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2021 TaylorMade SIM2 drivers: Better performance, piece by piece

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TaylorMade is building upon the SIM driver platform with 2021 TaylorMade SIM2, SIM2 Max, and SIM2 D drivers.

With the launch of the SIM driver series in 2020, TaylorMade proved it could build drivers that offered low spin performance in three different configurations to enhance speed and fit golfers better to reduce dispersion. For 2021, engineers are taking the SIM driver platform further with the launch of the SIM2—including the SIM2 Max, and SIM2 Max D (draw)—by refining the package piece by piece to deliver better performance throughout the entire line.

2021 TaylorMade SIM2 drivers

2021 TaylorMade SIM2 drivers

What’s new, and what you need to know

  1. Designers have taken every step to look at different materials and configurations to add forgiveness while maintaining the low spin characteristics of the original 2020 SIM design.
  2. No more sliding weight track. The sliding weight on the standard model has been removed to save mass and increase MOI (a measurement of forgiveness).
  3. Three different models to choose from with greater differentiation to help golfers get dialed in more effectively and find the design that is the best fit.
  4. More precision built into every part of the driver. The only way to make a golf club, especially a driver, better, is to maximize the weight properties and geometry. By painstakingly looking at every single component and manufacturing process, that’s exactly what TaylorMade has done.

The technology inside and out

What’s the same? What has gotten better?

Speed Injected Twist Face of the TaylorMade SIM2

Twist Face technology: Since its introduction in the M4 and M4 drivers, this redesigned bulge and roll profile helps keep shots missed around the face online and closer to the center while also normalizing spin to increase consistency.

2021 Speed Injection port

Speed Injected face: Speed Injection was introduced with the M5 and M6 drivers. It allows TaylorMade to calibrate each clubface right to the legal limit of CT without going over. With the new SIM2 drivers, this manufacturing process and the system used to dial it is have been moved and improved to save weight and further fine-tune face performance.

New heavier Inertia Generator at the rear of the SIM2 head.

Inertia Generator: The extremely low and rear placed mass helps position the CG low and away from the clubface to boost MOI. With the new SIM2 drivers and the weight savings accomplished around the head, this weight is now heavier to increase MOI and drive the center of gravity lower.

Three models: The SIM2 driver family features three distinct models to help golfers find the right performing driver for them.

Improvement piece by piece

As mentioned off the top, the engineers at TaylorMade looked at every part of the driver to improve performance and increase forgiveness, so let’s take a deep dive into each component and put it all together.

CNC Milled ICT (Inverted Cone Technology) and redesigned Speed Injected reservoir

Speed Injected resin reservoir

TaylorMade is taking its face precision to the next level by CNC milling the ICT (TaylorMade’s patented variable thickness face technology) into the back of the face. Other OEMs have started to use milling around the face of the driver in a different variation, but this is a first for TaylorMade and allows engineers to also remove a reservoir from the injection process.

By eliminating one of the front reservoirs and only having one positioned behind the face, engineers have been able to remove the dual injection ports from the face and place a single port on the toe. Less is more when it comes to drivers, and less structure and mass in the front of the driver head frees up precious grams to be redistributed.

Carbon composite crown

Lightweight carbon crown

To say that the carbon crown on the SIM2 is revolutionary would be a stretch, but it is still a key part of what allows the designers to save mass and position it lower in the head and around the perimeter. The carbon crown of the SIM2 is comprised of six layers and comes in at just over 10g grams, meaning it holds less than five percent of the clubhead’s total mass.

Carbon composite sole panel

Carbon soleplate of the SIM2 driver

TaylorMade has used carbon in driver soles before, but it has never used it to make up the entire sole. By eliminating the sliding track, and the reinforcing needed to house the weights, it can utilize carbon from behind the face all the way to the extreme rear of the head where it attaches to the forged titanium back ring. Compared to the crown, the sole is comprised of nine layers of carbon fiber and only weighs 12 grams.

Although not part of the carbon sole panel, the other very noticeable new component is what TaylorMade is calling the “TPS Weight” for swing weight customization. If there is one part of the custom build puzzle TaylorMade has struggled with in the past for consumers it has been the ability to dial in requested swing weights—either because of length or custom shaft and grip combinations. With the SIM2, the folks at TaylorMade are hitting home it’s focused effort to deliver better at every turn, and this small weight results in a big change to their build process.

Forged aluminum back ring chassis

Forged aluminum back ring of the SIM2 driver

This is a whole new territory and a very cool part of the SIM2 driver’s story. Using a forged, CNC milled aluminum ring around the rear of the head saves mass that would have otherwise been taken up by titanium.

Milling on the inside of the SIM2 driver

The aluminum ring weighs almost exactly 20 grams. Titanium, compared to aluminum, is 1.67 times heavier (4.5g/cm3 vs 2.7g/cm3) so the ring saves 13 grams, which would have otherwise placed mass higher in the head. Those 13 grams are reposition in the heavier inertia generator and low in the driver to once again improve forgiveness.

When you put it all together, it is truly better piece by piece.

The 2021 TaylorMade SIM2 driver models

TaylorMade is doing everything it can to eliminate any confusion when it comes to differentiating the SIM2 models, so let’s break down the type of golfer each one is designed for.

2021 TaylorMade SIM2

2021 TaylorMade SIM2 driver

The standard model is the lowest spinning of the three new drivers and has the most forward CG to offer on average 250 rpm less spin than the Max, while still maintaining stability. The stock rear weight is 16 grams and it has a larger face than its predecessor to increase confidence and make the club more forgiving overall.

TaylorMade SIM2 driver from address

  • The SIM2 will be available right and left-handed in 9 and 10.5 degrees with an 8-degree head available in right hand only.
  • The stock shafts are the Mitsubishi Tensei AV Raw Blue 60 and the ProjectX HZRDUS Smoke Black RDX 70.

2021 TaylorMade SIM2 Max driver

2021 TaylorMade SIM2 Max driver

The SIM2 Max features a massive 24 gram back weight to deepen the center of gravity and boost stability even more. When you factor in the average driver head weight is around 203 grams, this back weight makes up almost 12 percent of the total mass, which is what helps create so much stability.

SIM2 Max driver from address

The face has also been made larger in the SIM2 Max compared to the previous model to help inspire confidence while still offering a neutral ball flight and not sacrificing any of the aerodynamic properties.

SIM2 Max driver face

  • The SIM2 Max will be available in right and left-handed in 9 and 10.5 degrees with a 12-degree head available in right hand only.
  • The stock shafts are the Fujikura Ventus Blue 5 and the Mitsubishi Kuro Kage Silver V5 60.

TaylorMade SIM2 Max D

2021 SIM2 MaxD (draw) driver

With the SIM2 Max D, the entire goal is to help reduce a fade, and that is achieved by moving the rear inertia generator weight more towards the heel and also moving the TPS weight to the outer heel area.

Heel bias TPS Weight on SIM2 Max

The Max D has the largest face area of the three models, which also helps those golfers who struggle with constant face contact.

SIM2 Max D driver face

TaylorMade SIM2 Max D driver from address

  • The SIM2 Max D will be available in right and left-handed in 9 and 10.5 degrees with a 12-degree head available in right hand only.
  • The stock shaft for the SIM2 Max D is the Fujikura Air Speeder 45.
  • There is also a women’s stock offering which includes the Aldila NV Ladies 45 shaft and the Lamkin Ladies Sonar grip.

Pricing, and availability

The new SIM2 drivers will all be priced equally across the board at $529.00 and will be available at retail starting February 19.

…infomercial style “but wait, there’s more!”

MySIM2 customization

If there is one thing golfers love even more than new equipment, it’s new customized equipment. TaylorMade’s “My” program has been immensely successful (currently offered with select putter and wedge models). For 2021, TM decided to bring it to the driver space for the SIM2 and SIM2 Max models.

The online platform will allow golfers to fully build a driver to fit their own style preference and make a club that is uniquely their own. The personalization options include:

  • Topline Paint Color: Chalk or matte black.
  • Aluminum Ring Color: Red, Blue, Gold, Orange, Green, Silver, Black, and Light Blue.
  • Crown Decals Color: Red, Blue, Gold, Orange, Green, Silver, Black, and Light Blue.
  • Sole Decal Color: Red, Blue, Gold, Orange, Green, Silver, Black, and Light Blue.
  • Face Pin Color: Red, Blue, Gold, Orange, Green, Silver, Black, and Light Blue.

Specs, pricing, and availability for MySIM2 program

MySIM2 drivers will be available for preorder starting January 19 at TaylorMadeGolf.com and at select retail locations starting February 19. The MyIM2 drivers will start at $629.99 and will be offered in 8, 9, and 10.5-degree lofts with a 12-degree loft option available in the SIM2 Max.

All MySIM2 drivers will have custom shaft and grip options.

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Ryan Barath is part of the Digital Content Creation Team for GolfWRX. He hosts the "On Spec" Podcast on the GolfWRX Radio Network which focuses on discussing everything golf, including gear, technology, fitting, and course architecture. He is a club-fitter & master club builder with more than 17 years of experience working with golfers of all skill levels, including PGA Tour players. He is the former Build Shop Manager & Social Media Coordinator for Modern Golf. He now works independently from his home shop and is a member of advisory panels to a select number of golf equipment manufacturers. You can find Ryan on Twitter and Instagram where he's always willing to chat golf, and share his passion for club building, course architecture and wedge grinding.

8 Comments

8 Comments

  1. TA

    Mar 20, 2021 at 10:29 pm

    Hi Ryan, love the breakdown on the SIM2. By chance did you measure the weight near the heal on the SIM2? The one they call the TPS weight? Thank you!

  2. Pingback: Best driver 2021: By club fitters for you! – GolfWRX

  3. jgpl001

    Jan 20, 2021 at 4:04 am

    I am NOT happy to see these.
    With all things Covid, lockdowns, restrictions and course closure I have only hit my (now) old SIM driver 5-6 times since purchasing it in March 2020
    Now its worthless, thanks, TM AGAIN

  4. Gunter Eisenberg

    Jan 19, 2021 at 2:39 pm

    Same old…same old….nothing revolutionary to see here. Move along…

  5. T

    Jan 19, 2021 at 9:21 am

    I like that you can customize the driver away from the horrid new paint scheme, but you can’t do the same for the fairway woods, so what’s the point? I can have an all blacked out driver, but if I want the 3W I’m stuck with the ugly colors. Big miss.

  6. Moses

    Jan 19, 2021 at 8:44 am

    Driver looks like Optimus Prime. No thanks to all these $500 plus drivers that aren’t any better than last years model.

  7. BJ

    Jan 19, 2021 at 8:10 am

    Review was good to listen to. Buy why does he say “composite” like that LOL. I have a buddy from South Carolina and when he says “Crayon”, he pronounces it “Crown”

    • Big GG

      Jan 19, 2021 at 8:33 am

      Look at the early reviews all over the net. The SIM 2 does not perform any better than last years SIM.

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Equipment

Srixon ZX7 irons: A development deep dive

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Upon their release, Srixon ZX7 irons became the fastest irons to be put into play by Srixon staff members—and at GolfWRX we took notice. ZX7’s even replaced some of the most long-standing irons in play on the PGA Tour including multiple sets of the cult classic Z745’s.

As someone who has always been enamored by the engineering and design process, I reached out to Srixon to get the inside scoop on how the ZX7 irons were so successful from the start. I spoke with Srixon’s Tour Engineering Manager Patrick Ripp about the development process.

Ryan Barath: How long is a development cycle for irons, and what does that timeline look like? 

Patrick Ripp: Development is non-stop, and we typically work on two-year product cycles roughly broken down into six-month blocks.

  • Research phase: This involves blue sky research for new technologies—new materials, performance directions for a specific market segment, and doing research into new manufacturing techniques.
  • Design (industrial design): This is the “whiteboard phase” and includes a lot of early sketching before moving into 3D CAD ( computer-aided design).
  • Development: This is all about working with our manufacturing partners on new capabilities, confirming our design will be achievable with the manufacturing techniques that we are pursuing before a pilot run sampling and final spec setting.
  • Production: The final step is to start mass production to hit forecasts for product launch dates.

There is quite a bit of overlap and a lot of collaborations across the teams, but that is the simplest way to break it down.

Now, when it comes to tour products, the schedule is pulled forward when we introduce products on tour prior to the public release. This introduction phase is one of the most valuable research periods for the next generation products. The introduction allows us to get the most in-depth testing and performance feedback as players work the new product into play.

Tour product research is generally non-stop as we are constantly fitting which can turn into testing based on the fitting results. If we need to solve a specific issue, we can easily and quickly prototype new concepts for further testing. If the testing goes well, the new feature or technology may end up in the next generation product line.

RB: As far as product creation is concerned, you talked about the sketching process—are there specific points of inspiration for creating new products?

PR: In terms of inspiration, it is different for every individual. For engineering, there is definitely a lot of inspiration pulled from other sports products. Aerospace is another big influence with a lot of our engineers studying or even coming from that background. The designers seem to pull design line inspiration and details from the automotive industry. Modern tech products and sports products are always on the inspiration boards during presentations.

Like so many others, the R&D team is always sharing YouTube clips of new manufacturing and finishing techniques that we might be able to take advantage of in the future.

RB: How do you decide on the final aesthetics, and how much does that relate to performance?

PR: We have a talented internal industrial design team within our R&D structure, and they handle a lot of the early design research. Typically, starting with 2D sketching, then 2D rendering, and then moving into the 3D CAD files to confirm CG properties. The engineers will work closely with the design team throughout that process.

In the 2D work, engineers provide CG targets and feedback on the design feature and how they might influence the CG properties good or bad.

For a one-piece forged cavity back iron like the 7 Series, the design has a massive influence on the performance. You need to adjust all your discretionary weight through design features. This makes it very important to choose the correct design early and then have a lot of collaboration between the engineers and industrial design to achieve the final production design.

RB: One of the most popular iron Srixon ever produced was the Z745. Was this the starting point for the new ZX7, or was it a from-scratch process working with tour players to deliver on their requests?

PR: We didn’t start from scratch on the ZX7’s, especially with the success of the 785’s on tour, but we did make a point to take a step back and reassess our Srixon iron lines. With the rebranding to the ZX line from the previous numbering system, we wanted to make sure this product line was more than a subtle evolution from the previous generation of irons.

For the 7 Series specifically, we wanted to understand what has been successful on tour and why certain models resonated with our tour staff. Obviously, the 745’s and even the 945’s have been really successful for us on tour, and the few players who were not playing the 785’s or Z-Forged were definitely in the 45 Series products. With the 45’s and 85’s being the most successful tour products, we started to iterate off of what made those irons lines so popular and how we might be able to improve on them.

As you may have picked up on the ZX7 irons, they are basically a beast of the Z745’s and Z785’s for shape and sole with upgrades all over, including tweaks to the V Sole specs. The other upgrades in the design are all thanks to the new tour cavity, which puts the sweet spot closer to the scoreline center and offers improvements to hi/low MOI for greater consistency.

The ZX7’s tour introduction has been the most successful iron introduction in our company’s history, even with the restrictions that we have had on tour throughout the introduction phase. Since the restart of the PGA Tour on the west coast, after players have had time to test over the winter, we have 90 percent (20 out of 22) of our PGA Tour staff playing in-line irons. Four of those 20 sets are Z-Forged and the rest are ZX7.

We only have one set of 785’s and one set of 745’s still in play. We have also had four players switch out of blades into the ZX7’s. It has been amazing to see the conversion and hear the positive feedback about the new ZX line.

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Best hybrids of 2021: By club fitters for you!

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The best hybrid for your game is going to be the one that gives you the greatest opportunity to both score and save shots during your round of golf.

In 2021, we have seen a continued expansion of hybrid options from every manufacturer with models designed to fit golfers of all skill levels and clubhead speeds to the point that some manufacturers offer models all the way down to 8-iron-replacement lofts. These hybrids all utilize new technology and manufacturing methods to launch golf balls higher, faster, and farther, while also offering forgiveness. It’s now easier than ever to find the right one that matches your swing and fits into your set.

You have to think of your set of clubs like a toolbox with a 14-tool capacity. It’s extremely important to make sure each and every tool has a defined role to make navigating around the course as stress-free as possible. Hybrids play an important part in that selection process.

That being said, ultimately the best way to find the best hybrid or hybrids for you is to work with a professional fitter using a launch monitor and gap them accordingly. The difficult part is a lot of people don’t have easy access to fitters, launch monitors, and club builders—so at GolfWRX, we have done a lot of the work for you.

The methodology is simple: We want to give you the tools and information to go out and find what works best for you, and we’re offering recommendations based on exactly what you need from your hybrids.

GolfWRX best hybrid of 2021: Meet the fitters

Nick Sherburne: Founder, Club Champion
Clare Cornelius: Fitter,
Cool Clubs
Eric Johnson: Fitter, True Spec Golf
Shaun Fagan: Fitter, True Spec Golf
Kirk Oguri: PGA Professional/ Club Specialist, Pete’s Golf
Sue O’Connor: Fitter, Cool Clubs 
Scott Felix: Owner, Felix Club Works
Mark Knapp: Club Fitter, Carls Golfland
Ryan Johnson: Club Fitter, Carls Golfland
Eric Hensler: Manager & Fitter, 
Miles of Golf
Brad Coffield: Fitter Carls Golfland
Nick Waterworth: Fitter, Haggin Oaks Golf Super Shop
Adam White: Co-Founder & Director of Club Fitting, Measured Golf
Scott Anderson: VP of Sales, Fitter, True Spec Golf
Matthew Sim: Director of Operations, Modern Golf
Ian Fraser: CEO & Founder, Tour Experience Golf
Mike Martysiewicz: Director of Club Fitting & Building, Tour Experience Golf
Shawn Zawodni: Fitter, Miles of Golf
Ben Giunta: Owner, The Tour Van

Best hybrid of 2021: The categories

We have broken our 2021 best hybrid list into two categories.

  1. Best hybrid for golfers seeking forgiveness 
  2. Best hybrid for golfers seeking versatility

We selected this format for hybrid clubs because every golfer fits into one of these two “want” categories, regardless of age, handicap, or gender. For many golfers, forgiveness is the number one factor when selecting the hybrids that will go into their bag.

Before we started building the survey, we reached out to our trusted fitters to discuss how they sort through the hybrid club options available to golfers. Forgiveness and versatility were the highest-ranked choices.

We can’t thank the fitters enough for their time, and we hope that in your search for your best fairway wood for 2021, we can help you find it!

Most forgiving hybrids 2021

Ping G425

The best way to describe the Ping G425 hybrids is as mini iron-replacing fairway woods. The hybrids share all of the same Facewrap and Spinsistency technologies as the G425 fairways but are intended to launch higher and stop faster to create playable trajectories for golfers who need stopping power—all the way down to a 7-iron-replacing 34 degree.

For the full technology breakdown, check out our 2021 Ping G425 Max fairway wood launch piece.

Fitter Notes

  • The shallower look of the Ping G425 hybrid is a confidence-boosting club for golfers of all skill levels. Even with the shallow face, spin stays in a very manageable range even on the common lower face miss.
  • This should be a go-to hybrid for anyone buying off the shelf because of its extremely stable performance and the ability to adjust the hosel to reduce dispersion.

TaylorMade SIM2 Max Rescue

The new SIM2 Max hybrid offers everything golfers loved from the previous version with a newly refined sole geometry to increase forgiveness and deliver more consistent results. The SIM2 Max Rescue has a C300 maraging steel face and comes with the now-familiar Twist Face, which only became a feature in the Rescue line last year.

For the full technology breakdown, check out our 2021 TaylorMade SIM2 Max hybrid launch piece.

Fitter Notes

  • The SIM2 Max took everything that was great about the 2020 version and just made it that much better. For players who use their hybrid out of the rough to advance the ball as much as possible, the rounded leading edge and V-Steel sole are a big help.
  • The slightly upright lie angle and internal weighting made the SIM2 Max ever so slightly draw-biased to help reduce the right miss and help get the ball in the air quickly.

Titleist TSi1

Titleist has never put a large focus of its R&D into hybrids designed for moderate speed players. Instead, most of the work has been used to focus on hybrids designed for higher speed golfers—that is until now. Like the rest of the TSi1 metal woods, the hybrids are about greater MOI and launch, and the new TSi1’s are the highest MOI hybrid Titleist has ever built. They are on average 20 grams lighter than a standard hybrid and feature a larger profile “wood-style” design to generate more green holding spin.

For the full technology breakdown, check out our 2021 Titleist TSi1 hybrid launch piece.

Fitter Notes

  • As a stock package, I don’t believe there is a hybrid that wants to launch higher than the TSi1. If you need some extra speed and height, you need to try this.
  • You can almost think of the TSi1 hybrid like a mini fairway wood—it just wants to go high and straight. If you find yourself hitting shots on the front portions of greens and they are rolling all the way through the green then you need more spin and a steeper descent angle and you will get that with these hybrids.

Callaway Big Bertha B21

These are a combination of everything Callaway has learned from previous game-improvement hybrid designs mixed with its most recent Super Hybrid. The B-21’s pack a major punch, all the way down to an available 8-iron hybrid.

The most important technology brought over from the Super Hybrid is the MIM (metal injection molded) tungsten weights strategically placed at the heel and toe of each club and optimized for loft and head weight. This puts upwards of 70 grams, or more than 30 percent of the club head’s total mass (depending on the loft), around the perimeter to boost MOI and raise launch. Raising launch also means shots that land with a steeper angle of descent, equalling greater stopping power.

For the full technology breakdown, check out our 2021 Callaway Big Bertha B21 hybrid launch piece

Fitter Notes

  • The Callaway B-21 knows who it is and just gets the job done—it helps golfers that slice the ball hit higher straighter shorts.
  • The higher lofts available in this club can make the game fun again for golfers that have lost speed and need help getting their mid irons up into the air.
  • Max forgiveness style hybrids need to be stable because they are going to be used all over the course and that stability around the face is where the B-21 delivers.

Titleist TSi2

The TSi2 (and TSi3) hybrids feature a forged carpenter 455 steel face, which, much like the previous generation, has allowed the designers to save mass and reposition it around the head to maximize the playing characteristics for each model, which is particularly important considering how much design separation has been created.

The TSi2 is a hybrid designed with the perfect balance between optimizing forgiveness while also offering playability for golfers with a more shallow delivery into the ball. Compared to the TSi3, which is one of the smallest hybrids Titleist has ever produced, and the TSi1 which is the largest, the TSi2 fits comfortably in the middle in terms of size and has low and deeper CG to create higher launch conditions for those who need it.

For the full technology breakdown, check out our 2021 Titleist TSi2 hybrid launch piece

Fitter Notes

  • The Titleist TSi2 hybrid offers the most “classic” profile, but it’s packed with technology to create forgiveness—most importantly the SureFit adjustable hosel. If you need help with the weaker miss to the right, an upright setting can really help with that.
  • It’s fast, it launches the ball really well, even on mishits, and its overall head design makes it easy to hit out of the rough.
  • The “stock” configurations available for this hybrid club can help add forgiveness to any golfer’s bag. You can get anything from tour-level heavy hybrid shafts to lightweight and whippy ones to shrink dispersion or really launch it.

Join the discussion here.

Most versatile hybrids 2021

Titleist TSi2

The TSi2 (and TSi3) hybrids feature a forged carpenter 455 steel face, which, much like the previous generation, has allowed the designers to save mass and reposition it around the head to maximize the playing characteristics for each model, which is particularly important considering how much design separation has been created.

The TSi2 is a hybrid designed with the perfect balance between optimizing forgiveness while also offering playability for golfers with a more shallow delivery into the ball. Compared to the TSi3, which is one of the smallest hybrids Titleist has ever produced, and the TSi1 which is the largest, the TSi2 fits comfortably in the middle in terms of size and has low and deeper CG to create higher launch conditions for those who need it.

For the full technology breakdown, check out our 2021 Titleist TSi2 hybrid launch piece.

Fitter Notes

  • All of the loft and shaft combinations make this my number one choice for versatility. You can get anything from tour-level heavy hybrid shafts to lightweight and whippy ones to shrink dispersion or really launch it.
  • If someone called me up for a hybrid recommendation and I had no idea about that person’s golf game, I would feel very confident pointing them in the direction of the TSi2. I know it sounds like we say the same thing over and over, but Titleist’s SureFit hosel is what sets them apart from other manufacturers.

Ping G425

The best way to describe the Ping G425 hybrids is as mini iron-replacing fairway woods. The hybrids share all of the same Facewrap and Spinsistency technologies as the G425 fairways but are intended to launch higher and stop faster to create playable trajectories for golfers that need stopping power—all the way down to a 7-iron-replacing 34 degree.

For the full technology breakdown, check out our 2021 Ping G425 Max fairway wood launch piece.

Fitter Notes

  • When I think “versatile,” I think of a hybrid that offers workability for players looking to control trajectory, and you get that with the G425. The new face design has shown a significant improvement in spin variation on mishits that has tightened dispersion a great deal for the golfers I have fit into it.
  • Not all, but a lot of hybrids have a tendency to want to be draw-biased, but you don’t get that with the Ping G425. Its flight is neutral, and you can seriously increase the fade bias with the flat setting on the hosel.

TaylorMade SIM2 Rescue

The profile of the SIM2 Rescue hybrid is compact with a higher squared-off toe to have a more “iron-like” appearance from address to help golfers find the perfect transition club from long irons to fairway woods. The leading edge is cambered and blunted compared to the Max version for golfers who hit down on the ball and offers more familiar technology including the Speed Pocket, Twist Face, FCT adjustable hosel, and TPS weighting for swing weight adjustability through custom.

For the full technology breakdown, check out our 2021 TaylorMade SIM2 hybrid launch piece.

Fitter Notes

  • For the faster player that wants driving iron trajectory control but in a more forgiving package, that’s what you get with the Sim2.
  • This hybrid is freaky long in the right hands but requires a slightly faster or high spin player to get the most out of it off the turf since it wants to naturally flight the balls lower. It’s this level of control that makes it one of my tops picks for versatility.

Callaway Apex 21

The Apex hybrids from Callaway feature Jailbreak A.I. Velocity Blades that are engineered to increase vertical stiffness near the club’s sole and create more speed low on the face where players often mishit their hybrids. The A.I. Blades aim to allow the face cup to flex on the crown to promote better spin rate consistency and create added forgiveness across the clubface.

For the full technology breakdown, check out our 2021 Callaway Apex hybrid launch piece.

Fitter Notes

  • When you need an upright hybrid to either match up with your irons based on spec or to help reduce the miss out to the right, the Apex hybrid can do all of that.
  • The adjustability is what makes the 2021 Apex hybrid so versatile. If you are buying one of these off the rack, do yourself a favor and either work with someone with a launch monitor or take it out to the course with a few extra balls and the wrench and get this thing spec’d into your desired flight and distance—you can thank me later.

TaylorMade SIM2 Max Rescue

The new SIM2 Max hybrid offers everything golfers loved from the previous version with a newly refined sole geometry to increase forgiveness and deliver more consistent results. The SIM2 Max Rescue has a C300 maraging steel face and comes with the now-familiar Twist Face, which only became a feature in the Rescue line last year.

For the full technology breakdown, check out our 2021 TaylorMade SIM2 Max hybrid launch piece

Fitter Notes

  • Although this is more of a game-improvement style hybrid, I think Rory and Dustin Johnson proved last year with the 2020 model that you dial this into any player that needs longer approach shots to land softer.
  • It’s not just from great lies in the fairway where this club puts in work, the rounded leading edge and V-Steel sole are a big asset for players out of the rough, and when you need to hit it low you can.

Join the discussion here.

Conclusion

The fitters consulted for this piece have accumulated data from thousands of fittings with golfers just like you. From beginners to tour players, their feedback and information can’t be undervalued.

Now it’s your turn: Everybody swings the club differently and everybody has their own experience. We want to hear from you. What driver are you using? What did you switch from? What performance gains did you find in your own game? Share your experience to help others.

 

 

 

 

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Equipment

Rickie Fowler makes dramatic iron change

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Rickie Fowler’s struggles on the course have been well documented in 2021, and the 32-year-old has now made a significant change with his irons as he looks to try and regain some form.

The Californian has been playing Cobra’s ‘Rickie Fowler’ Rev33 irons with a limited number of proto irons even coming to retail earlier this year.

RF Rev 33 irons

However, at this week’s Honda Classic during the opening round, Fowler was pictured playing a set of blacked-out Cobra CB irons.

@ryan_broderick

Fowler has lost strokes to the field for his approach play in each of his last four tournaments, and despite a solid round of even-par at PGA National on Thursday, he again lost a stroke to the field with his iron play.

Here’s what some of our members have been saying about the change of irons:

  • rnolan79: “I have the RF proto’s, and the hitting area is the same as Cobra’s last MB, which I played prior. I believe the sole is also the same so not sure why he would not have confidence in the new sticks. I loved the King forged MB’s. I felt even though they were small, they were easy to hit and get good results. Sole was perfect for my swing. The RF proto’s just have about the best shape I have seen in an iron. I think he is just really struggling with swing changes, and it can be easier to switch clubs and maybe feel like he has more room for error. Plus, his putting is not even close to what it once was.”
  • bladehunter: “Yep. I’ve held them. 100 % not smaller than blueprint or Miura small blade. Not at all “ unhittable “ he’s down a rabbit hole. Period. It’s not the irons.”
  • Cwebb: “I had doubts from the beginning that he would actually hit the zero offset blades better than something else. Regardless of how much he liked the look of them.”

Have your say here.

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