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The 19th Hole Episode 158: O Canada! Brooke Henderson is back!

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Host Michael Williams talks with Brooke Henderson about getting back to winning and her support of junior golf with SKECHERS. Also features Jeff Simonds of Bandon Dunes and Andy Johnston of Sentosa GC (Singapore)

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Golf's Perfect Imperfections

Golf’s Perfect Imperfections: World Long Drive! Go Mu!

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In this week’s podcast we discuss Wisdom In Golf Premium, new ways to help and fun talk about rules and etiquette.

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Equipment

Rickie Fowler and Hideki Matsuyama make big gear changes in Napa

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Andrew Tursky was on site at the Fortinet Championship this week and got all he could handle in terms of new equipment news. There were new irons, drivers, and even headcovers all over the range, so we had to dig into two of the biggest stories out there on this week’s Two Guys Talking Golf Podcast (give us a follow on Instagram: @tg2wrx).

Rickie Fowler’s new irons

Rickie Fowler has been changing a lot of equipment in his bag as he has struggled to get his golf game back into shape. We have seen him with different drivers, shafts, irons, and putters throughout the 2021-2022 season. Fowler has typically played some form of blade during his career, and Cobra even made him some signature Rev33 blades that were beautiful, but razor thin and intimidating for us mortal golfers.

Rickie showed up to the Fortinet with some brand new, unreleased, Cobra King Tour irons. The King Tour irons look a lot like the current Cobra King Tour MIM irons, and we can only assume that the new Tour will replace the MIM.

The interesting thing about the King Tour irons is that they look a little larger than his preferred blades and that they might have a little more ball speed and distance built into them. From the images you can tell there is a little slot behind the face that might be filled with some type of polymer.

Rickie didn’t get into the tech of the new King Tour irons but did tell Tursky that he was gaining around 3-4 yards on shots that he stuck low on the face. He finished the first round of the Fortinet Championship in the top four, so the new irons have seen some success under pressure. I know many of us hope to see Rickie back to form soon, and maybe these new King Tour irons can be the catalyst.

Hideki Matsuyama’s driver change

The other big story comes from a former Masters Champion testing out some new drivers on the range, Hideki Matsuyama. Matsuyama is well known as a golfer who loves to test and tinker with new golf equipment. Each week there is a good chance that he will have multiple drivers, irons, and fairways in the bag searching for the perfect club that week.

Earlier this week, Hideki was spotted with some new, unreleased, Srixon drivers out on the range in Napa. We spotted a few pros testing the new Srixon ZX7 MkII and ZX 5 MkII LS on the range.

Andrew spoke to the Srixon reps and learned Hideki has been trying the new drivers and seems to have settled on a Srixon ZX5 MkII in 10.5 degrees of loft (and his trusty Graphite Design Tour AD DI 8 TX shaft).

The ZX5 MkII LS looks to have an adjustable weight on the sole that is moved far forward —closer to the face — to possibly lower the spin. We haven’t heard anything specific from Srixon on the new drivers, but with their recent success, we would expect to see some solid performance out of the line.

Check out the full TG2 podcast, below

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Club Junkie

PXG M16 putter shaft: On-course review

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Exotic putter shafts are becoming a big thing and we have seen many models over the past couple of years. PXG is the latest to stuff a whole lot of technology and engineering into a putter shaft with its M16 shaft.

The M16 putter shaft is made up of a steel tip and a carbon fiber handle section that are bonded together to make a shaft that is 26-percent stiffer than a traditional steel putter shaft. The carbon handle section is made up of layers of carbon fiber, rubber, and 22 metal wires that run vertically through the shaft. This high-tech recipe creates a shaft that is stiffer and more stable than a traditional steel putter shaft. The shaft also comes in at a little lower price point than other offerings on the market at just an $89 upcharge when ordering a PXG putter.

I have played a handful of these new putter shafts, so I was excited to try this new offering from PXG. First off I love the look of the M16 with 3/4 of the shaft a matte black, it blends well with the black putter heads and grips. I have been playing the PXG Bat Attack putter this year with a traditional steel putter shaft and enjoy the stability of the putter and how the “wings” frame the ball. When I was fit for the putter PXG raised the weight of the head to help with the feel since I play the putter short, at 33 inches. PXG was kind enough to send me another Bat Attack in the same spec as my current putter, but with the new M16 shaft, so it was very easy to see how the new M16 performed.

Before heading out to the course, like all golfers, we do the waggle test, and just from that you can tell the M16 is stiffer than a traditional steel putter shaft. Out on the green the first thing I noticed, with the first putt, was the softer feel at impact. The PXG putters are fairly soft feeling anyway with their pyramid face pattern, but the M16 seems to soften that up just a little bit.

Impact brings your hands less vibration and a more solid feel as well as a more muted sound. I noticed the more muted sound with the M16 in my basement, putting on my mat. Outdoors you can still hear the difference between the two shafts and the sound is just a little more crisp, or high-pitched, with the steel shaft.

I said this before, but I am a big fan of a stiffer putter shaft and like the feel of the putter head not moving throughout the stroke. The M16 delivers on its promise of a stiffer profile and the putter head does not move during the stroke. For some players with quicker tempo putting strokes, the stiffer profile will more than likely give them a little feeling of added control.

On short putts the M16 feels stable and that the head is always aimed at your target line. There is zero movement or unwanted rotation from the head and you have the confidence to roll putts with a slightly more aggressive nature.

Lag putting I think is where the M16 really shines. The harder the stroke the more you can feel the M16 keep the putter head with your hands. The putter head just does not release as your bing the head to the bottom of the stroke to impact. Even with putts across greens and uphill you feel like you are in complete control of the putter and the ball leaves on your intended line.

Overall PXG’s M16 putter shaft is a great option at a good price to add some stability and feel to your putter. If you are looking to try an exotic putter shaft and don’t want to break the bank, then I think you have to give the M16 a good look.

More on the M16 putter shaft and new Titleist TSR2 woods in the latest episode of Club Junkie, below. 

 

 

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