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2 of Augusta’s most famous holes have undergone significant changes ahead of 2022 Masters

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Golf courses often have just one or two very memorable holes and, for even the most serious golf student, recalling all 18 would be a feat.

Yet if there is a set of holes that the majority could run through from memory, they have to be the 18 at Augusta National, home of the revered Masters.

Augusta has adapted over the years, including a swapping of the two ‘nines’ way before our time, and lately, an amendment to the par-4 5th hole in 2019. For 2022, they’ve gone in again.

Authorities released their annual media guide on Wednesday, revealing changes to both the par-4 11th and par-5 15th holes, whilst there have been minor amendments made to the iconic 18th.

Described as “significant hole changes” the 11th now has, “Masters tees moved back 15 yards and to the golfer’s left. Fairway recontoured and several trees removed on the right side.” As for the 15th, the guide states, “Masters tees moved back 20 yards and fairway recontoured.”

The last hole has had, “Thirteen yards added to the back of the Masters tees without necessitating a change in length to the hole.”

”The par 72 will play to 7,510 yards total, reflecting the combined 35-yard increase on Nos. 11 and 15.

Eureka Earth had previously shown work taking place on the par-5 13th, but the guide omits mention of changes to one of the most memorable holes in golf.

With one eye looking at the increased length achieved by the current crop of players, the extra 20 yards at the 15th may well dissuade too many players from ‘having a go’ and risking the long second over Rae’s Creek, but the hole ranked 15th hardest at the 2021 Masters with three eagles and the lay-up should still leave a fairly simple third.

As for the 11th, ‘White Dogwood’ ranked the hardest hole at last year’s championship and second at Dustin Johnson’s much easier to play ‘Autumn’ Masters, so the shift to a longer second shot should certainly see the hole give up the minimum amount of birdies, as when offering just three during Hideki Matsuyama’s tournament.

With all that is going on in the golf world right now, the start of the build-up to the 86th Masters in April takes on an even greater significance in the calendar.

At GolfWRX, we simply can’t wait!

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  1. Pingback: The best bets to win the 2023 Masters – GolfWRX

  2. Pingback: Nick Faldo makes bold Tiger call and aims cheeky dig at Rickie Fowler during ESPN appearance – GolfWRX – MidHandicap.com

  3. Henry R Fitzgerald

    Feb 22, 2022 at 9:39 pm

    Did they steal more property from the citizens of Augusta?

    The Masters indeed!

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Tour Photo Galleries

Photos from the 2024 Memorial Tournament

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GolfWRX is live this week from Jack’s place, Muirfield Village Golf Club, for the 2024 edition of the Memorial Tournament.

On the equipment front so far, Titleist’s new GT drivers and fairway woods have been the stars of the show. WITBs and other pull-out galleries — including a 60-degree Vokey with a K-Star grind and some interesting putters — are on display.

Check back throughout the week as we add more photos from Dublin, Ohio!

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Pullout Albums

See what GolfWRXers are saying and join the discussion in the forums.

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Morning 9: Saso wins U.S. Open | Bobby Mac victorious in Canada | Hull’s eventful week

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By Ben Alberstadt with Gianni Magliocco.

For comments: [email protected]

Good Monday morning, golf fans, as Bobby Mac and Yuka Saso celebrate their respective victories from Sunday evening.

1. Saso, 22, wins 2nd U.S. Open

Golf Channel’s Mercer Baggs…”Yuka Saso overcame an early four-putt with brilliant shot-making and a back-nine 32 to win the U.S. Women’s Open.”

  • “Saso now has two career LPGA titles: both at this major. Having won at The Olympic Club in 2021, she added Lancaster Country Club to her grand list of conquered courses.”
  • “She’s the youngest player, at 22, to win two U.S. Women’s Open championships. She also joins Seri Pak and In Gee Chun, who won at Lancaster in 2015, as the only women to make majors their first two tour victories.”
  • “Saso closed in 2-under 68 to finish at 4 under, three shots clear of former AIG Women’s Open winner Hinako Shibuno (72). Ally Ewing, who matched the day’s best with a 66, and Andrea Lee, who finished with a frustrating 75, tied for third at even par.”
Full piece.

2 Bobby Mac!

Todd Kelly for Golfweek…”The Scottish lefty, seeking his first victory on the PGA Tour, added his dad, Dougie, at the last minute as his caddie this week and the father/son duo proved to be a solid combo, as MacIntyre finished off his week north of the border by winning the 2024 RBC Canadian Open by one stroke over France’s Victor Perez.”

  • “Bobby Mac opened his week with a 64 and after back-to-back 66s, he held a four-shot lead after 54 holes, the fifth golfer to hold such a lead on the PGA Tour this season.”
  • “Canadian Mackenzie Hughes managed to grab a share of the lead on the front nine Sunday but MacIntyre zoomed back up by four at the turn and went on to a final-round 68 to finish 16 under to become the fifth player from Scotland to win on the PGA Tour since 1940. He joined fellow countrymen Sandy Lyle, Paul Lawrie, Martin Laird and Russell Knox.”
Full piece.

3. Charley’s eventful week

Kent Paisley for Golf Digest…”However, all of Hull’s professional accomplishments took a backseat to the attention she received for a seemingly innocuous moment at this week’s U.S. Women’s Open. A photo of the No. 8 player in the world signing an autograph at Lancaster Country Club while casually smoking went viral, drawing more eyeballs than most of her golfing career.”

  • “Just one cigarette, it lit up,” Hull joked
  • “Hull’s moment in the spotlight drew fans to her throughout the championship. Many shouted her name throughout the event, while one was bold enough to try and ask her out to dinner, going with the tried trope of “you dropped something” to hand Hull his number. Hull didn’t text him.”
Full piece.

4. Fill-in caddie

Kevin Prise for PGATour.com…”Paul Emerson doesn’t fancy himself a good golfer, but he’s a scratch “golf nut.” He attended Sunday’s final round as the RBC Canadian Open as a spectator, with an unexpected inside-the-ropes experience early in the day – two holes as a caddie.”

  • “Emerson, who hails from nearby Aurora, Ontario, was traversing the par-4 third hole at Hamilton Golf & Country Club when he realized that C.T. Pan’s caddie, Mike “Fluff” Cowan, had been injured and was unable to continue caddying. Pan’s playing partner Shane Lowry was carrying his own bag, and Lowry’s caddie Darren Reynolds was carrying Pan’s bag.”
  • “As Pan was walking Cowan over to a medic on the side of the fairway, Emerson asked Pan if he could lend a hand.”
Full piece.

5. Els wins on PGA Tour Champions

AP report…” Ernie Els won the Principal Charity Classic on Sunday for his fourth career PGA Tour Champions victory, closing with a 7-under 65 at Wakonda Club to beat defending champion Stephen Ames by two strokes.

  • “Tied with Rod Pampling for the second-round lead, Els eagled the par-5 15th and had five birdies in his bogey-free final round. The 54-year-old Hall of Famer from South Africa finished at 21-under 195 for his first victory since March 2023.”
  • “It’s very special,” Els said. “You know, I haven’t won for a while. I’ve had quite a few chances, but it gets tougher when you don’t get it over the line. So today was very, very competitive. A lot of players, a lot of great players. I just took my chance when it came.”
Full piece.

6. Winning WITB: Robert MacIntyre

Presented by 2nd Swing

Driver: Titleist TSR2 (9 degrees, D4 SureFit setting)

Shaft: Graphite Design Tour AD DI 7 X

3-wood: Cobra Aerojet LS (14.5 degrees)

Shaft: Graphite Design Tour AD DI 8 X

Hybrid: TaylorMade Stealth 2 Rescue (19 degrees)

Shaft: Graphite Design Tour AD DI 105 X

Irons: Titleist 620 CB (4-9)

Shafts: True Temper Dynamic Gold Tour Issue X100

Wedges: Titleist Vokey Design SM10 (46-10F), SM9 (50-08F, 56-10S), WedgeWorks (60-08K)

Shafts: True Temper Dynamic Gold X100 Onyx (46, 50), Dynamic Gold S400 Onyx (56, 60)

Putter: TaylorMade Spider Tour

Grip: SuperStroke Zenergy Pistol

Ball: Titleist Pro V1

Grips: Golf Pride Z-Grip Cord (woods), Grip Master (irons)

Full WITB.
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5 things we learned: Saturday at the U.S. Women’s Open

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Five golfers reside under par, after 54 holes at the 2024 US Women’s Open. The champion will be one of those five golfers. Their names, in order, are Minjee Lee, Andrew Lee, Wichanee Meechai, Hinako Shibuno, and Yuka Saso. In a departure from #5Things tradition, we’ll address each of the five, on what she did on Saturday and what we expect that she will do on Sunday. It’s a fun exercise, and it may gain some traction, but that’s for down the road. For now, let’s take a look at five golfers we think will figure in Sunday’s outcome.

1. Minjee Lee

The most debillitating facet of being in a three-way tie for the lead, and being the highest-ranked golf among the trio, is what I just typed. They and we and you and I expect that Minjee should continue to play well and earn a second US Open chalice. The problem is this: Minjee has improved each day: from 70 to 69 to 66. I’ll say this~if she posts 65 or better on Sunday, she wins by a half-dozen shots. No one will come close to 10-under par.

What Lee has done best, is shrink her bogey tally with each played round. From five on Thursday, to three on Friday, to one on Saturday. Again, if she continues to improve in that category, and plays a bogey-free round on Sunday, she again wins by six or more. It’s more likely that she will find herself in a dogfight with a game adversary. Does she have the grit to see her way out of that maelstorm? We’ll find out on Sunday.

2. Andrea Lee

The kid from California played in the final pairing on Saturday, and survived. Andrea had a turbulent front side, with three birdies and two pars. She settled the oars on the inward half, never sniffing a bogey. Her 67 moved her from solo 2nd to a tie for first. She’ll again tee off in group the last, albeit with a different playing partner.

Andrea Lee will have to outplay Minjee Lee, her fellow competitor in the final twosome, as well as the other three golfers with a chance at the title. A few years have passed since she won her only LPGA title, and the physical memory of how to win, is always at risk of fading over time. Andrea Lee has the opportunity to become the golfer that she worked to be, to replace the “prodigy” label with one that reads “champion.” The recipe for just how to effect that switch is a closely-guarded one. Will she sniff it out on Sunday?

3. Wichanee Meechai

Not 100% certain how this kid is still around. In the back of my mind, Moving Day would most likely have been Moving-Out Day, but Meechai is still around. Day three was a boring round of golf, with three birdies and two bogeys, alongside 13 scores of par. News flash: boring golf wins US Open cups.

Wichanee will play in the penultimate pairing on Sunday, and she will do so alongside Hinako Shibuno. She won’t have the pressure of teeing off in the last game, even though she sits tied with those who shall. We’ve been bemused and amazed all week with the tenacity of the Thai golfers, so why shouldn’t she find one more round in the 60s on Sunday, and bring home the biggest prize of her life? On the PGA Tour, it’s the PGA Championship that identifies the unexpected; on the LPGA, it’s often the US Open. Sunday might be another one of those resolutions.

4. Hinako Shibuno

Shibuno is in the least-desirable position of the top five. She posted the low round of the tournament on Saturday. Her torrid 66 consisted of seven birdies and three bogeys. If this were any other year and course, we would have higher hopes for her chances on Sunday. This is 2024 and Lancaster, and no one escapes without two or three bogeys on the card. That’s the problem for Shibuno. She is two shots behind the leading triumvirate, and odds are that one of them will post one or two-under par on Sunday. That would compel the Japanese champion to record, at most, another 66 to have a shot at a major title. Will Lancaster give up a 66 on Sunday? I do not think so.

5. Yuka Saso

They say that, statistically, Yuka Saso is holing more putts than anyone else in the field this week. Well, putting, err, puting the ball in the hole with efficiency is the essence of victory in golf, so … it makes sense that Saso still has a shot. She has posted 68-71-69, so she is due for “that” round, it seems. If she’s going to find one at Lancaster, it will be on Sunday. I’ll be brazen with my prediction on this one: first or outside the top ten. She’ll either putt the eyes out of the hole on day four, or her run with the flattest stick will come to an end.

My guesses: fow low amateur, it’s Adela Cernousek. She proves that Friday was an aberration, shoots 69, and defeats Catherine Park by one for the silver medal. For Open champion, it’s Hinako Shibuno. The run of three missed cuts in this event has already come to an end. Shibuno seals it in the most dramatic fashion, with a victory.

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