot-bellied softies(go look at Jack in the ’60s) to buffed athletes. All the players during Jack and Arnie’s era played with the same equipment, just like players today have the same gear as Tiger. What you do with that equipment determines how great a player you are.
    It’s too bad Mac has fallen still lower in the golfing ranks by having to try and get some publicity by these idiotic comments.

  9. Justin

    Jul 8, 2007 at 9:53 pm

    You all need to get off the tiger band wagon. The equipment today is so much better it is almost is like cheating. Also tiger is not even close to the best ball striker whoever thinks that does not Know golf. Mac is even a better ball striker then tiger. Tiger just has an incredible short game that saves him all the time from his bad shots. Whoever wrote that article probably knows as much about golf as my sister. You probably are a weekend hacker like the rest of you out there with a 15 handicap or something.

  10. GR1NDER

    Jul 7, 2007 at 8:49 pm

    Sounds like someone needs a mental coach…. or perhaps just a psychologist!

  11. joerookie

    Jul 6, 2007 at 8:30 pm

    Arnie, Jack, Slammin Sammy, Hogan and all the others played the field using the same equiptment of the day. Tiger is doing the same, playing against the field with the equiptment of the day. Even the grass is different today compared to when Arnie, Jack and Hogan played and won their Majors. Unless you are taking drugs you can easily see that Tiger Woods is a 9+ of 10 easily. I watched O’Grady play at the Buick Open a few times, and he’s a talented individual, but he must be on crack to make comments like these.

  12. nynick99

    Jul 4, 2007 at 6:19 pm

    I’m in my 60’s and have seen every great player from the 50’s to the present. I can say without question that Tiger is the best ball striker I have ever seen. Jack is the greatest champion with 18 majors, but Tiger is the best golfer.

    In addition, when Nicklaus, Arnie, Player and Trevino went into a major, they only had to beat, at most, 15 players. The competition is so much better today that it isn’t even close.

    To show how much impact Tiger has on the tour, they never had to ‘Nicklaus-proof’ the courses as they do today. Also, when Tiger joined the tour the total prize money was about $70MM. now it is almost $300MM. Nicklaus, Arnie, etc, never had that kind if impact. Don’t get me wrong, Jack Arnie, Player and all the rest were great golfers and grew the game, but Tiger took it ito the stratosphere.

    O’Grady is just jealous of the players of today, especially Tiger.

  13. Nick

    Jul 4, 2007 at 2:52 pm

    To compare todays golfers to golfers 4 decades ago is simply not fair to either. The equipment is completely different, the main advantage being todays balls. The courses are completely different. The game in general is nowhere near the same. While I do feel that the players 30 and 40 years were overall better players and there was more competition, to say that Tiger would not have won is ridiculous. Just imagine Nickluas, Palmer, and Tiger battling for the trophy.

  14. Johnny2Putt

    Jul 3, 2007 at 10:06 pm

    Mr. McGleno/o’Grady/O’Grady,

    You might understand the golf swing, but you don’t understand golf.

  15. Champ

    Jul 3, 2007 at 11:45 am

    Does Tiger even have square grooves on his Nike blades?

  16. EnglishBob

    Jun 30, 2007 at 1:12 pm

    “O’Grady attempted to qualify for the PGA Tour through Q School 17 times before receiving his tour card, during this time he legally changed his name from Phil McGleno to Phillip McClelland O’Grady, and then to Mac O’Grady. His best finish in a major is a T-9”

    I assume Mac plays in Green.

  17. A.J.

    Jun 30, 2007 at 12:27 am

    Wait, so let me get this straight, Tiger has these grooves so he is cheating, let’s just completely disregard the fact that every other player on tour has the same exact type of stuff. In the hands of Tiger they are like steroids, in the hands of everyone else they aren’t? What a joke, Tiger is the best and probably would have been the best had he played back then.

  18. Justyn

    Jun 29, 2007 at 2:03 pm

    Interesting. The courses were shorter in the days and are now longer due to the equipment improvement. I have a feeling if Tiger were to play back in the days of Nicklaus, Hogan, etc… he would actually have more wins.

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Equipment

Callaway Opus wedges launched on PGA Tour

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Editor’s note: This is an excerpt of an article our Andrew Tursky filed for PGATour.com’s Equipment Report. Read the full piece here.

While this is the world’s first official look at the final versions of the Opus line of wedges, Callaway staffers have actually been involved In the prototyping and design process for around two years, according to Callaway Tour Manager Joe Toulon.

“The Tour launch is basically when we’re introducing it to the Tour players officially for the first time,” Toulon said on Tuesday at the 2024 Travelers Championship. “We’ve done a lot of work with this wedge in the prototyping stages. It’s a project that we’ve really kicked off 2 years ago, when we really started digging into this category and understanding what the best players in the world look for in a wedge.”

Of course, Callaway’s research and design team has been studying the wedge category for decades, but this time around – during the design of the new Opus wedges – Callaway put more power than ever into the hands of PGA TOUR players. Toulon and team paid close attention to everything Tour players wanted from a wedge, including the look at address, the shape of the leading edge, how the club sits on the ground with the face open, the shaping of the sole, the sound, the feel, and how the wedge interacts with the turf at impact under various conditions.

Although all factors were considered, the most significant barrier to entry for Tour players is their first impression of the shape of the wedge at address.

“The shape is really something we spent a lot of time with, and getting it to look good to the majority of players – it’s something that you may not hit everybody’s eye exactly right, but this is something where we got countless hours of feedback and testing from Tour players, and this is kind of the final product,” Toulon said. “…I think one of the things that players really focus on when they set a wedge down for the first time is what it looks like at address, and what it looks like when you open the face, and we did a lot around that; the shaping and the roundness of this wedge.”

Toulon calls it the “final” product, because there were various iterations of the Opus wedges before this. Actually, these final versions of the Opus wedges are based on the sixth prototype, specifically.

“[The Opus wedge] was code named ‘S6’ during the process,” Toulon said. “We stamped every wedge out here (on the PGA TOUR) in this shape with S6, and that basically just stands for some of the shaping designs we went through. That was the sixth shape design that we settled on based on what the player feedback was. That’s really the whole story behind this wedge; tour-inspired, tour-driven. These guys out here designed this wedge. This is just the final cosmetic and final design that we went with.”

Read the full piece here.

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Your 2024 U.S. Open champion is BDC

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Opening Act: The Amateurs

There’s a balance to the universe, as Shipley gets a top USGA medal

Despite their given name, Neal Shipley and Luke Clanton played like the main attraction on Sunday. That’s not to say that their games were more elite; just similar. Case in point: Clanton played the final four holes bogey-bogey-par-bogey and lost the silver medal by two shots. Shipley closed in bogey-birdie-bogey-par and won a silver medal, to go with his runner-up silver medal from the 2023 US Amateur.

For fans of the amateur race, three were fortunate to qualify for the weekend’s 36 holes at Pinehurst. Gunnar Broin was in fine position at +3 through 36 holes, but a day-three 81 took him out of the running for the no-pay honors. He did close with 72, to finish at +16 and a tie for 70th place. Shipley and Clanton, as if scripted by Hollywood, were partnered in the 12:04 game, and would not have to look beyond their own fairway, to determine how they stood.

Shipley opened with a birdie, but gave the stroke back to Old Man Par at the very next hole. A double bogey at the tricky 8th brought him to the halfway house in 37 strokes. Clanton had bogeys at four, six, and eight, but a birdie at seven kept their low-am match even as they turned for home. Clanton found a pair of birdies at 10 and 13, but a bogey at 12 kept him even with Shipley, as they headed for the closing four. No stretch of holes could be any more disconcerting than this quadrilateral. Two par threes, sandwiched around a par five that plays as a par four, concluding with a par four that climbs uphill to a massive closing surface.

After both amateurs missed the 15th green and took three to get down, they both drove the fairway of 16, and faced 210-yard approach shots. Clanton put his shot some 50 feet from the hole, while Shipley rifled an iron to five feet. The former took three to get down for bogey, while the later drained his putt for three. In that instant, a two-shot advantage was forged. On 17, Clanton found the putting surface with his tee ball and made three, while Shipley returned a shot with another bogey four. On 18, Clanton hit a miraculous recovery iron to five feet, but his attempt to jam home the birdie for the tie was awry, and he missed the subsequent (and meaningless) putt for par. Shipley’s textbook fairway-green-two putts for par at the home hole conlcuded the mission.

The Main Event: The Professionals

It’s all  endurance, as DeChambeau claims 2nd US Open

They say that there are two types of folks that watch races: ones looking for excellence, and others that hope for crashes. We should have known that the 2024 US Open at Pinehurst #2 would end with a gut-wrenching crash. All of the elements were present: super-fast greens, surface edges that fell off into disaster, and wire grass-laden waste areas where consumate luck was the determiner for back-of-ball contact. For every Francesco Molinari moment (he of the 36th-hole ace to make the cut on the number) there were myriad stories of unfortunate bounces and pulls of gravity.

My prediction of a playoff missed by one shot. My prediction of a Matsuyama victory missed by four shots. All in all, I wasn’t far off. I made those predictions while hoping, privately, for a Rory McIlroy victory. When he took a two-shot advantage at the 12th, and preserved it at the short 13th, matching Bryson DeChambeau’s birdie three, those in the know, knew that it was far from over.

Let’s back up to the beginning of the fourth round. Let’s recall that DeChambeau held a three-shot advantage after 54 holes, which those in the know, know is nothing. One wayward swing brings double and triple bogey into the realm of the possible, and that trio of shots goes away in a gust. When DeChambeau made bogey at the fourth, his first of the day, a friend texted Bryson is imploding! True, there was much hyperbole around the place, but those in the know, knew that bogey at the long fourth was not nearly as large a speed bump as bogey at the par-five fifth, which Rory made.

Bryson DeChambeau’s front nine was a boring affair. Apart from that solitary bogey, he had nothing but par on the card. For those … all right, no more “in the know.” Eight pars is a sign of strength in the US Open. Even when McIlroy laced an iron fifteen feet above the hole, then drained the putt for two, DeChambeau didn’t flinch. Even when McIlroy added three birdies over the next four holes, DeChambeau didn’t flinch. Recall, please, that DeChambeau followed a 52nd-hole double bogey with a 53rd-hole birdie on Saturday. All who love Rory, know that controlling his emotions and preserving balance, is elusive. For DeChambeau, it was his greatest strength. They wrote and said that Ludvig Aberg had the cool of a gunslinger, but he finished 73-73 for a 12th place tie.

It was as if the denouement of the Amateur race turned into an eerie, Groundhog’s Day-effect. Over the closing four holes, McIlroy made three bogeys, while DeChambeau closed in plus-one. McIlroy’s two-shot advantage evaporated, thanks to missed putts of four and two-point-five feet on the 18th and 16th greens.

Worst of all was the iron that he played into 15. It was reminiscent of Tom Watson’s approach to the 72nd hole at Royal Troon in 2009. Needing only to put the ball on the front of the green to guarantee par and a major title at age 59, Watson momentarily forgot about adrenaline, and bounded over the green for bogey. This year, it was McIlroy’s turn. His tee shot landed in the middle of the rock-hard putting surface, and bounced, then rolled, over the target and up against a toupee of wire grass.

Thus spake Zarathustra, and thus did fate annoint Bryson DeChambeau the 2024 US Open champion. The big man from Texafornia did everything he could to give the tournament to McIlroy, but his grit and his guile would not allow that result. Few would ever have called the brawny Bryson the consumate US Open player but, in joining Brooks Koepka as the only golfer since Tiger Woods to win two of them, that might be his legacy.

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5 Things We Learned: Saturday at the U.S. Open

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If you weren’t on the edge of your seat as Saturday afternoon’s play thread unraveled, you were certainly having a good nap. Golf at Pinehurst was riveting, as birdies and double bogeys faced off in a breathaking dance. Competitors suddenly rose to heights, then fell just as quickly away to the depths. The leader through three rounds stands at seven-under par, with seven other conestants at minus-one or better. For the first time all week, the lead involves just one golfer, and there is a three-shot gap until the next players. It’s uncharted territory for the 124th US Open, and it merits a bit of investigation and explanation, along with a dash of anticipation. Five bits of information tie the third round in a splendid bow, and I’ll share those five things we learned with you, right now.

1. Holes 1 and 2 are not to be assumed

Thomas Detry’s hard work went away in the space of 35 minutes. He opened with bogey and followed with double, at Saturday’s first two holes. Pinehurst #2 can still be managed, but it’s a lot harder when you’re already three over par on the day. Neither the first nor the second is particularly daunting from a distance perspective. One plays slightly downward, and two is even more downhill, but the challenges around the green are regrettable, when not properly planned. Detry made five from the middle of the first fairway, thanks to three putts from the front of the putting surface. He followed with six at the second, victimized first by the piney sands along the fairway, then by the bunker that guards the right edge of the green. Detry fell away to two-over par after his 76, and will wonder how the formerly-benign opening sharpened its claws so quickly.

Solid Quote: Yeah, didn’t really get off to a great start. 3-putted the first. We (Detry and Caddy) kind of misjudged the yardage on the 2nd, which left us in a horrible spot. So double there.

Honestly, couldn’t have been a worse start because I didn’t really miss a shot, to be honest. We kind of misjudged the yardage. Laid up in the bunker. Kind of game over. 3-over after three, not good.

But I kind of regrouped nicely after that. The greens are a little bit bumpy, moving a little bit more. I shaved a couple of edges. Felt like I was a little bit unlucky on the greens. I’m looking forward for some redemption tomorrow.

2. Hole number three, while early, can be pivotal

The USGA was content to push the tees up a bit on the short, third hole on Saturday. It paid off, as players went after the green with their tee shots. Eagles were sparingly made, and birdies came more often than on previous days. If a player stands even or a bit under par after the opening pair, then finds birdie or eagle at three on Sunday, heartbeats will quicken and the game will be truly afoot. They’ll need to follow the leads of Neal Shipley and Cory Conners, both of whom found the putting surface in one on Saturday.

Solid Quote: Out here you can’t play defensive golf. If you (Morikawa) play defensive golf, it goes offline a little bit more, you’re 35 yards away from the pin.

3. Make your move in the round’s middle

Bryson DeChambeau picked up four shots on the card on Saturday, from holes five through eleven. The strong man from Texafornia (grew up in California, then played college golf in Texas) saved strokes at five and seven, then packed consecutive birdies at ten and eleven. The middle holes at the Deuce aren’t necessarily soft. They are attractive to scoring, especially when you’ve found a way to survive the first quartet. You gain momentum at the fourth, with the massively-downhill drive, then build opportunity with a well-planned fifth, the first par five of the day. The long holes are finished at the tenth green, but holes eleven through fourteen offer the chance to save a few more shots, before the long trek home.

Solid Quote: … on 13 I (DeChambeau) was going for the flag knowing the wind was off the right. It it went over to the left, totally fine. But I pushed it just a little bit and drew it back perfectly at the flag on 13. I knew that was in the realm of possibilities. Got a little lucky there.

Then 14 I was trying to hit it more toward Ludvig’s ball. I hit a great shot, just didn’t start out with any draw spin and the wind pushed it right towards the flag.

That’s kind of what you’re doing out here, is you’re trying to play conservative golf that gives you the opportunity to hit it close in some scenarios. That’s the best way I can describe it.

4. Hold on through the finish

Pinehurst’s number two course closes with two par threes, a par four that was built to be a par five, and an unforgettable finisher that conjures up images of fist pumps and sighs of relief. It’s hard to build a rhythm when you hit iron-drive-iron-driver over the closing quartet.

Solid quote: You (Pavon) feel like sometimes you are flying a little bit, your game, everything is going on, and then at some point you just miss one green, can see a bogey, and then all of a sudden it starts to be harder in your mind and in your game, and you still have to finish the round.

5. How do we sort this out?

With a three-shot advantage, the joystick is in DeChambeau’s hand. He forces everyone to shoot 67 or better, if he posts 70. His pairing in the final game with Matthieu Pavon is not ideal. The Frenchman has the potential to play a solid round, but his inexperience with the klieg lights of a major championship, fourth round, final pairing could lead to a high number. Does this faltering then distract DeChambeau? Perhaps. I believe that will happen, and he will post 72 on the day, finishing at minus five.

That wee wobble opens the door for the penultimate pairing. Cantlay and McIlroy will feel like the final day at a Ryder Cup, perhaps even a rehearsal for 2025 and Bethpage Black. They will be uber-focused on beating each other. The expectation will be that no other leader is better suited to handle Sunday’s pressure. Win the battle and you win the war. One of the two of them will post 68, and will reach a playoff at minus six.

The other playoff participant will come from a bit farther back. Either Hideki or Ludvig will inscribe 66 on his card on day the fourth, and will join battle for another two holes. We haven’t had a US Open playoff since Tiger Woods defeated Rocco Mediate in 2008, which means that we’ve never experienced a two-hole, aggregate score resolution.

We’ll have one on Sunday, plus one more hole. If contestants are tied after the aggregate, they move to sudden victory on the third playoff hole and beyond. After the two golfers match scores on one and eighteen, the 2024 US Open will be decided on the second playing of the first hole, and the winner will be the first male Japanese golfer to claim a USGA Open title: Hideki Matsuyama. For him, it will be fun.

Solid Quote: Yeah, I (Matsuyama) think I would be able to enjoy tomorrow if I can adjust my shot and putt well. It will be something fun tomorrow.

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