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WOTW: Rory McIlroy’s Green Omega Seamaster Diver 300M Co-Axial Chronometer

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Rory McIlroy just became the first player to ever win three FedEx Cup Championships. He shot a final-round 66 at East Lake Golf Club for a one-stroke win over Sungjae Im. Rory’s huge smiles might have been just as bright as the FedEx Cup trophy he held up in the Atlanta sun. On his wrist was his trusty Omega Seamaster Diver 300M that he has been wearing so often now.

WOTW Specs

Name: Omega Seamaster Diver 300M Co-Axial Master Chronometer
Reference: 210.32.42.20.10.001
Limited: No
Date: 2022
Case: Stainless Steel
Bezel: Green Ceramic
Dial: Green Ceramic
Size: 42mm
Movement: Calibre 8800, 35 Jewels
Power Reserve: 55 Hours
Glass: Saphire Crystal
Waterproof: 300 Meters
Bracelet: Green Rubber Strap
Price: $5,100 (~$5,500)

Omega has been making watches since 1848 when Louis Brandt opened the doors. You have probably seen the Omega logo and name all over the sporting world, especially during the Olympics. Omega has been the official timing partner of the Olympics for years. Rory joined the Omega team in 2013 and has been seen wearing many different Omega pieces in that time. Rory even had a solid gold signature Speedmaster back in 2019.

Omega has two iconic names when it comes to watches in the Seamaster and Speedmaster. Both watch lines have been around for decades, and the Seamaster takes its style and capability from the dive world. Rory’s green Seamaster looks to be a short run from earlier in the year since it is no longer available on Omega’s website. The case is the same 42mm stainless steel version as the normal Seamaster Diver. The caseback is stainless steel and contains a sapphire crystal display window to view the mechanic movement. On the right side of the case is the traditional screw-down crown and on the upper left side is the helium escape valve. For dives to extreme depths, gasses can build up in a watch and pop the crystal out of place or do other damage to the watch.

At the heart of the Seamaster is Omega’s Calibre 8800 self-winding, automatic movement featuring Omega’s Co-Axial escapement. The escapement in a watch movement is one of the most important parts and the Co-Axial design helps bring more precision throughout the life of the movement. The 8800 is also very resistant to magnetic fields that can influence the accuracy of the movement. The 55 hour power reserve should be more than enough for most wearers.

The green dial is made from ceramic, matching the ceramic insert on the bezel. The unidirectional ceramic bezel features a diving scale that is finished in white enamel. The hour marker is larger and filled with a luminescent material for a bright glow in low light. The date window sits at 6 o’clock and the whole dial is covered with a scratch resistant sapphire crystal. Holding the Diver 300M on wrist is a rubber strap in matching green. The strap comes together with stainless steel pin buckle for easy adjustment over a wetsuit.

This special Seamaster doesn’t show that it is available on Omega’s website any longer, so getting one might take a little bit of searching. The retail price was $5,100 and currently you can get one on the secondary for around $5,500. The secondary market price has dropped a good amount as it would have cost you around $8,000 to get one when Rory won the RBC Canadian Open back in June.

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I have been an employee at GolfWRX since 2016. In that time I have been helping create content on GolfWRX Radio, GolfWRX YouTube, as well as writing for the front page. Self-proclaimed gear junkie who loves all sorts of golf equipment as well as building golf clubs!

1 Comment

1 Comment

  1. Mcdouchellroy

    Aug 29, 2022 at 12:04 pm

    What a punk.

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The Wedge Guy: A defense of blades

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One of the longest-running and most active conversations in all of golf equipment is the subject of blades versus game improvement irons. Over the nearly 20 years I’ve been writing this blog as “The Wedge Guy,” I’ve addressed this in various ways and always stimulated a lively discussion with my readers.

I hope this angle on the conversation will do the same, so all of you please share your thoughts and observations.
In the interest of full disclosure, I have always played some kind of blade-style irons, with only a few detours along the way. But I always come back to my blades, so let me explain why.

I grew up in the 1950s and 60s when blades were all we had. As a teenager with a developing skill set, I became a devotee to those models from the old Ben Hogan Company, and played the “Bounce Sole” model, then several iterations of the Apex line after it was introduced. Those few sets served me well into my 30s, when I became involved in the golf equipment industry. Having Joe Powell Golf as a client, I switched to his pure muscle back model called the “PGI.” They were certainly sweet.

In the late 1980s, I was handling the marketing for Merit Golf, who offered a cavity back forging called the Fusion, which was inspired by the Ben Hogan Edge irons, but offered a more traditional face profile. So, I switched to them.
Playing to a low single digit handicap at the time, I really didn’t see my scores change, but I just wasn’t making as many birdies as I had before. Openly pondering why my golf felt different, a regular golf buddy noted, “You’re not knocking down pins as often as you used to,” and I realized he was right. I was hitting just as many greens as before, maybe one or two more, but I wasn’t getting those kick-in birdies nearly as often. So, I went to the closet and broke out the old Joe Powell PGI irons and had an epic day with three birdies inside five feet and a couple more in the 5-10 range.
Those blades stayed in the bag until I developed my first iron design, the “RL blades” by my first company, Reid Lockhart. By this time, I had seen enough robotic testing prove that the most penalizing mishit with a blade was a toe impact, which mirrored my own experience. So, I sculpted a pure muscle back blade, but added a bit of mass toward the toe to compensate for that deficiency of all such designs.

I played those irons for 20 years, until I created the “FT. WORTH 15” irons for the re-launch of the Ben Hogan brand in 2015. In that design, I further evolved my work to very slightly add a bit of modified perimeter weighting to a pure forged blade, taking inspiration from many of Mr. Hogan’s earlier personal designs in the Apex line of the “old” Ben Hogan Company. Those are still in my bag, going on eight years now.

So, why do I think I can make a solid defense for playing blade irons? Because of their pinpoint distance control, particularly in the short irons — those with lofts of 35 degrees or higher.

I’ll certainly acknowledge that some modern perimeter weighting is very helpful in the lower lofts . . .the mid- and long irons. In those clubs, somewhere on or near the green is totally acceptable, whether you are playing to break 90 or trying to win on the PGA Tour. [Did you know those guys are actually over par as a group outside 9-iron range?] That’s why you see an increasing number of them playing a conservative game-improvement design in those lofts. But also remember that we in the golf club design business deal with poor “hits” only . . . we have no control over the quality of your swing, so the vast majority of bad golf shots are far beyond our influence.

But what I’ve seen in repeated robotic testing and in my own play, when you get to the prime scoring clubs – short irons and wedges – having a solid thickness of mass directly behind the impact point on the face consistently delivers better distance control and spin. In my own designs of the SCOR wedges in 2010, and the Ben Hogan FT.WORTH 15 irons and TK15 wedges, I created a distribution of mass that actually placed a bit more face thickness behind the slight mishit than even in the center, and the distance consistency was remarkable.

I’ve carried that thinking to the Edison Forged wedges by positioning much more mass behind the high face and toe miss than any other wedges on the market. And in robotic testing, they deliver better transfer of energy on those mishits than any other wedge we tested.

So, back to that experience when I switched back to my Joe Powell blades from the Merit cavity back forging, I can sum it up this way.

If your pleasure from your golf is derived more from how good your worst shots turn out, then a game improvement iron is probably the way to go. But if your golf pleasure is more about how good your best shots are, I think there is a very strong case to be made for playing some kind of blade iron design, at least in your scoring clubs.

Alright, fans: sound off!

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Photos from the 2022 Presidents Cup

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GolfWRX was live for the “United States vs. Everyone (except Europe)” showdown, otherwise known as the Presidents Cup.

Contested this year at Quail Hollow Club in Charlotte, North Carolina, from an equipment standpoint, the Presidents Cup offers the opportunity to get an up-close look at the wares of the best golfers in the world and always provides for some interesting custom equipment — like Justin Thomas’ wedge, below (and Max Homa’s in the featured image).

Check out all our galleries from the Presidents Cup, below.

General Albums

WITB Albums

Pullout Album

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Photos from the 2022 Fortinet Championship

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GolfWRX is live this week at the Fortinet Championship as the 2022-2023 PGA Tour season gets underway in Napa.

Plenty of general galleries to fill your cup with this week, as well as WITB looks — including Jimmy Walker and Rickie Fowler. We also have a limited-edition Odyssey putter cover and new drivers from Wilson and Srixon.

Check out Rickie discussing his new irons in this PGA Tour x GolfWRX video.

 

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Also featured this week: An in-hand look at Greyson Sigg’s Mizuno JPX923 Tour irons (the long-rumored and already widely discussed successor to 2020’s 921).

Check out links to all our galleries after the photo of Hideki Matsuyama doing Hideki Matsuyama things, below.

General Albums

WITB Albums

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