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Best driver 2021: By club fitters for you!

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Your driver is one of the most important clubs in your bag. At GolfWRX, to determine the 2021 best driver, we have compiled an expert panel of fitters to help you find out which of the 2021 drivers is best for your game.

In 2021, OEMs have continued to impress us with their ability to utilize new technology and manufacturing methods to create drivers that offer forgiveness and faster more consistent club faces, along with better adjustability and fitting options. These fitting options are key elements because with more drivers being offered, it’s now easier than ever to find the right one for you.

That being said, ultimately the best way to find your personal best golf driver is to work with a professional fitter using a launch monitor. The difficult part is a lot of people don’t have easy access to fitters, launch monitors, and club builders—so at GolfWRX, we have done a lot of the work for you.

We are in the era of not just maximizing distance but also minimizing the penalty of common misses for each player. This is why, now more than ever, custom fitting is essential to help you see results on every swing you make.

The methodology is simple: We want to give you the tools and information to go out and find what works best for you—offering recommendations for your swing speed with feedback from the people who work every single day to help golfers get peak performance out of their equipment.

Best driver of 2021: Meet the fitters

Nick Sherburne: Founder, Club Champion
Clare Cornelius: Fitter,
Cool Clubs
Eric Johnson: Fitter, True Spec Golf
Shaun Fagan: Fitter, True Spec Golf
Kirk Oguri: PGA Professional/ Club Specialist, Pete’s Golf
Sue O’Connor: Fitter, Cool Clubs 
Scott Felix: Owner, Felix Club Works
Mark Knapp: Club Fitter, Carls Golfland
Ryan Johnson: Club Fitter, Carls Golfland
Eric Hensler: Manager & Fitter, 
Miles of Golf
Brad Coffield: Fitter Carls Golfland
Nick Waterworth: Fitter, Haggin Oaks Golf Super Shop
Adam White: Co-Founder & Director of Club Fitting, Measured Golf
Scott Anderson: VP of Sales, Fitter, True Spec Golf
Matthew Sim: Director of Operations, Modern Golf
Ian Fraser: CEO & Founder, Tour Experience Golf
Mike Martysiewicz: Director of Club Fitting & Building, Tour Experience Golf
Shawn Zawodni: Fitter, Miles of Golf
Ben Giunta: Owner, The Tour Van

Best driver of 2021: The categories

We have broken our 2021 best drivers list into four total categories. Three are swing speed-based and the other forgiveness.

  1. Best driver for faster swing speeds 106+ mph
  2. Best driver for swing speeds 95-105 mph
  3. Best driver for slower swing speeds <94 mph
  4. Best driver most forgiving 

We select this format because every golfer fits into one of these categories regardless of age, handicap, or gender, and for a lot of golfers, forgiveness is the number one factor when selecting a driver.

Before we started building the survey, we reached out to our trusted fitters to discuss how they sort through the endless head combinations available to golfers. Time after time, swing speed and forgiveness were the highest-ranked choices, after that it comes down to adjustability to fit individual players and their trends.

We then worked internally to craft a survey that allowed the fitters to be honest—we want the truth just as much as you do, and to prevent anyone from feeling they couldn’t be, we allowed all of the results and quotes to remain anonymous unless otherwise stated.

We can’t thank the fitters enough for their time, and we hope that in your search for your best driver for 2021, we can help you find it!

BEST DRIVER FOR 106 MPH AND ABOVE

TaylorMade SIM2

The standard model is the lowest spinning of the three new SIM2 drivers and has the most forward CG to offer on average 250 rpm less spin than the Max, while still maintaining stability. The stock rear weight is 16 grams and it has a larger face than its predecessor to increase confidence and make the club more forgiving overall.

For the full technology breakdown, check out our 2021 TaylorMade SIM2 launch piece.

Fitter notes

  • For golfers who need to lower spin but still need added trajectory, the SIM2 is fantastic. The best advice I can give to any golfers looking at the SIM2 is to try different lofts and work with the adjustable hosel to fine-tune face angle and shot shape, because it’s extremely rare to have a golfer leave a fitting with a SIM2 in a standard-setting.
  • The deeper face compared to last year’s SIM is a real confidence booster for a lot of the players I have worked with and fit into this driver. If you are a golfer with a more negative angle of attack and need some spin control based on your swing dynamics this is a great driver to try.
  • The aluminum ring really does add stability to the head and from a stability and MOI standpoint, it’s an upgrade from last year’s driver.

Titleist TSi3

The new Titleist SureFit weight system makes adjusting the TSi3’s center of gravity a snap, and beyond the stock eight-gram weight, additional weights are available in two-gram increments up to 12 grams and down to four. This makes dialing in head weight and ball flight tendencies much easier than before and improves the overall fitting process.

What makes the entire TSi series drivers unique is the ATI-425 titanium face insert, allowing engineers to once again make the faces thinner to reduce weight while also increasing the overall elasticity for better ball speed retainment.

For the full technology breakdown, check out our 2021 Titleist TSi3 driver launch piece.

Fitter notes

  • The TSi3 is a high-performance machine, and when you bring together the acoustics, the shaping, and the adjustability built into the head, it’s by far my driver of the year.
  • From our testing and fitting feedback, this new face material is a real-deal performance upgrade, and for those golfers who need some final tweaking to dial in flight, the new SureFit weighting system is foolproof.
  • Although this is still considered a better players-centric driver, if you are looking to nail down a shot shape, you can rely on the forgiveness and adjustability of this driver to make that happen.
  • Mid-handicap players with a higher swing speed need to try this driver because of its ability to retain speed around the face—and the forgiveness up and down helps a lot.
  • The 11-degree head is a must-try for players who create low launch and low spin dynamics and need extra height and to increase their flight apex.

Ping G425 LST

Coming in at 445 cc, 15 cc’s smaller than its big brother, the G425 Max, the LST offers a pear-shaped profile to appeal to players looking for a more traditional look. Those 15 cc’s were mostly removed from the rear of the head to shorten the driver’s front-to-back length and move the center of gravity closer to the face to lower spin without sacrificing overall MOI as much as possible.

The LST spins 500-700 rpm less than the G425, according to Ping’s internal player testing, and 200 rpm less than the previous G410 LST. The 500-700 rpm represents a much greater separation between models versus the G410 Plus driver line, which means it is easier for golfers to find their ideal fit.

For the full technology breakdown, check out our 2021 Ping G425 driver launch piece

Fitter notes

  • The LST performs exactly as advertised—by offering a very forgiving low spin head.
  • If you are a faster player but tend to struggle with centered face contact, the G425 LST is a must-try, and for those golfers with speed who have a tendency to miss left, the “flat” hosel setting sets all of the Ping drivers apart.
  • If you are a golfer who has a negative attack angle, the deeper face of the G425 LST combined with the lower spin performance can add some serious ball speed because the head is stable all over the face. To take that point even further, if you are a golfer who tends to miss higher on the face, this driver is going to help.
  • This is a tour-level driver with game-improvement-level forgiveness—plain and simple.
  • The added stability comes from the new weighting system and overall heavier head. The Alta CB (counterbalance shafts) is a must-try that pairs really well with what this driver is designed to do.

Callaway Epic Max LS

With a neutral shape and weight configuration that is the most fade biased of the Callaway family, the new Max LS maintains a high MOI (8,400+) for a tour-inspired driver. In addition, the AI-designed Flash Face SS21 and the new look Jailbreak Speed Frame create stiffness vertically and horizontally across the face. The result? Speed, stability, and a ton of forgiveness.
The new triaxial carbon crown saves 13 grams of weight, which was redistributed to increase MOI and lower CG, and like Epic Max, the Max LS also has a sliding weight to tune in adjustability.
For the full technology breakdown, check out our 2021 Callaway Epic Max launch piece.
Fitter notes
  • This, to me, is Callaway’s best head shape ever—it inspires confidence by being slightly bigger from address yet still offers lower spin performance. This is a great evolution from the “Sub Zero” because misses stay in play with the Max LS, whereas you could miss big with some of the previous Sub Zero models.
  • The Epic Max LS is what I like to call a “classic dependable.” It really helps on shots missed around the face, and it works for players with all kinds of swing types thanks to the adjustability—you can open it up, close it down, add loft, and use the sliding track to help with both ball flight tweaks and improve shot dispersion.
  • For players who have an upward angle of attack, this driver produces the perfect amount of spin to hit trajectory windows and provide a very stable ball flight. For players on the opposite end that have a more negative (down) angle of attack, you can do a lot with the head to keep spin in check to control trajectory—it is unbelievably adaptable.

Cobra RadSpeed 

At 460cc’s, the new 2021 Cobra RadSpeed driver incorporates 28 grams of front weighting (16 grams fixed, 12 grams adjustable), and an additional 10 grams in the back (8 grams fixed, 2 grams adjustable). This balance, in combination with Radial Weighting technology, gives golfers a fast, stable head to ensure distance and accuracy. The other highlight of the RadSpeed is the CNC milled Infinity Face, which ensures that each face is exactly the same which allows Cobra’s quality control to be some of the best in the business.

For the full technology breakdown, check out our 2021 Cobra RadSpeed launch piece.

Fitter notes 

  • The RadSpeed is the low spin driver this year for golfers that struggle with the excess spin that robs them of distance—it’s a perfect driver for the player that also tended to miss to the left (a hook for a right-handed golfer).
  • Not only does this driver perform, but it also looks awesome, comes in a number of color options, and is equipped with great stock shafts. It also happens to come in at a lower price point than most of the big players—it’s a win-win all around.
  • The heavy weight in the front configuration makes this driver one of the lowest spinning and lower launching drivers on the market but without losing stability. When you pair the proper weight configuration with the loft setting you would be shocked to see some of the gains that are possible for the faster golfer.

BEST DRIVERS FOR 95-105 MPH

TaylorMade SIM2 Max

The SIM2 Max features a massive 24-gram back weight to deepen the center of gravity and boost stability. This back weight makes up almost 12 percent of the total mass, which is what helps create stability resulting in more ball speed on shots missed around the face. And when you do miss it, TaylorMade’s Twist Face is also there to help keep shots flying straighter.

For the full technology breakdown, check out our 2021 TaylorMade SIM2 launch piece.

Fitter notes

  • This is my pick for the best all-around driver in this category, because it’s fast, forgiving, and the best part is TaylorMade expanded the loft options this year, meaning it’s easier for me as a fitter and for a golfer that is buying one off the rack to dial it in.
  • The ball flight window for this driver is higher than the standard SIM2 model when comparing loft to loft, but it still manages to keep spin in a very controllable window which helps those golfers that need some extra carry. I can’t stress enough to many of the golfers I fit that the proper height with a driver is key to unlocking more distance, and you shouldn’t be afraid to hit it more up in the air—you get that with the SIM2 Max.
  • If you need to maximize your carry distance based on your usual course conditions, this driver is a bomber. Be sure to use the adjustable hosel to your advantage—it can narrow dispersion in a hurry.

Ping G425 Max

The G425 Max has the highest MOI (a measurement of forgiveness) on the market, and its 460 cc head features a 26-gram moveable tungsten weight in the rear to help golfers dial in ball flight bias. This extra mass is also how the weight track can offer less movement on the exterior of the head while still creating the same level of movement inside the head to create a draw and fade bias compared to previous generations.

For the full technology breakdown, check out our 2021 Ping G425 driver launch piece.

Fitter notes

  • If you are a golfer who struggles with face contact and needs some directional control, this is by far the most forgiving driver I can put in your hands—it feels like point and shoot.
  • Honestly, I don’t know what else to say about the G425 Max beyond it just wants to go long and straight.
  • The big adjustable weight in the rear offers a massive amount of ball flight adjustability so make sure that you test all the settings to find out which one helps you reduces your misses. A great off-menu tip if you are going to custom order one of these drivers—you can get lighter CG shifter weights to help find just the right “feel,” and if you want to play it over length, it helps to keep the driver from feeling too heavy.

Titleist TSi2

The TSi2 has an improved high/low inertia of 13 percent over the previous generation and in the world of engineering, single-percent advancements are considered a big step.

What really makes the TSi2 along with the rest of the TSi series drivers unique is the ATI-425 titanium face insert, allowing engineers to once again make the faces thinner to reduce weight while also increasing the overall elasticity for better ball speed retainment.

For the full technology breakdown, check out our 2021 Titleist TSi3 driver launch piece.

Fitter notes

  • For the golfers who want a larger confidence-inspiring look, this driver is awesome. It’s almost as stable as the G425 LST—which is saying a lot—while still offering a very traditional sound, and feel.
  • The new titanium in the face insert has allowed Titleist to be at the top in every fitting I do, and beyond the head, they offer a full spectrum of loft and shaft options to fit almost any player. To be able to go as low as 7 degreesand as high as 12.5 using the SureFit hosel and keep it in the same (model) head with the same center of gravity is a big fitting advantage.
  • As a fitter that works with a lot of golfers in this speed range, I don’t feel there is any driver out there right now that is straighter on both good hits and mishits, plus it has that great “Titleist look.”

Callaway Epic Max

After combining all the technology from Epic Speed (AI-designed Jailbreak and Flash Face), Callaway made the Epic Max crown with even more triaxial carbon, saving 19 grams of discretionary weight, which allows them to create an even deeper CG and higher MOI. The 17-gram rear sliding weight allows fine-tuning of launch and spin while the OptiFit hosel provides up to 20 yards of shot shape correction.

For the full technology breakdown, check out our 2021 Callaway Epic Max launch piece.

Fitter notes
  • Forgiving, adjustable, and fast—the Epic Max for me is a driver that is often a starting point in my fitting because of the options it creates.
  • Whether you’re a higher handicap player who struggles with contact consistency or you are just looking for a driver that is going to help maximize carry and reduce dispersion, this driver checks all the boxes. It launches high, and you can create some serious draw bias. This might sound like an oversimplification, but if you are looking for “airborn and forward,” this is a no brainer.
  • If you want maximum forgiveness and need a lower spin profile, this is a driver that you need to try. The adjustability of this club can help you lower spin with just a few clicks and makes dialing in a flight window a lot easier.

Cobra RadSpeed XB

With 28 grams of discretionary weight, the XB features 20 grams positioned in the back (14 grams of fixed weight; six interchangeable weight) and eight grams of fixed weight close to the face. This recipe is popular in high MOI drivers, but with Radial Weighting technology, it’s fine-tuned to push forgiveness to the limit.

For the full technology breakdown, check out our 2021 Cobra RadSpeed launch piece.

Fitter notes

  • Cobra has separated its drivers perfectly this year, and it’s really helping golfers get into the correct configuration. The XB is up there as being one of the easier-to-hit drivers thanks to how much weight has been moved away from the face and if you put a heavier weight in the back port, it’s mega forgiving!
  • I still feel that Cobra doesn’t get the credit they deserve for building a super forgiving driver that looks and sounds really good. The adjustability is straight-forward and easy to understand, and even when it’s adjusted, it still sits neutral behind the ball.
  • If you are a neutral ball flight player who wants to get as much as you can out of your driver with some subtle draw bias, the XB is a fantastic option because you can bring it more upright with the hosel, and it’s going to help move your start line (initial launch direction) to the left without causing a big hook.
  • If you are testing this driver, 100 percent make sure to use the adjustability to your advantage, the upright setting can be a big help if you are a golfer that struggles with the occasional right miss but doesn’t want to use a “draw” type driver.

BEST DRIVERS FOR SWING SPEEDS OF 94 MPH AND BELOW

Ping G425 Max

The G425 Max has the highest MOI (a measurement of forgiveness) on the market, and its 460 cc head features a 26-gram moveable tungsten weight in the rear to help golfers dial in ball flight bias. This extra mass is also how the weight track can offer less movement on the exterior of the head while still creating the same level of movement inside the head to create a draw and fade bias compared to previous generations. It also comes in a multitude of lofts that can be further adjusted with the trajectory tuning hosel.

For the full technology breakdown, check out our 2021 Ping G425 driver launch piece.

Fitter notes

  • The big fitting and consumer benefit of the Ping G425 Max is how much you can get out of this head depending on the player. It used to be that drivers geared for moderate clubhead speeds sat really closed and generally only came in higher lofts. With the Max, you get all kinds of loft options and it sits really square-to-open depending on the adapter setting.
  • The one thing to keep in mind is the G425 Max has one of the heaviest driver heads on the market, so it can start to feel a bit heavy for certain players depending on the shaft that’s being tested—but all of the Ping stock shafts are counterbalanced to help with this. With that in mind, you can custom order the CG shifter in various weights to make sure you are dialed in.
  • This driver is the undefeated king of stability. If you aren’t a range rat and want to just enjoy your time on the golf course, this one is for you.
  • For any golfer on the lowest end of the swing speed spectrum, you HAVE to try this driver with the stock Ping Alta. It’s only 40 grams and just wants to launch the ball up as fast as possible.
  • If you want a draw-biased driver now and a neutral or fade-biased driver later, the functionality engineered into this head will give you just that thanks to the CG shifter and adjustable hosel. If you arent working with the adjustment features of the G425 Max you are 100 percent missing out.

Titleist TSi1

When I say lightweight, I mean lightweight! The TSi1, in a standard configuration with its featured shaft, comes in at just over 40 grams lighter than most standard drivers. This lighter package makes it easier to control and also helps the target player gain just under 2 mph on average based on Titleist’s extensive testing.

The TSi1 driver has been optimized for moderate swing speed players—to increase club speed, resulting in faster ball speeds, more distance, and greater control, thanks to an overall lightweight design.

For the full technology breakdown, check out our 2021 Titleist TSi1 driver launch piece.

Fitter notes

  • This driver works exactly as advertised and helps any golfer looking for extra speed, height, and distance. For the golfer in this speed category, the stock shafts are a perfect match to the head and keep the whole driver package as light as possible.
  • The great thing about the TSi1 from a fitting and options perspective is that it comes in a 9° loft, which helps the player that already creates an effective dynamic loft but needs help to get some extra speed. On top of that, the sure-fit hosel is key to reducing dispersion and create better start lines which result in more fairways hit.
  • If you are a golfer that has lost distance and wants to get some of it back, the lightweight package of the TSi1 is going to give you one of the best opportunities. – from the head to the featured shaft options this driver has been engineered to create speed.

Callaway Epic Max

After combining all the technology from Epic Speed (AI-designed Jailbreak and Flash Face), Callaway made the Epic Max crown with even more triaxial carbon, saving 19 grams of discretionary weight, which allows them to create an even deeper CG and higher MOI. The 17-gram rear sliding weight allows fine-tuning of launch and spin while the OptiFit hosel provides up to 20 yards of shot shape correction.

For the full technology breakdown, check out our 2021 Callaway Epic Max launch piece.

Fitter notes
  • This is another one of those drivers that excels in offering mega forgiveness alongside adjustability, and it’s fast. Our testing leads me to believe that the lighter toe panel and more heel side internal weighting helps increase the closure rate leading to impact, and that helps increase clubhead speed 1-3 mph.
  • Callaway tends to engineer their driver heads just slightly lighter than others in the market which for many players is a big advantage for adding speed, while the shaping of the head maintains forgiveness. Also for those golfers that are looking to get absolutely everything they can when it comes to distance, you can get the Epic Max in an “LD” (long drive) configuration with a 47″ shaft!

Ping G425 SFT

The G425 SFT is officially Ping’s greatest slice killer to date. Thanks to the fixed heel-biased 23-gram tungsten weight and adjusted head shaping, it offers 10 yards more left bias than the previous G410 SFT and a whopping 25-plus yards more fade correction than the G425 Max.

For the full technology breakdown, check out our 2021 Ping G425 driver launch piece.

Fitter notes

  • If you slice the golf ball, the G425 SFT is going to help you have more fun on the course—it’s really just that easy to hit.
  • Don’t sleep on the stock Alta CB Slate shaft. Ping has taken its “whole club” design approach to the next level with their most recent stock shafts, and they pair very well with this head.
  • The SFT is a great driver for golfers at slower speeds even if you don’t always need “slice correction” because many golfers in this category have difficulty closing the face square at impact. This driver really helps with that.
  • When it comes to draw-bias, the design team at Ping didn’t mess around with this one, and when you add in the trajectory tuning hosel, you can bump the loft up an extra 1.5 degrees to really close it.

TaylorMade SIM2 Max

The SIM2 Max features a massive 24-gram back weight to deepen the center of gravity and boost stability. This back weight makes up almost 12 percent of the total mass, which is what helps create stability resulting in more ball speed on shots missed around the face. And when you do miss it, TaylorMade’s Twist-Face is also there to help keep shots flying straighter.

For the full technology breakdown, check out our 2021 TaylorMade SIM2 Launch piece.

Fitter notes

  • If you need to maximize carry distance based on your usual course conditions, this driver is a bomber. Be sure to use the adjustable hosel to your advantage—it will narrow dispersion in a hurry.
  • The heavier inertia generator in the rear of the head really helps make this driver stable, and if you are looking to try out a slightly lighter platform, the weight in the sole can be ordered light to potentially help add some speed.
  • The important thing to note for golfers in this speed range is that TaylorMade has a lot of lighter-weight stock shaft options—including the Fujikura AirSpeeder—that can bring this club to life and help you swing it faster.
  • It’s amazing to me how well this driver works for so many golfers. The head in the stock setting is just ever so slightly draw-biased, but once you open the face and lower the loft, it becomes neutral to offer more workability.
  • Join the best driver of 2021 discussion in the forums!

MOST FORGIVING/STRAIGHTEST

Ping G425 Max

The G425 Max has the highest MOI (a measurement of forgiveness) on the market, and its 460 cc head features a 26-gram moveable tungsten weight in the rear to help golfers dial in ball flight bias. This extra mass is also how the weight track can offer less movement on the exterior of the head while still creating the same level of movement inside the head to create a draw and fade bias compared to previous generations. It also comes in a multitude of lofts that can be further adjusted with the trajectory tuning hosel.

For the full technology breakdown, check out our 2021 Ping G425 driver launch piece.

Fitter Notes

  • If you want a big, stable, forgiving driver that’s going to allow you to quickly and easily reduce dispersion, the G425 Max is going to make golf feel a lot easier.

Callaway Epic Max

After combining all the technology from Epic Speed (AI-designed Jailbreak and Flash Face), Callaway made the Epic Max crown with even more triaxial carbon, saving 19 grams of discretionary weight, which allows them to create an even deeper CG and higher MOI. The 17-gram rear sliding weight allows fine-tuning of launch and spin while the OptiFit hosel provides up to 20 yards of shot shape correction.

For the full technology breakdown, check out our 2021 Callaway Epic Max launch piece

Fitter notes
  • If carry distance is your issue, buckle up, because the Epic Max can really help add carry and help you significantly reduce dispersion thanks to all of the adjustable features and head shape.
  • Off the rack, the driver is slightly draw-biased, but thanks to the OptiFit hosel you can fine-tune the head by going upright or flat to improve start line and then use the sliding weight to further tighten dispersion.
  • Absoutely top-notch. Even though adjustability has been around for a long time now, golfers need to get a better understanding of how the settings can have a huge impact on making a driver more forgiving for them as an individual. The Max starts off as an already forgiving head, but once you start to tweak those settings, you would be shocked with how much you can control direction and dispersion.

TaylorMade SIM2 Max

The SIM2 Max features a massive 24-gram back weight to deepen the center of gravity and boost stability. This back weight makes up almost 12 percent of the total mass, which is what helps create stability resulting in more ball speed on shots missed around the face. And when you do miss it, TaylorMade’s Twist-Face is also there to help keep shots flying straighter.

For the full technology breakdown, check out our 2021 TaylorMade SIM2 launch piece.

Fitter notes

  • If you are looking for a technology pushing driver that offers a higher ball flight, mid to lower spin and forgiveness, the SIM2 Max is a must-try.
  • I don’t want to make it sound like I keep saying the same thing but golfers need to use the hosel to help dial in ball flight. The SIM2 has a lot of loft options so you can pick a loft and then work with the adapter to move into your desired safe shot and miss. An example of this is to loft up the head and then use the sleeve to bring the loft back down – you want a 9.5° head that helps with your left miss, go 10.5° and open the face. Boom you’re dialed in!

Titleist TSi2

The TSi2 has an improved high/low inertia of 13 percent over the previous generation and in the world of engineering, single-percent advancements are considered a big step.

What really makes the TSi2 along with the rest of the TSi series drivers unique is the ATI-425 titanium face insert, allowing engineers to once again make the faces thinner to reduce weight while also increasing the overall elasticity for better ball speed retainment.

For the full technology break down check out our 2021 Titleist TSi3 driver launch piece.

Fitter notes

  • The TSi2 is the perfect blend of forgiveness, ball speed, and spin control in a traditionally shaped head.
  • Golfers need to take advantage of this driver’s adjustability – finding the right hosel setting can make all the difference and you can go the extra mile by fine-tuning the back sure-fit weight. Go heavier and you will gain stability and some potential extra launch or go lighter to add some speed.
  • Make sure you test all the shaft options that are available for this driver because its adds to the versatility – Titleist has one of the largest selections of no up-charge feature shafts of the major OEMs and you can build anything from a heavier fairway finder to ultralightweight club to suit your exact needs.

Cobra RadSpeed XB

With 28 grams of discretionary weight, the XB features 20 grams positioned in the back (14 grams of fixed weight; six interchangeable weight) and eight grams of fixed weight close to the face. This recipe is popular in high MOI drivers, but with Radial Weighting technology, it’s fine-tuned to push forgiveness to the limit.

For the full technology breakdown, check out our 2021 Cobra RadSpeed launch piece.

Fitter notes

  • The greatest performance element of the RadSpeed XB is its ability to launch the ball higher while keeping spin down when comparing loft to loft with the standard RadSpeed. This works perfectly for golfers who tend to hit the ball through a lower launch window and lose out on potential carry distance.
  • The XB is the perfect driver for a golfer that is looking for “around the face” stability, and lower spin performance in a distance driven head/model. One thing I highly recommend players try is lofting down an extra half-degree than they are used to because that extra will help lower spin and increase ball speed without creating a big change in the overall flight window.
  • If you are looking to straighten out ball flight caused by misses around the face, playing the XB with a slightly heavier weight in the back creates one very stable head. Or you can go the other way and make it lighter allowing for a longer length and some additional speed with next to no effect on total MOI.

Conclusion

The fitters consulted for this piece have accumulated data from thousands of fittings with golfers just like you. From beginners to tour players, their feedback and information can’t be undervalued.

Now it’s your turn: Everybody swings the club differently, and everybody has their own experience. We want to hear from you. What driver are you using? What did you switch from? What performance gains did you find in your own game? Share your experience to help others!

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Equipment

Best irons in golf of 2021: The shotmakers

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A new set of irons is the single biggest investment you can make into your set of golf clubs. At GolfWRX, to determine the 2021 best irons and their categories, we have compiled an expert panel of fitters to help you find out which of 2021 irons is best for your game.

In 2021, OEMs have continued to push the engineering envelope of iron design by utilizing new technology and manufacturing methods to create clubs that offer forgiveness, along with faster, more consistent club faces and launch windows. Not only that, but we are also seeing more segmentation of models from equipment manufacturers to help you determine your best set and/or set combination thanks to fitting.

These fitting options are important because irons are the key to better scoring and by building the perfect set, you create a cohesive group of clubs in your bag to help you reduce dispersion and hit it closer to your target.

That being said, ultimately the best way to find your personal iron set is to work with a professional fitter using a launch monitor. The difficult part is a lot of people don’t have easy access to fitters, launch monitors, and club builders—so at GolfWRX, we have done a lot of the work for you.

We are in the era of not just maximizing distance but also minimizing the penalty of common misses for each player—this applies to irons just as much as it does with any other club in the bag. This is why, now more than ever, custom fitting is essential to help you see results on every swing you make.

Join the discussion about best irons 2021 in the forums!

The methodology is simple: We want to give you the tools and information to go out and find what works best for you by offering recommendations for your individual iron set wants and needs with insight and feedback from the people who work every single day to help golfers get peak performance out of their equipment.

Best irons of 2021: How we did it

Before starting the process of building our best iron survey, we reached out to our trusted fitters to discuss how they sort through the endless number of iron options available to golfers. The consensus was clear—the best fitters in the world see all the options available in the marketplace, analyze their performance traits, and pull from that internal database of knowledge and experience like a supercomputer when they are working with a golfer.

It’s essentially a huge decision tree derived from experience and boiled down to a starting point of options—and it has nothing to do with a handicap!

Modern iron sets are designed into player categories that overlap the outdated “what’s your handicap?” model, and at GolfWRX, we believe it is important to go beyond handicap and ask specific questions about the most crucial performance elements fitters are looking at to help golfers find the best set of irons for them. From overall performance to shotmaking, to helping players achieve better trajectories and speed, we strived to ask the right questions.

These are the best iron categories we have developed to help you the reader determine what rankings are most important for your swing and game.

Best irons of 2021: The categories

Best irons of 2021: Meet the fitters

Nick Sherburne: Founder, Club Champion
Clare Cornelius: Fitter,
 Cool Clubs
Eric Johnson: Fitter, True Spec Golf
Shaun Fagan: Fitter, True Spec Golf
Kirk Oguri: PGA Professional/ Club Specialist, Pete’s Golf
Sue O’Connor: Fitter, Cool Clubs 
Scott Felix: Owner, Felix Club Works
Mark Knapp: Club Fitter, Carls Golfland
Ryan Johnson: Club Fitter, Carls Golfland
Eric Hensler: Manager & Fitter, 
Miles of Golf
Brad Coffield: Fitter Carls Golfland
Nick Waterworth: Fitter, Haggin Oaks Golf Super Shop
Adam White: Co-Founder & Director of Club Fitting, Measured Golf
Scott Anderson: VP of Sales, Fitter, True Spec Golf
Matthew Sim: Director of Operations, Modern Golf
Ian Fraser: CEO & Founder, Tour Experience Golf
Mike Martysiewicz: Director of Club Fitting & Building, Tour Experience Golf
Shawn Zawodni: Fitter, Miles of Golf
Ben Giunta: Owner, The Tour Van

best-irons-in-golf-2021-the-shotmakers

2021 best irons: The shotmakers

Each one of these irons was designed with a single purpose: to provide the ultimate shotmaking weapon. You don’t have to be a tour player to appreciate the pleasure of hitting a well-struck shot with a club engineered to offer superior feedback. This category is all about control—and that doesn’t mean it “has to be a blade.”

TaylorMade P7MC

best irons 2021 taylormade p7mc

Their story: To build the TaylorMade P7MC irons, the manufacturing process incorporates a 2,000-ton pressure forging to ensure the feel and sound is dialed in. This iron is all business, and anyone comparing this to the smaller P7MB (blade) will notice its slightly longer heel-to-toe length, and just a touch more offset which makes it a great candidate for gapping.

It offers a crisp feel at impact and the workability of a blade iron, but in a platform that still offers forgiveness on shots hit outside of the middle. Looks, feel, and workability—it’s all here.

From the fitters

  • This iron is compact, clean, and offers a superb feel. The P7MC allows better players to have the confidence to hit the shots they want, while still having enough forgiveness hidden in the design to help with forgiveness.
  • It’s bare-bones clean and delivers exactly what you want and expect from a small forged cavity. I should also mention that it feels soooo good.

For more photos/info, read our launch piece and check out this forum thread.

Srixon ZX7

best irons 2021 srixon zx7

Their story: The Srixon ZX7 provides a compact squared-off blade profile with a thin topline to frame the ball and inspire confidence for those who prefer workability over maximum forgiveness. The “tour cavity” construction places mass where it’s needed for feel and acoustics while removing it from other places around the cavity to increase stability in the small forged cavity back.

The other piece of technology, which Srixon is using to maximize performance, is tungsten in the toe of the mid and long irons to condense more mass towards the toe for extra stability without having to extend the blade length. Using tungsten isn’t new, but when the goal is to minimize size while maximizing stability, it’s a complete necessity at this point, and Srixon does a great job utilizing it in the irons.

From the fitters

  • You can call your shot and hit it with the ZX7, and even when you miss a bit we still see nice results. The camber built into the (VT) sole allows for great turf interaction and the ball comes off fast.
  • Even though the Srixon “7” iron has always done well, the ZX7 feels like a big next step in feel and performance.
  • Amazing players iron that offers more ball speed and forgiveness than a lot of other irons in this category. Thanks to the center of gravity and slightly stronger lofts, it’s a top choice for elite players who want distance and need to control spin.
  • This iron has replaced all other better player forged cavity back irons for looks and performance. I dare you to find a better performing forged cavity of its size.

For more photos/info, read our launch piece and check out this forum thread.

Titleist T100

best irons 2021 titleist t100

Their story: Built from the ground up with direct input from Titleist’s PGA Tour staff, the mission statement from the design team for the T100 was to simply create “the best performing tour iron ever.” With a shape that is distinctly Titleist but completely redefined as far as offset, top line, sole width, camber, and blade length, the T100 gives players looking for a tour performance iron more playability than ever before.

The irons are co-forged with large amounts of tungsten (66 grams on average in the 3- 7-irons) in the heel and toe, and it looks a lot more like a single-piece forged player’s cavity back than a multi-piece forgiveness monster—but looks can be deceiving. It has the thinnest face Titleist has ever built into a true forged players club, which allows designers to push more mass around the head and create greater ball speed.

From the fitters

  • The T100 is a classic, clean-looking iron that packs a punch. From the address position, you would have no idea this iron has so much forgiveness packed into it.
  • This iron typically launches a little higher than some others in this category, which is great for lower ball flight players who are in need of more spin, and on the other side of things, there is the T100S model that delivers with less spin and a lower flight.

For more photos/info, read our launch piece and check out this forum thread.

Callaway Apex MB

best irons 2021 callaway apex mb

Their story: The Callaway Apex MB is forged from 1025 carbon steel with a classic shape that is similar to other blade irons from Callaway’s past, but this time with a slightly narrower sole and less offset. Another improvement is the 20V grooves ensure optimal spin control in and out of the rough.

The centrally located weight screw in the back of the head allows Callaway builders to maintain the precise center of gravity locations when adding or removing weight from the irons—it’s not a new idea, but it’s one that is key to allowing the irons to be dialed into spec for each golfer.

From the fitters

  • In my opinion, the Apex MB is the best-looking blade on the market. It’s also very easy to work the ball in any direction you want.
  • The central weight screw for adjusting swing weight has been great this year for quality control and to fine-tune during fittings. Although not everyone is sensitive to swing weight, this feature allows us, and secondly the builders, to get things just right.

For more photos/info, read our launch piece and check out this forum thread.

Mizuno JPX921 Tour

Their story:  The 921 Tour is about subtle refinements to deliver familiar performance with improved feel and looks. The iron is designed with the feel, flow, and performance of the MP series but with greater clubhead stability and a different player in mind. The MP could still be considered the “traditionalist” iron, whereas the JPX Tour caters to a more aggressive player needing a little bit extra help on occasion but still wanting a smaller-looking iron.

Mizuno’s Stability Frame design allows the 921 Tour to offer greater forgiveness (higher MOI) than the MP-20 MMC without the multi-material construction. The iron achieved flow from top to bottom by narrowing the soles in the shorter irons and ever-so-slightly increasing the width in the longer clubs—not something noticeable from address but a feature that helps with ball flight control and shotmaking.

From the fitters

  • The 921 Tour provides Mizuno MP looks and feel with a lot of extra stability. The satin chrome look has also been a massive hit with golfers who like a stealthy look over a shiny chrome.
  • First, it was the 900, and then the 919. Now with the 921 Tour, Mizuno has combined the best of both previous irons to create a stable yet workable tour-level iron.

For more photos/info, read our launch piece and check out this forum thread.

Join the discussion about best irons 2021 in the forums!

 

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Equipment

Adam Scott gives in-depth breakdown of his WITB 

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Adam Scott has a new podcast, ‘FairGame’, where he discusses a range of topic related to the game of golf, and episode 4 features a video that is a gearheads’ dream, with Scott breaking down his 2021 Masters WITB in stunning detail.

You can check out the video below for Scott’s full breakdown at the end of the article. Subscribe to the podcast here.

Irons

Before the Masters, Adam Scott swapped his trusty Titleist 680 irons for the brand’s 620 irons which surprised many golf fans.

In the video, filmed after the Honda Classic, the Australian still has his 680 irons in the bag, suggesting that his decision to change for Augusta came very late. Scott explains that his choice to game the 680 irons consistently is an “aesthetic thing” and that he prefers the offset look of the 680s.

It’ll be interesting to see what irons Scott has in the bag the next time he tees it up, as he reveals he has talked to Titleist about “bending, offsetting to the 620s”.

Wedges

Adam Scott has a four wedge Vokey setup (48 degree PW, 52 degree, 56 degree, 60 degree).

His 48 degree 10F wedge, he describes as “your pretty standard” wedge and “nothing fancy happening on the sole”, while his 52 degree 12F wedge, Scott says has a little more bounce but a similar sole.

Scott says his 56 degree 10S wedge has a little relief in the back of the club to provide some versatility to manipulate the face, while his newest wedge is the 60 degree 12D wedge that the Australian says has a very strong grind on the sole.

Per Scott, this provides more forward bounce and it also has relief in the heel to open up the clubface and “take some of the bounce away from the heel.” The Aussie says he put the new wedge in the bag to keep the club more square.

Woods

Scott plays all of Titleist’s new TSi woods, which he put in the bag around September, and calls the clubs a “good improvement” on its predecessors. 

The 40-year-old initially played the TSi3 driver, then TSi4 and now plays the TSi2, which he says is “probably the most forgiving” of the family for tour pros.

Scott has the club at 9 degrees and in an A2 position (just upright, but standard loft) after playing around with the position a little bit, and he has settled on the Ventus Red shaft – which he enjoys for its soft profile so he can “feel” the shots.

On his TSi2 7-wood, Scott says it’s the first time he’s gamed a lofted wood since he was 14. The club is 21 degrees set at D1, making it “around 20.5 degrees”, says the Aussie, who loves that he can land the ball softly from the 240-yard range. The club is equipped with a 100g Graphite Design DI 10 X Flex shaft.

Putter

Scott says his current flat-stick is based on his 2013 Masters’ winning gamer. His Scotty Cameron Xperimental Rev X11 features a slightly smaller head than his putter from eight years ago, and Scott explains the reason for that is his putter length is 45 inches, 4 inches shorter than his 2013 putter.

The Aussie calls the putter, which he began using at Riviera this year, incredibly stable with a super high MOI and very forgiving.

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Equipment

‘Best wedges you ever played: Then and Now’ – GolfWRXers discuss

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In our forums, our members have been dishing on the best wedges they’ve ever played. WRXer ‘TheOtherTwo’ wants to know our members’ favorite old wedge and new and kicks off the thread with his picks: “1. Cleveland TA Reg 588 56*/14* 2. Miura Milled Tour 58*/10*”. Our members have been sharing their choices in our forum.

Here are a few posts from the thread, but make sure to check out the entire discussion and have your say at the link below.

  • mycale: “Artisans. The hype is real. Went from Clevelands to Mizunos to Artisans. I have never hit ANY club that felt as good as these wedges.”
  • dlygrisse: “1. Spalding Johnny Miller 56* finesse wedge. My first wedge that made me want to work on the short game. 2. Cleveland 588-It replaced the Spalding after I sadly lost it playing at dusk. 3. Vokey SM2. (the one with the red saw blade, right before the groove change) 58*.”
  • gsrjc: “Mizuno T4. Edel wedges.”
  • mogc60: “The original Cleveland RTG wedges were the best I ever used. Granted, I was my best then as well. Used those for about 12 years. Had backups in every loft.”

Entire Thread: “Best wedges you ever played: Then and Now”

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